Need help with my Paso Fino - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Need help with my Paso Fino

This is a discussion on Need help with my Paso Fino within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • David lee archer spooky horse training
  • Help me understand my paso fino

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-25-2010, 09:08 PM
  #11
Showing
I have a Paso Fino, too!

I also have a great trainer who trained the spook and bolting out of my TB. Too bad we're in Ohio :/
Linzie likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-01-2010, 04:05 AM
  #12
Foal
I have a peruvian paso that was severely abused as well in the past by a previous owner. She is the most nervous horse I have ever seen.

I've been riding her for a long time, I've been firm but calm with her, I'm a confident and fearless rider, I've been told that if I keep riding her and am consistent and firm and treat her right, then she'll get better and calm down...Believe me, I understand that despite all that, the horse still is edgy. Its taken me a while, but I've learned to listen to my horse.

The issue might not be the environment, but a constant expectation for pain that leaves the horse on edge wondering when its going to come, especially if she was consistently abused for a long time. It almost gets ingrained. One of my biggest issues with her was that when stopped, I could click my mouth or tap her lightly to tell her to go forward and she would practically bolt. She would never start off in a true walk, she would just take off into a faster gait so quickly that I would almost fall off her.

This had me so frustrated...I didn't know WHAT to do to solve this. Finally, I don't know what made me do this, desperation perhaps, but she was stopped and I told her verbally to "walk on" and squeezed my thighs. She wasn't sure what to make of this, but I felt her shift her weight forward, so I praised her and scratched her on the neck and told her she was a good girl. Then I tried again, and I got another shift. More praise and scratching. And again, I felt the shift so I repeated and she moved a hoof. It wasn't 10 minutes later that when I said "walk on", she actually walked.

I assume that she had been abused with spurs (and perhaps more) rather severely. That's about the time I realized how bad it was and that I can't possibly expect her to truly understand what I'm asking. Bad training is no better than no training. Either way, the horse will not understand what you want or what you expect. Abby was not understanding what I wanted when I clicked or tapped, she had bad things associated with clicking and tapping, she didn't trust it, she wasn't comfortable, I wasn't going to get anywhere.

What I'm doing now, since I got back from a month long vacation, is going back to square one. She doesn't know how to stand still to be mounted, mounting makes her nervous and once I'm on, she will take off into one of her fast gaits. When I try to mount, she just dances around nervously. I'm clicker training her and we're working on the command "stand", which I want to mean to her that if told to stand, she is to stand there and not move her hooves from their places no matter what I do to her.

She had no concept of this before and no matter how many times I ho'd her or made her back up, no matter how firm I was, she'd still move. She didn't understand what I wanted and who knows what she was expecting. Within 10 minutes of clicker training, I could stand on one leg and have the other leg over her back as she stood there calmly.

All it is is a matter of communication. I need to teach her what I expect, and as I do that, she learns what she can expect from me. There's a lot less worry about what's going to happen to her, if somebody's going to hurt her, if somethings going to cause pain etc.
     
    08-02-2010, 05:10 AM
  #13
Foal
I have continued to work with her at a comfortable pace with her. She is getting better, but I have learned to "listen" to her. Like your horse, when I clucked at her to get her to move, she would bolt. Sometimes she will bolt before I can even get in the saddle. I have started to use another person to hold the lead rope while I get in the saddle and that seems to help. I still don't let her get away with acting out--but I am not abusive about it--I am just firm with her. She is learning that I am not going to hurt her, but I am there to have fun with her. She seems to enjoy going for short rides in the small lot that we have. When I saddle her up, I do have to let her run in the pen with the saddle on and that seems to help her settle. She has always stood for me to get on her...just not get my other foot in the saddle before she bolts. I have thought about using a paste called So Calm before I ride her, but I don't know much about it so I thought I would talk with the vet about it. She also seems to STAY in heat. During the colder months when abreeding time is less of a problem she acts better. I often wonder if her heat cycle has anything to do with the way she acts. Oh well, as long as she continues to make progress then I am happy...and she seems to be more relaxed as well.
If you have anymore ideas or suggestions, then I would really appreciate it...I don't have to money right now to send her to a trainer...all the ones I have talked to want more than the "normal" rate since she is so spookie. She also seems to be worse with men than women...She has finally let my dad and my husband into her little world...but no other guys yet...and many have tried. She tolerates the farrier and the vet...but only as long as I am right there, if I leave she tries to run to where I am and if she can't find me she panics and it is not pretty when that happens She is not a "bad" girl, but she just dosent have any confidance in herself right now
     
    08-02-2010, 06:18 AM
  #14
Foal
Yours sounds so much like mine. Its horrible what abuse can do to a horse.

