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Probably a Dumb Question...

This is a discussion on Probably a Dumb Question... within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Why you shouldn't trot a tennessee walker

 
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    01-01-2009, 07:30 PM
  #11
Foal
I don't know much about TWHs, but our five-gaited ASBs trot every ride, because they're shown in all five gaits.
So it's kinda weird for me to hear that gaited horses shouldn't trot.
     
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    01-01-2009, 08:05 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Entitled    
I don't know much about TWHs, but our five-gaited ASBs trot every ride, because they're shown in all five gaits.
So it's kinda weird for me to hear that gaited horses shouldn't trot.
I can't speak to anything but Tennessee Walkers. The breed standard is no trotting allowed. There is a newer generation of Walking Horse owners that teach or allow them to trot. I disagree with that mindset but that's JMO

Given the founding history of the Saddlebreds they do carry a gaiting gene that allows them to be easily trained.

Their breed standard allows for them to trot and to perform other, intermediate gaits.

I may be wrong but I believe the first inclination of an ASB is to trot and it has to be cued to take another intermediate gait.

The first inclination of a Tennessee Walker is to perform anything but a trot without any cues to do so --- at least that's how my three are

I am one of the many folks who went to riding Tennessee Walkers years ago because trauma injuries started preventing me from sitting the trot. Why on earth would I want to teach a naturally born "glide ride" horse to trot when there are already many trotting breeds in existance and the running walk has been the Walking Horse's heritage since the founding of the breed in the early 1930's

For my part that is like ordering a Cadillac with standard shift
     
    01-04-2009, 01:22 AM
  #13
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
I may be wrong but I believe the first inclination of an ASB is to trot and it has to be cued to take another intermediate gait.
Right you are!
     
    01-08-2009, 11:54 AM
  #14
Foal
From what I understand, the naturally gaited breeds do not trot. If they do trot it is an anomaly. Just like when a trotting horse breaks into a pace or 'indian shuffle' or running walk.
     
    01-10-2009, 12:31 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
I am one of the many folks who went to riding Tennessee Walkers years ago because trauma injuries started preventing me from sitting the trot. Why on earth would I want to teach a naturally born "glide ride" horse to trot when there are already many trotting breeds in existance and the running walk has been the Walking Horse's heritage since the founding of the breed in the early 1930's

For my part that is like ordering a Cadillac with standard shift
I totally agree. I just got a TWH, and I guess I'm "old school," because I hold the belief, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." The smoothness (and gentleness) is what originally attracted me to the breed.

We turned my girl Annie out to pasture yesterday, and she immediately broke into a running walk (she is used to being pasture-kept and was thrilled to be out of the barn), with her tail up and her head bobbing. I was so happy to see this horse do something that she has had NO training whatsoever to do - it's just genetics.

BTW, I was under the impression that TWH's are supposed to have 3 gaits; the flat walk, running walk, and "rocking horse" canter. Is that incorrect? I know I had read that some are born with the ability to do other gaits, like the foxtrot, but I thought the true "rack" was discouraged, as it's more of a pacer gait? Are the rack and running walk one and the same, or are they two distinct gaits? I have heard them used interchangably.
     
    01-10-2009, 01:41 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Lori1983, they are a thing of beauty to watch them "hot-footin' it" across the pasture aren't they

TWH's do have three basic gaits, but the intermediate gait can vary.

The breed standard intermediate gait is the running walk. An irony as one of the earliest breeds that played a part in the founding of the Walking Horse breed was the Narangansett Pacer, which is now extinct - lol lol

I do not know of any Walking Horses (that are purebreds) that perform the Foxtrot, but I may have to stand corrected on that thought

I have seen four intermediate gaits on Walking Horses.

They can be the running walk (breed standard), stepping pace (big no-no for those that are sticklers), the rack (also a no-no unless you're into speed racking) and the hard lateral pace (the largest and most aggravating no-no of all when the horse is under saddle, as it will jar your teeth out and you'll be making an appointment with YOUR chiropractor from out on the trail - lol)

My eldest Walker is a Step-Pacer. He is every bit as smooth as the two that perform the running walk. I am glad I was gait-stupid when I bought him 18 years ago, elst I would have missed out on the horse & companion of a life time. I call him my Stepford Horse because he's never made a mistake.

Other than learning and listening for the footfall of these three intermediate gaits (which they are all distinct), which direction the head bobs is a dead giveaway.

Bobbing up and down = running walk.
Bobbing side-to-side = stepping pace, rack, or hard lateral pace.

Also the hard lateral pace means that the front and hind legs are moving together at the same time on the same side of the body.

I have posted this link so many times, that I am sure people think I am related to the Grave Digger's owners but I'm not -- I don't even know them from that proverbial "load of hay".

I just LOVE this horse - plain and simple. I have the link saved at work for when I need a break -lol.

He is a TWH speed racker and something to behold; watch the entire show as he really gets going out on the road. If you have sound on your PC, be sure to turn it on and even UP if you like the music

When you get to about 3:41 seconds on the video, look at Grave Digger's head and you will notice the slight side-to-side head bob that is indicative of the rack, stepping pace or lateral pace.

Also, there is no pressure on his mouth, no froth, nothing. He is loving what he is doing

     
    01-10-2009, 10:48 PM
  #17
Weanling
Thanks, Walkinthewalk, so informative! Now I'm going to need to get some video of Annie having fun in the pasture, and maybe we can figure out if she's doing a true running walk, or more of a step-pace. She's definitely doing more of an up-and-down motion with her head that is distinctly different from when she walks. My b/f and I actually joked about her funny side-to-side "amble" when she walks on a lead. But I'll definitely look more closely after this. Thanks for the info! :)
     

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