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Question about paso fino bit!

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  • Paso Fino Bits for Sale
  • Paso fino bit explained

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    09-11-2013, 07:25 AM
  #11
Weanling
A snaffle bit is a direct action bit. This direct action has NOTHING to do with mouthpiece shape.

Bob is stuck with the idea that a "snaffle" means a jointed mouthpiece. That is demonstrably incorrect. Langdon will explain all if you let him.

Note, too, that many curb bits also have jointed mouthpieces.

G.
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    09-11-2013, 08:29 AM
  #12
Weanling
"Bob is stuck with the idea that a "snaffle" means a jointed mouthpiece"

Please DO NOT put words in my mouth. It makes no difference whether the snaffle is broken one time, 10 times or not at all, they are the worst bit in existence. Especially with horses with very little room under their tongue.

I do not know why it takes so much to get the "die hards" away from the snaffle as a bit to use for training, or anything else. We have so many comfort bits that work so much better and are so much easier on the mouth.
     
    09-11-2013, 01:36 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbsmfg3    
"Bob is stuck with the idea that a "snaffle" means a jointed mouthpiece"

Please DO NOT put words in my mouth. It makes no difference whether the snaffle is broken one time, 10 times or not at all, they are the worst bit in existence. Especially with horses with very little room under their tongue.

I do not know why it takes so much to get the "die hards" away from the snaffle as a bit to use for training, or anything else. We have so many comfort bits that work so much better and are so much easier on the mouth.
I don't put words in your mouth. I read what you write. You don't know what a snaffle bit is; or, if you do, you choose to mis-identify, mis-contrue, and misunderstand it.

Since you don't want to believe me, try this:

Snaffle bit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It's a good explanation.

G.
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    09-11-2013, 01:53 PM
  #14
Trained
You do not direct rein in a curb of any kind, but ESPECIALLY not in a bit like a spoon! Spoon bits are for FINISHED horses who need the absolute slightest signal to turn or stop. Watch someone who knows what they're doing ride in a spoon bit. They barely shift the reins at all.

I'm not sure you comprehend the leverage action caused by shanked bits. It magnifies the amount of pressure applied to the reins based on the length of the shanks. The longer the shank, the more pressure is applied to the mouthpiece.

True snaffle bits have no shanks, so therefore have no additional leverage beyond what the rider applies directly through the reins. This makes for simple, clear directions, making them ideal for training green horses. Some horses (like my gelding) don't like the two piece mouthpiece and prefer a three piece. There are also Mullen, or straight, mouthpieces with no joints. As long as they don't have shanks, they are still considered a snaffle.

Any leverage/shanked bit with a broken mouthpiece is poorly designed and shouldn't be used. You're adding leverage to the nutcracker action, which does nothing but send muddy, unclear signals. If you have a jointed leverage bit, do your horse a favor and use it as a toilet paper holder.

For a good explanation of bits and their various levels of use, might I direct you to these informative, easy-to-understand threads:
Http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack-equipment/bit-information-snaffle-english-type-bits-36522/
Http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack-equipment/bit-information-curb-western-type-bits-69588/
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    09-11-2013, 01:56 PM
  #15
Started
Bbsmfg3 - there are snaffles with no joints, and a well constructed snaffle will not pinch their tongue. I personally love mullen mouths (just a rounded mouth piece, no breaks) and oval mouth (double jointed) snaffles. The only 'issue' with single jointed snaffles is they can potentially hit the pallet of the horse's mouth, this is common in Paso's they tend to have shallow pallets. There's no reason a Paso can't be ridden in a snaffle, especially one with no joints (ported or mullened) or one with 2+ joints (ovals and french's are ideal) - especially if you're direct reining, get rid of the curb >.<
     
    09-12-2013, 02:59 PM
  #16
Weanling
I am very familiar with snaffle bits of all descriptions. I used them for many, many years.
     
    09-12-2013, 04:16 PM
  #17
Green Broke
This won't make me popular, but I direct rein in a curb all the time. So does my 70 yr old neighbor who has owned gaited horses for decades. I thought most gaited riders did.
     
    09-12-2013, 09:24 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
This won't make me popular, but I direct rein in a curb all the time. So does my 70 yr old neighbor who has owned gaited horses for decades. I thought most gaited riders did.
You can "direct rein" in a curb but the action changes the way the horse will respond and not always in a good way.

In classical equitation the snaffle is used during "basic training" and the the curb is added as part of "finishing" the horse. In the gaited world the snaffle is often ommitted entirely, to the detriment of horse and rider.

IMO a lot of "my horse won't gait" complaints flow from shortcuts in basic training for horse and rider.

G.
     
    09-17-2013, 08:49 AM
  #19
Weanling
"You do not direct rein in a curb of any kind, but ESPECIALLY not in a bit like a spoon! Spoon bits are for FINISHED horses who need the absolute slightest signal to turn or stop. Watch someone who knows what they're doing ride in a spoon bit. They barely shift the reins at all. "

Interesting comment, I just got back from a Paso trainer, who is one of the top trainers in the world. He starts his horses in the spoon. Don't know that I'd agree with starting one on the spoon. BUT, how can you argue with success.

"Any leverage/shanked bit with a broken mouthpiece is poorly designed and shouldn't be used. You're adding leverage to the nutcracker action, which does nothing but send muddy, unclear signals. If you have a jointed leverage bit, do your horse a favor and use it as a toilet paper holder."

Boy, OH Boy, is that a misguided, out of date comment. The jointed leverage bits, of the comfort bit design are the best from start to finish. Here again it's all in the hands at the end of the reigns. You can not fix bad hands with any bit. We've had several horses where the only fix they needed was a change from the fixed mouth piece, long shank bit to a comfort bit and they started responding well immediately.
     
    09-17-2013, 08:50 AM
  #20
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by featherfox    
Hello everyone,



I have read that most Pasos do not do well in snaffles. Is there any truth to this? Doesn't seem like there would be.


It was my thought that if he did not neck rein I should not use direct reins. Is this true?
I broke my Paso mare in a D-ring, she rode out nice, but she is a very goey mare and I didnt have the brakes that I wanted with her. I made a small step up to a tom thumb and have never looked back. My thought is that most pasos, walkers, QH, whatever.... are ridden in a particular bit as dictated by tradition, moreso than function. I have ridden horses of all types that didn't respond to a certain type of bit. You may just have to sort through a pile of bits and find a middle ground that makes you both happy.

I will say that my Paso mare is the most finicky horse I have ever dealt with in regard to tack changes, I assume that, this is more an idividual thing, than a breed thing.

Jim
     

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