That's what I have to do with Abby as well before I get on. Have her run a bit to wear her out before I get on. I don't particularly like doing this because there's no structure to it yet. She does not know how to lunge. When she's put in a roundpen, she basically has it set in her mind that she is to run or she will get whipped. I don't use a whip, don't even have one. She needs to learn to listen and behave no matter how much energy she has or how high strung she may be. I will be happy when I get to the point that work in the roundpen is just as much mental exercise and paying attention as it is physical exercise. Already made some progress with it, she won't walk, but she will run in a gait that isn't what I *think* is a rack.

Personally, I'm not a fan of sending horses to trainers. I think its better to do it yourself if you can. It can really help to build trust and respect.

The only other thing I can add is to make sure that when she is acting out, she knows what you are expecting and what she can expect from you (remember, trust is earned, not given). You might have to go back and reinforce some things that really should be standard manners, but got messed up because she was abused.
     
    08-02-2010, 07:26 PM
  #15
Foal
I have started working her on the ground again, and that seems to make her more comfortable. She does seem to have pretty good ground mannors, she isnt pushy or anything like that. She lets Me lead HER when WE are walking...with or without a rope. She does know how to lunge, so working with her on that is pretty easy. I don't have a round pen, but I use my backyard that is fenced in, and she runs in a wide circle like she is in a round pen.
I love working with her myself because it makes me feel like the bond and trust between us is going to be stronger than if I just sent her somewhere else. She has such a great personality and I don't want her to loose any of that.
Our horses do sound a lot alike..it gives me hope that with persistance I can get her to settle down like you have with your horse. The funny thing is, not only is my Misty high strung...so am I. I have to make sure that I have taken my meds and I am having an emotionally good day before I go work with her, or she just feeds off of my anxiety.
She has been so good for me, she has become my favorite counclier...lol
She has no judgement to me when I need to cry on her shoulder.
     
    10-10-2010, 01:08 PM
  #16
Foal
How's she donig?

You have no idea how common this is - particularly in horses who have been passed around and haven't settled in yet. It took two years with ours but was well worth it.
     
    10-11-2010, 03:22 AM
  #17
Foal
Misty is doing bit better. I had an apprenticeship position for a while and I took her with me. She was doing ok there. Unfortinally I was let go due to my health and other issues. I still do LOTS of ground work with her and she seems to do good...not to many spooks. I havent been able to get in the saddle, and wont be able to for several weeks due to gthe fact that I am going to have surgery on Wednesday (gall bladder)
     
    10-11-2010, 03:44 AM
  #18
Foal
Thumbs up Thanks for this thread

I wish you luck with your gall bladder surgery. From what I know, it's pretty routine. Hope things continue to work out with your paso. I learned a few things from this thread. Aloha, Charlotte
     
    10-11-2010, 08:01 AM
  #19
Foal
Good luck with the surgery.

In the meantime why not start clicker training? Google KBR ranch, go to their really great training section and in there is a link to clicker training. It works really well and you can do it from the saddle. This is how we taught our really spooky mare to flat walk and just got a change in attitude from it. It's very easy. We put carrot slices in a fanny pack and gathered a bunch of items like bathtub brush, sponge, plastic bag wadded up, non sharp garden tool, small bucket, plastic shovel, nerf toys and such for the first less which is TOUCH. You go to Petsmart or some other dog supply stores and buy a few clickers for about $1.00 or less, put a string on it and atttach it to your fanny pack or wrist. Now you're ready to go play.

You start with commands the horse already knows from the ground like BACK, give the command, when it is done even a little bit you click, then give a carrot slice. We start with BACK, FOOT (pick up foot), BUTT which is move butt away, HEAD which is drop the head lower, and go from there. But watch out for the really smart ones. Our older stallion learned his commands really fast and one day we went out to work with him and he backed, lowered his head, moved his butt and picked up his foot all without any commands and then just looked at us like WHERE"S my carrots??? We laughed so hard we cried but NO carrots. We then gave him one of the commands, he did it again and THEN got his carrot. No carrot unless a command is give and he does the correct action.

