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Stopping a TWH

This is a discussion on Stopping a TWH within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

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        10-31-2012, 09:55 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    You don't say where you are located, but consider a Mangalarga Marchador.

    They ride like regular horses (no special equitation techniques or equipment required). They can have three different ways of going.

    First is the marcha batida, a broken trot. Not as smooth as a lateral gait, but very well suited to athletic disciplines (endurance, eventing, cattle work, etc.).

    Next is the marcha picada, a broken pace (similar to a stepping pace in a Walker). Very well suited to trail riding or any discipline where there is not a lot of lateral movement required.

    Finally, the marcha de centro. This is almost identical to the running walk of a 1930s era Walker. It is a good "distance gait." It allows reasonable lateral movement. It is very comfortable to ride for long periods (for both horse and rider).

    A Marchador can be influenced in way of going by equipment, shoeing, or equitation practices. In this it is like every other gaited breed. But kept and ridden in a classical manner gives excellent performance without imposing a heavy burden on the horse.

    Go to Welcome! | U.S. Mangalarga Marchador Association (USMMA) for more information.

    G.
         
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        10-31-2012, 10:19 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Another thing I forgot,

    My mare can break into a pace, so to get her out of it I either pull up a bit to collect her back to the running walk, apparantly does the same thing when aiming for the canter, she breaks to a gallop then one has to pull her back into a collected canter (i have yet to get gutsy and go for the gallop)

    But once you get them to gait it's just like anything else that they have to build up the stamina to maintain
         
        10-31-2012, 11:27 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    Quote:"Good riding is good riding. You sit a gaited horse like you sit any other horse: square, in the middle. If you're going to jump then shorten your stirrup a bit. For long trail rides drop them a notch (will ease the pressure on your knees). Not all gaited horses are trained this way, but they should be. " EndQuote

    Gaited horses have different gaits than trot, canter horses, and require a different seat. If you sit a gaited horse like you do a trotting horse you may cause them to start trotting. The gaited seat is a more relaxed, sit back a bit and move your legs forward a bit. It's just enough different to aid in helping them gait, just like the forward seat, aids in helping a trotting horse trot.

    The majority of the gaited horses do better with some contact with the bit. Not nearly as much as some TWH folks would like to use, but some. If you get ahold of one that has been taught with a lot of pressure, you may have a very difficult time retraining them. It can be done, but requires a very good trainer, and you have to start their training all over, from the ground up. And with some, it's nearly impossible to fix.
    tbrantley likes this.
         
        11-03-2012, 11:29 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    A lot of Walkers bred these days are rackers and "single footers". They ARE fast. If you want a Walker not trained for speed racking, you have to train one yourself, before a show barn gets a hold of them.

    A lot of people don't necessarily train their horses to be balanced and end up with horses heavy on the forehand. You end up finding a lot of horses that break gait and pace. Even natural gaiters will sometimes break down to a pace because the horse is unbalanced, or the rider doesnt know how to keep the gait. I rode a Foxtrotter that had a lovely natural gait, but if I let her go to fast, she would fall out and pace. I had never ridden a Foxtrotter before, so it was a learning experience for me as a beginner/intermidiate level rider.

    I was surprised to find that the Foxtrot and Paso gait can be fast enough to keep up with a medium trot. Although I shouldnt be, true pacers, like Standardbreds, can pace fast enough to keep up with a nongaited gallop.
         
        11-03-2012, 11:45 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bbsmfg3    

    Gaited horses have different gaits than trot, canter horses, and require a different seat. If you sit a gaited horse like you do a trotting horse you may cause them to start trotting. The gaited seat is a more relaxed, sit back a bit and move your legs forward a bit. It's just enough different to aid in helping them gait, just like the forward seat, aids in helping a trotting horse
    My instructor and I have found that biomechanical riding with gaited horses, especially Walkers, actually has an impressive improvement. We got better responses to cues, better flexion and balance than riding with a traditional gaited and even traditional dressage seat.
         
        11-04-2012, 07:42 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joidigm    
    My instructor and I have found that biomechanical riding with gaited horses, especially Walkers, actually has an impressive improvement. We got better responses to cues, better flexion and balance than riding with a traditional gaited and even traditional dressage seat.
    I've not heard of "biomechanical riding" before. Could you please elaborate?

    G.
         
        11-04-2012, 11:43 AM
      #17
    Weanling
    It is the study of human and horse mechanical function and how one can influence the other. Humans and horses don't move the same way, but we know that human movement on horseback can help or hinder the horses natural mechanical movement.

    I havent dabbled in it enough to explain properly, but last year when I was working with an older exshow Walker that had trouble with flexion through circles, lets say traveling in a right hand 20m ci, we would get an uneven circle. Doing something as little as dropping my outside hip (but keeping the shoulder lifted) improved the consistency of the circle, because shifting my hip, shifted how the horse walked and balanced through the turn.
         
        11-04-2012, 05:35 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Oh, you mean Classical Equitation!!!

    I rather suspected that was the case. Sadly, much of the equitation practiced in the "gaited" community is just bad riding. Combine this with a real lack of understanding of equine biomechanics and you've got a recipe for horses in constant pain.

    One of the best "how to" books out there is Vol. I (Education of the Rider) of the Horsemanship and Horsemastership series. This was the textbook used at the U.S. Cavalry School at Ft. Riley from 1935 to the end of the Horse Cavalry in 1948. It is very well written and, when combined with Vol II (Education of the Horse) you have all the written material you need to effectively ride and train any horse (gaited or trotter). Purchase them from the Suttler's Store at the U.S. Cavalry Association website, U.S.Cavalry Association: Fort Riley, KS Hit "Shop" and the book is on the second row of "featured products." It will cost you $13.95 plus shipping. If you want to get the rest of the story, purchase the three DVDs that were used to train troopers in those days.

    If you really want to go deep in this then get Give Your Horse A Chance by Lt. Col. A.L. D'Endrody. The author was the Chief of Cavalry Instruction for Hungarian Army in the 1930s. Silver Medalist at Berlin in 1936, IIRC. He didn't teach students; he taught instructors to teach students. This book is not light reading but it has more content than any equestrian text book I've ever seen.

    These, plus good ground coaching, will allow you go get maximum performance from your horse no matter the gait (lateral, centered, or diagonal).

    G.
    Malda likes this.
         
        11-05-2012, 08:34 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    Not classical equitation. Classical riding has its principals like any other seat style. Some thoughts on biomechanical riding actually work against the style of classical riding, or atleast the classical that I am learning. Some biomechanical schools of thought use a classical seat balanced on a pelvic triangle, other biomechanical s.o.t. Use a more western style of sitting back on the seat pockets.

    I understand that equitation is about maximum performance of the horse. The new system seems to me more focused on the biomechanics of the rider and how the rider affects the biomechanic systems of the horse. Yes the goal is the same, the horse, but through a new take on a different avenue.
         
        11-05-2012, 09:12 AM
      #20
    Showing
    Malda, always ask to see the registration paper and be sure the description matches the horse you are looking at. The year of birth is on there. Also, learn how to read the upper eye tooth and the slope of the teeth. If you barely cup your hand that is a young horse when his upper and lower front teeth align like that. They are small compared to a horse in mid teens. If the teeth appear longer lift the lip on the side and look for a line on the eye tooth. It starts at the gum line as an indentation then with each passing year it gets longer. At 19 it will have run the length of the tooth. At 20 the line is gone. The front teeth will align on about a 45 degree angle and appear quite long. After the line in the tooth disappears it's anybody's guess as to the horse's age altho there are other signs one looks for.
         

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