nose out - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

nose out

This is a discussion on nose out within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Wry nose foal

Like Tree20Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    09-08-2012, 10:36 PM
  #21
Started
Neck reining you can get away with using many types of bits. Tom thumbs are my absolute least favorite bit because the communication isn't clear.
That one you've got isn't bad, I kinda like it actually. The only thing I'd consider instead of a curb strap I'd use a slober bar. A slober bar holds the two shanks together so that when you neck rein it turns the bit more correctly in their mouth - I can go into details if your interested. But I love the short shanks and high purchase, that's barely a step up from a snaffle if you don't use a curb strap - it's a more clear communication without being overly strong when compared to a snaffle. :)
I'd use a slober bar instead of a curb strap honestly (not that they're mutually exclusive you could use both, but I don't see a need).
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    09-08-2012, 10:39 PM
  #22
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperhead    
Now that I'm not training anything but my own horse, I just let her nose poke out all she wants on a loose rein, as long as she is balanced. If she becomes unbalanced, I gather the reins up and rebalance her. When I want to put her into real work, the body engages and the head drops. But proper engagement isn't what I'm striving for anymore, so I don't worry about it half as much as I used to. We're training for team penning, and something tells me piaffeing after cattle isn't the best way to pen them!
Yes, this is what I mean to say. It's a great skill to teach a horse to be balanced but you don't need to get after it allll the time, if the horse is balanced he doesn't need to be collected. Thank you for phrasing that so well (and so funny :P)

Snaffles are great for direct reining, I start all my horses in a french link and they either stay that way or move to a butterfly-shanked sweetwater curb for neck reining :P
     
    09-08-2012, 10:39 PM
  #23
Weanling
Here is a picture of her and I. This was a few months ago the second day after I bought her. Finally figured out how to get a picture here. Perhaps a visual aid will prove helpful.
     
    09-08-2012, 10:40 PM
  #24
Weanling
Please any critiques are welcome. I want to learn.
     
    09-08-2012, 10:43 PM
  #25
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PunksTank    
Neck reining you can get away with using many types of bits. Tom thumbs are my absolute least favorite bit because the communication isn't clear.
That one you've got isn't bad, I kinda like it actually. The only thing I'd consider instead of a curb strap I'd use a slober bar. A slober bar holds the two shanks together so that when you neck rein it turns the bit more correctly in their mouth - I can go into details if your interested. But I love the short shanks and high purchase, that's barely a step up from a snaffle if you don't use a curb strap - it's a more clear communication without being overly strong when compared to a snaffle. :)
I'd use a slober bar instead of a curb strap honestly (not that they're mutually exclusive you could use both, but I don't see a need).
thats the reason I didnt purchase a tom thumb. I read a couple of threads here, weighing pros and cons about the tom thumb. This bit was recommended by a few here in those threads so I went with it. She seems to respond to it quite well. Better than the snaffle. Im not familiar with a slobber bar. Im borrowing a curb strap and just ordered one today. So im very interested in your opinions and thoughts on any of this we are speaking of. Details, details, details.
     
    09-08-2012, 10:44 PM
  #26
Started
Oh!! A picture made all the difference. The saddle looks far too far back, maybe it's the angle but that picture is screaming to me that her back hurts. For a horse to have their head in the proper position they need to be able to pick up their back and push themselves from the hind end. But if their back hurts they hollow out and put their head in the air and ride hunched down.

I'd get her saddle fitted by a professional - here's a good link on how to tell saddle fit:
http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack...lly-fit-58116/
     
    09-08-2012, 10:49 PM
  #27
Weanling
This was a borrowed saddle that didnt fit. I now have a better fitting saddle. Not custom. That's coming soon. The bridle and bit is different now too than whats in the pic.

This is what im riding now.
Kimberley Synthetic Endurance Saddle
     
    09-08-2012, 10:51 PM
  #28
Started
Ok so the way a curb bit works:
You neck rein left, your right rein becomes slightly shorter pulling back on the right shank. Assuming the bit has a solid mouth piece, the bit will rotate and push pressure onto the left bar. Having a slober bar will hold the two shanks together to that the rotation happens more easily. Seeing as with your bit when you neck rein left and your right rein is made shorter all it would do is cause the RIGHT side of the bit to rotate and all it would do is relieve any pressure on the right bar, not actually add any pressure to the left bar- a slober bar would make it so you get pressure on the left bar.
The problem with tom thumbs is that when you neck rein left your right rein is made shorter and the bit V's out and pushes pressure into the horse's tongue and RIGHT bar, giving them the wrong cue. A slober bar can help that on a TT, but not fix the tongue pressure problem.

I like your bit alot, but if it needs any more 'oomph' get a slober bar, curb straps simply amplify the pressure, because any pressure added to the bit now the bit has something to push against. It also applies pressure to the area under their chin. But again looking at your bit that doesn't seem to be what you need.

But PLEASE check your saddle it looks very far back on the horse and the horse's back is quite hollowed out because of it. It may be the angle of the picture though, do you have any more?
     
    09-08-2012, 10:51 PM
  #29
Started
Oh good! Is the saddle still sitting as far back?



Here's a good picture to describe why it's be so painful
     
    09-08-2012, 11:06 PM
  #30
Weanling
That saddle kept sliding around. Because it was made for a much higher withered horse. The one I have now has a wider gullet. And it stays put.

Heres another pic. Same time perhaps a different view.

     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bloody nose... Again! horselover21 Horse Health 0 06-11-2012 10:08 PM
Wry Nose? weeeee Horse Health 2 10-20-2011 03:32 PM
nose whiskers southview charlie Horse Health 2 07-03-2011 11:00 PM
Sore nose Love8186 Horse Health 10 06-10-2011 02:52 AM
dry nose... allie84 Horse Health 3 09-17-2009 11:45 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0