Rocky trots in field - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 01:10 PM Thread Starter
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Rocky trots in field

I have two yearling Registered Rocky Mountain horses. One will hit a gait and go into a trot. He seems to trot more than he gaits. The other yearling I have not seen trot. He will gait up to the point he goes into a canter. Do I have anything to worry about with the first horse not gaiting when I break him.
Any feed back would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 01:42 PM
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This is not uncommon. If the horse has the "gait" genetically it will come out under saddle.

G.
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post #3 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 02:16 PM Thread Starter
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Great....
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post #4 of 11 Old 06-17-2011, 10:19 PM
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A gaited horse who trots is generally easier to bring the gait out in, (especially in Rockies) than a pacey horse. Watch the one you see gaiting in the field closely, often they aren't gaiting and instead are pacing.

A woman can NEVER have too many horses.....
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post #5 of 11 Old 06-18-2011, 12:38 PM Thread Starter
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isn't a pace a fast trot?
I'm pretty sure he's gaiting though.
The one that trots will gait slowly, but when he speeds up faster than a running walk he trots'
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post #6 of 11 Old 06-18-2011, 08:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wchapman4 View Post
isn't a pace a fast trot?
I'm pretty sure he's gaiting though.
The one that trots will gait slowly, but when he speeds up faster than a running walk he trots'
And that is perfectly normal. Rockies and Kentucky Mountain often don't fill out completely or muscle up until they are 4. My gelding was a scrawny kid that wanted to trot rather than gait, so I slowed him down making him walk, especially up and down hills. This year I am rewarded with a 4 year old who will drop into a wonderful smooth gait with a beautiful head tuck. When he is in a huge hurry he will try to drop into a trot, but I make him slow down then. Patience is the key to a great gait on the trail.

But the minute he goes out with the other horses he will trot like the rest of them.

A woman can NEVER have too many horses.....
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post #7 of 11 Old 06-18-2011, 08:52 PM
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I am pretty green myself, but a pace is not a fast trot. Totally different. With a pace both legs on the same side are moving in unison. Like a train.
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post #8 of 11 Old 06-18-2011, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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so your saying he will gait but it will be slow. Will he speed up once he gets older and a few trail miles on him. When I break him do I just keep him in the gait and he should get faster?
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post #9 of 11 Old 06-18-2011, 11:50 PM
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Originally Posted by wchapman4 View Post
so your saying he will gait but it will be slow. Will he speed up once he gets older and a few trail miles on him. When I break him do I just keep him in the gait and he should get faster?
Within limits, yes.

All gaited horses have a range of speed where they can maintain a proper form for their gait. If you exceed that range they will lose form and move to a different gait. This new gait may be less comfortable for horse and/or rider. At the extreme they will either trot or pace.

One of the most common errors with gaited horses is going too fast. Then complaining that the ride was "rough" and then start messing with stuff (tack, hoof angles, shoes, devices, etc.) to "smooth out" the gait. When all they really need to do is slow down.

A horse ridden regularly will be stronger and fitter and better able to handle a modestly larger range of speed. For most gaited horses the gait is done for distance, not speed. There are a few "speed" gaits (the flying tolt, speed rack, etc.) but in the main if you want to go faster then use an easy canter. It will, in almost all cases, be more energy efficient for the horse.

G.
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post #10 of 11 Old 06-19-2011, 09:21 AM
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Thank you Guilherme, and I think one of the main things in any horse is that all youngsters first have to relearn their balance when they have the added pounds of a rider on their back.

You summed it up quite well in the fact all horses have a range to the speed of their gait. You cannot expect a Rocky (and yes I know their are exceptions) to have the speed of a racking horse which is bred primarily for speed with distance.

The main thing to remember in gaiting is condition, condition, condition.

A woman can NEVER have too many horses.....
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