Newbie seeking basic advice about aids used with gaited horses. - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Newbie seeking basic advice about aids used with gaited horses.

This is a discussion on Newbie seeking basic advice about aids used with gaited horses. within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Tennesseen saddle for rocky mountain
  • How to seat on your pockets to gait my rocky

Like Tree23Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-18-2013, 12:37 PM
  #11
Yearling
Hi, beautiful horse! That guy in the picture looks like he's riding her mouth. His posture looks like he's riding a speed racker, and most people I know buy a Lane saddle for Saddlebreds-they are built differently.

I would spend the first few months just walking on a looser rein, and working on a gait faster than a walk with some contact. Contact meaning that you can feel her mouth with a soft rein, not a loose rein. Just practice going from the walk to the gait to the walk for a few months.

Just shortening the reins and some leg pressure should get her moving, and a tap tap tap with your heels should get her going. You can teach her cues that you want. I use one kiss to walk and 2 kisses to gait. If I want to go fast, I raise my hands a bit, and sit on my pockets a bit more. I also love voice commands. You can teach her to gait by saying gait.

The thing that took me longest to learn with my gaited horse is to do Nothing. I get her gaiting, keep my balance, and give her a rein contact to keep her balanced between my seat and hands. Then do nothing. Just not interfere with her gait. Let your seat bones slide back and forth with the gait.

I could look for balance forever. Then I read something that made a lot of sense and works really well. Your balance should be such that if your horse just "poof" evaporated from under you, you would hit the ground standing. Not fall on your back or fall on your knees.

One of the most important things is saddle fit. Find what kind of saddle you want (trail saddle?), then find a saddle that fits. My gf has a Rocky Mountain and she goes very well in a National Bridle Tennessean gaited saddle. My horse has a different build and goes nicely in it too. A poor fitting saddle will compromise her gait.

Hope this helps
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-25-2013, 12:50 PM
  #12
Weanling
Old myth of riding on your pockets and legs forward is FALSE and puts more pressure on the horses back and is uncomfortable for rider too.

You can have some contact on the reins but not like the picture you posted. This type of contact puts the horse into false collection and will create more problems in the end.

Study dressage to ride (any horse) a good well balanced seat from your feet to the top of your head should be a nice straight line (no legs forward or sitting on pockets)

Using seat, legs to drive your horse is key. Light control (touch) on reins helps keep hindquarters engaged to drive into bridle.

Don't get caught up into MYTHS of the gaited horse of YOU NEED special bits, bridles, saddles, shoes, trims, riding methods of stupid balance of riding on pockets, legs forward, and etc.

Good luck with your new horse :)
Joe4d likes this.
     
    05-25-2013, 12:58 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
Hi, beautiful horse! That guy in the picture looks like he's riding her mouth. His posture looks like he's riding a speed racker, and most people I know buy a Lane saddle for Saddlebreds-they are built differently.

I would spend the first few months just walking on a looser rein, and working on a gait faster than a walk with some contact. Contact meaning that you can feel her mouth with a soft rein, not a loose rein. Just practice going from the walk to the gait to the walk for a few months.

Just shortening the reins and some leg pressure should get her moving, and a tap tap tap with your heels should get her going. You can teach her cues that you want. I use one kiss to walk and 2 kisses to gait. If I want to go fast, I raise my hands a bit, and sit on my pockets a bit more. I also love voice commands. You can teach her to gait by saying gait.
Quote:
I agree with everything EXCEPT the red highlighted.
The thing that took me longest to learn with my gaited horse is to do Nothing. I get her gaiting, keep my balance, and give her a rein contact to keep her balanced between my seat and hands. Then do nothing. Just not interfere with her gait. Let your seat bones slide back and forth with the gait.

I could look for balance forever. Then I read something that made a lot of sense and works really well. Your balance should be such that if your horse just "poof" evaporated from under you, you would hit the ground standing. Not fall on your back or fall on your knees.

Quote:
If this made sense, why would you ride on your pockets? Wouldn't that put you OUT OF BALANCE?