Once they catch on to the idea you go to the TOUCH command. Hold out a non scary object, say TOUCH, click when they touch it with the nose and give carrot. To start with you may have to move it forward until it touches them but they catch on pretty fast. You then start moving an object high or low or to one side, give the command TOUCH and when they touch it, click and reward. This allows you later to command TOUCH from the saddle for something scary you encountered. I wouldn't advise it for a bull though.

Anyway glad to hear things are better and get well soon!
     
    10-11-2010, 07:22 PM
  #20
Foal
Wink A word to the wise

Quote:
Originally Posted by warthog    
Good luck with the surgery.

In the meantime why not start clicker training? Google KBR ranch, go to their really great training section and in there is a link to clicker training. It works really well and you can do it from the saddle. This is how we taught our really spooky mare to flat walk and just got a change in attitude from it. It's very easy. We put carrot slices in a fanny pack and gathered a bunch of items like bathtub brush, sponge, plastic bag wadded up, non sharp garden tool, small bucket, plastic shovel, nerf toys and such for the first less which is TOUCH. You go to Petsmart or some other dog supply stores and buy a few clickers for about $1.00 or less, put a string on it and atttach it to your fanny pack or wrist. Now you're ready to go play.

You start with commands the horse already knows from the ground like BACK, give the command, when it is done even a little bit you click, then give a carrot slice. We start with BACK, FOOT (pick up foot), BUTT which is move butt away, HEAD which is drop the head lower, and go from there. But watch out for the really smart ones. Our older stallion learned his commands really fast and one day we went out to work with him and he backed, lowered his head, moved his butt and picked up his foot all without any commands and then just looked at us like WHERE"S my carrots??? We laughed so hard we cried but NO carrots. We then gave him one of the commands, he did it again and THEN got his carrot. No carrot unless a command is give and he does the correct action.

Once they catch on to the idea you go to the TOUCH command. Hold out a non scary object, say TOUCH, click when they touch it with the nose and give carrot. To start with you may have to move it forward until it touches them but they catch on pretty fast. You then start moving an object high or low or to one side, give the command TOUCH and when they touch it, click and reward. This allows you later to command TOUCH from the saddle for something scary you encountered. I wouldn't advise it for a bull though.

Anyway glad to hear things are better and get well soon!
I've been working on an appendix gelding for over a year now. He's extremely smart, also large and tends to have emotional outbursts where he suddenly wants to rear and run off. I don't have a round pen (yet, I'm about to make a temporary one). I was using training tools from Monty Roberts and Stacy Westfall. He just seemed to get bored with everything, after learning quickly. I saw a Youtube vid about clicker training. Ah, the perfect motivation, I thought. Wrong! Sure, he learned quickly with the clicker and food. BUT. Per one of the books, I was starting to use grain as a reward. I now believe that grain may cause allergy, certainly mood changes, in horses. (They were taken off grain about 2 years ago for hoof health). I was training this horse, Rio, next to my own mellow retired gelding, Ricky. I was on the other side of a low wire fence. Rio got pushy in front of Ricky, so I motioned him to back up. He began backing, but threw his head up, spun around (I, seeing this, began to turn away at the last minute) and kicked me in the back. I sustained two cracked ribs. This horse had never kicked a human until then. I stopped training for a long time until I found David Lee Archer on Youtube. I began again, slowly, with stops for rewards. He's good now and after making my round pen I'm going to Join-Up with him, then start to ride. Maybe food works for some people. Maybe I shouldn't have used grain, or had the other horse present. But from now on, no food 'til everything is done and all the tack is put away. I'd at least suggest that, if you're doing clicker training, work with only one horse present at a time. Good luck! Aloha, Charlotte
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Paso Fino Stepher Horse Breeds 21 10-02-2012 01:21 PM
TWH x Paso Fino? horse_luver4e Horse Breeds 3 10-12-2010 12:59 AM
Paso Fino in FL ILUVTWH Horses for Sale 0 05-08-2009 01:55 PM
Paso Fino Help mitch Horse Breeds 15 07-21-2007 01:25 AM
need Help with my Paso Fino mitch Horse Training 2 05-29-2007 08:30 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0