One of the most important things is saddle fit. Find what kind of saddle you want (trail saddle?), then find a saddle that fits. My gf has a Rocky Mountain and she goes very well in a National Bridle Tennessean gaited saddle. My horse has a different build and goes nicely in it too. A poor fitting saddle will compromise her gait.

Hope this helps
You have good advice except the highlighted that I do not agree with and find it more of myth.
     
    05-27-2013, 09:19 PM
  #14
Yearling
Well, Gaited07, you're absolutely right about the pockets. That was kindof dumb to say , especially since I have been working on the " poof" balance, and not getting on my pockets. I must have been up really late, LOL

The hit the ground standing is working for me , and tells me when I'm leaning forward or back too much.

That National Bridle Tennessean is known to fit a lot of horses well. It's a nice saddle.
     
    05-29-2013, 05:06 PM
  #15
Started
Actually, I do agree with the sitting on your pockets thing and the higher hands thing, though I come from a different breed.

I was having trouble keeping my five gaited ASB in the rack. She would cheat me, not stay in gait, canter off, pace... My dad would get on, perfect. I'd get back on, same old thing.

After taking several western lessons, I started naturally sitting deeper, sitting "on my pockets" more, using more of my seat. Came home after a few weeks of doing this(and after watching many good trainers work their gaited horses), and I had immediate improvement.

For my breed, you have to set them up for their gait at a higher head position, so you raise them up. You get your trot from lower. We had a mare sent to us who you really had to exaggerate this with.

With my breed in particular, generally speaking, you use more seat than leg, and you pretty much always have contact in their mouth.

Since the horse in question is not my breed, I am not quite sure if any of what I said has any merit. LOL.
     
    05-29-2013, 06:58 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storybook Farm    

I need to learn how to school a gaited horse! I keep giving her wrong signals that cause her to stop on a dime. I've gotten her into her gait (not sure if it's a pace or amble or... whatever...) and it's butter smooth. She's a willing worker, but I know that I'm confusing her.
Hello, welcome and big congratulations on your farm and your new horse!

I am still back on the part about "I keep giving her wrong signals that cause her to stop on a dime."

I think the best thing, if it's possible, would be to have someone video you while you're trying to cue her. Would your husband be willing to do that?

Gaited horses aren't all broke quite exactly the same and you are very correct to think you might ruin her by the inconsistencies. Many kudos to you for seeking assistance

Thus the videos as opposed to still shots if at all possible. If you don't have a video camera that will upload to your PC, what about your cell phone? You would have to establish a YouTube account, upload to YouTube, then put that YouTube link in your post. I think Photobucket also works but it takes a lot more steps than YouTube.

I totally agree that Charles, the Dear Old Gent, looks like he's cueing a speed racker and is ready and waiting in the saddle for the "racking turbo boost" to kick in

If you can get a clear video (no shadows on you and your horse) and the cues you are using to walk, gait and whoa, maybe we can figure out how your mis-cueing your horse
     
    05-29-2013, 07:28 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Just ride the horse. I bought emma from a girl with a trainer lke that charles clown in the top picture. He wouldnt shut up the whole time I was trying to test drive her, havine a conniption any time just the right amount of tension in his opinion wasnt there. Finnally told him to shut up and go away.
Step one, take that boat anchor out of her mouth and sell it for scrap metal For the life of me I don't understand why people think Gaited and gotta use something like that. I also have no use for that over collected nose in the chest look. That is insane. Yeh I know that is all stylish but seriously you ever see a horse running around the pasture with its nose in its chest ?
Step 2 just ride the horse. Quit worring about some bodies opinion of "proper" just ride. Us loose reins and verbal cues. Teach her YOUR cues don't worry about others. The object is to have a nice smooth happy horse that moves up the trail, Not some over collected show pony with you developing arms like Popeye .
greentree and dlady like this.
     
    05-29-2013, 07:44 PM
  #18
Started
I MAY not have said it just like Joe, but.....I agree. You are not confusing her. Just TELL her to go on, after the stop, or whatever (don't pet her and apologize, because then you just TAUGHT her to do the unwanted behavior). Whatever it is, she will soon learn YOUR cue for it, and everyone will be happy.

You may just need some saddle time after your 30 year break, because some horses stop if you lose your balance.

Good Luck with her! She IS gorgeous!

Nancy
     
    05-31-2013, 01:44 PM
  #19
Foal
Hi, All!

An update. "Walkinthewalk" here on the forum (Judy) PM'd me to see how I was doing. SO kind! I went to reply to her, but couldn't because I've only done 2 posts here, and one needs 5 in order to PM. So, hopefully Judy will see this here.

After reading the responses above mine (page 1 of this thread) I went back to that book. It helped me to decide to continue to work with my current endurance saddle rather than spend money on a new Land Fox cutback, and gave me a general direction to go re: aids, and general seat position. But I still wasn't getting a feel for how to signal her gait. When I asked her for any kind of speed, she'd jog or trot, and it's a rough one!

THEN, by God's grace, a friend who has YEARS of experience in English seats and knows the rudiments about gaiting invited me to go on a rail trail with her, about an hour away, in her trailer. We loaded up and went. I attempted to get Grace into her gate, and my friend said, "You're leaning forward when you ask her, and you're not collecting her enough." I wasn't supporting her enough with my hands, and I was leaning forward (insecure, I think, as someone above said, after years of being off). My friend demonstrated on her horse: collecting the reigns, she urged her horse into the bit, and asked him to trot. With that one piece of input, all fell into place, and I was all set. I sat almost in a chair seat, collected up her mouth, and asked her. She went right into a lovely easy gait: push button!

I really should have known, because as a child, my cardinal flaw when riding saddleseat was to lean forward too much when I asked for the canter (in anticipation of the jump she'd make, I guess). My instructor always had to remind me to sit back and upright on my saddlebred when signalling the canter. I think because I had no idea of the correct signal to get her into the gate, my insecurities had me doing what I'd always done wrong, and thus confusing Grace. So, here I am at 55 relearning that same lesson!

I must say that between the lovely, easy gait and the endurance-style Sycamore Creek saddle that I have (which is designed for easy-gaited horses and leaves her shoulders free to do all that they should), I could probably sit that gait for hours at a time. I now perfectly understand why this four-beat gate was developed and prized among circuit rider preachers and mailmen on horseback, etc., back in the day!

Now, my next thing is that there seem to be more than one type of easy gaits... something like, maybe, the difference between an amble and a fox trot and a rack??? That kind of thing (going on only what I've read in my book).

I can feel this on Grace. It's like a difference in diagonals when doing a standard trot on non-gaited horses; sometimes Grace seems to pick up one kind of four-beat gait, and then on another stretch of the trail, it's still four-beat but it feels different. So, that's my next challenge: figuring out finer points of gaits.

But I'm VASTLY encouraged that I now have the aids to get her into one of the easy gaits. I don't feel like I'm ruining or frustrating her anymore. Now I feel that I can "just ride" and also (I agree) step down her bit, and also just enjoy hacking on trails (she loves to go). I can't wait to go again! OH MY, those gaits are nice!
     
    07-28-2013, 01:56 AM
  #20
Foal
Storybrook -- my situation is similar. I took off riding for about 30 years also. During those 30 years I was in a couple different bad car accidents and have back injuries. Recently I got a lovely handsome Kentucky Mountain Saddle Horse. The smooth gait was a must and he has it. Unfortunately, I know nothing of his cues. What cues I learned (and am learning because I am in lessons again) are not the same for my dear Ricky. I don't want to frustrate him, but I think I will have to just break out and do what you did. It was certainly nice to read your story ...
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Seeking Advice BarefootBugsy Horse Artwork 2 10-24-2011 12:28 AM
I am new to Gaited horses and need some advice pls :) mysticdragon72 Gaited Horses 15 10-18-2011 09:28 PM
Quick advice on basic riding please Pilot Horse Riding 10 02-22-2011 08:24 PM
seeking advice. BuckskinLove18 Horse Tack and Equipment 1 08-12-2009 09:15 PM
Gaited Newbie **Wave** meggymoo Gaited Horses 5 05-28-2009 10:25 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0