Stopping a TWH - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Stopping a TWH

This is a discussion on Stopping a TWH within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

    Like Tree9Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        11-05-2012, 09:22 AM
      #21
    Weanling
    Hi :) I have a MFT and he has a very fast walk and wants to GO GO GO!! But he always stops the instant I put a slight pressure on the reins--- But I do ride in a hackamore.. so not sure if that would effect the horse compared to a bit? I ride in a very soft hackamore, so there is hardly any pressure applied :)
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        11-25-2012, 08:44 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    I ride twh, and racking horses. I like for my horses to move out because they are smooth and I enjoy the ride. I don't have any trouble getting them to stop. I just tell them to ease up and they will go into a flat walk . I want them to stop drop their reins to their neck and relax my legs and seat and they stop. My horses speed up if I put a little pressure on the reins to collect them up and I click to them to go faster.

    I sit in my saddle differently then when I rode quarter horses. It is hard for me to explain but I feel like I am collecting up when I want the horse to collect up and I relax when I want the horse to relax and go it to a slow walk or stop. I have very little trouble with my horses staying in the proper gait when they are in shape and use to being ridden on a regular basis. If my horses are out of shape or young and haven't developed their muscles yet, I take it slow and allow them time to learn the proper gait as well as develop their muscles.

    Even my young two year old knows that to slow down I will say ease up and to stop I drop the reins down after she has slowed down.

    My horses have been trained to stop with whoa but if they are racking and come to a sudden stop some riders will fly over their heads so we don't usually say whoa at a racking speed. LOL...

    I don't use any special shoes and my bit is usually a snaffle if I am the one that broke them. If I buy one already broke, then I usually have to retrained them to get them in a snaffle.


    It's my opinion that you need to know how to ride a gaited horse for them to be able to perform their gait right. I have watched many people mess up a natural gaited horse because they did not know how to ride a gaited horse correctly, it ususally depended on how off balance the person was and their size. My husband has a way of bringing out the best in gaited horses, he knows how to sit in the saddle and colllect them up without getting into their mouth. Just like you need to know how to sit in the seat correctly for different disciplines.

    I do wish you luck on finding the right horse for you. I love my gaited horses but I did have to take lessons on how to ride them correctly so that I can allow them to do the gait that they were bred to do. It was well worth it.
         
        11-26-2012, 12:04 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Quote: "A lot of Walkers bred these days are rackers and "single footers"
    "
    Let's not forget the rack and the single foot are the same gait. 2 names for the same thing.


    Quote: "One of the best "how to" books out there is Vol. I (Education of the Rider) of the Horsemanship and Horsemastership series. This was the textbook used at the U.S. Cavalry School at Ft. Riley from 1935 to the end of the Horse Cavalry in 1948. It is very well written and, when combined with Vol II (Education of the Horse) you have all the written material you need to effectively ride and train any horse (gaited or trotter)."

    Negative, these books were written for the trotting horse NOT the gaited horse. They are different. If you ride a gaited horse like you would a trotting horse you will be teaching the horse to trot, via, the seat and riding method.

    Very, very, few dressage riders, that are really good dressage riders, can ride a gaited horse and keep it gaiting. The riding methods of the dressage discipline is for trotting horses. It does not take a dressage rider very long to completely ruin the gaits of even the best gaited horse. Most, really good dressage riders are not willing to change, period.
         
        12-02-2012, 06:51 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Thanks for your responses. Sorry I didn't get back to this thread for awhile.

    Update: Last month I put down my SSH who had Wobbler's Syndrome. :( So sad to see him go, he was an excellent trail horse, but there's not much you can do for it. And since Wobbler's horses fall a lot, putting him in a pasture was not an option.

    I bought an Icelandic a couple of weeks ago! I'll put pictures of both horses in the Gaited Breeds Pics section (if I can figure out how). He's older than I wanted, 14 years, but I'm not young either. :) I was actually looking at any gaited horse who fit my criteria, then a friend saw an ad for Schmalztoph Icelandic farm which is no longer breeding and selling off their horses (might still have some left, look up the farm if you are interested), so they were going for low prices. It's the only way I could have afforded one. BTW, I've learned by trying other icelandics that they also are taught to go faster with more pressure on the reins. Had to turn a couple of the into the fence to get them to stop. Strange thing to train, IMO.

    BTW, I think there was some confusion about gaiting. Some people who were kind enough to respond thought I was the reason the horses weren't gaiting. Most gaited horses do not gait, so I was trying out horses who had paced their entire lives. This is why I was only getting a few gaiting steps out of these horses, it would take time to build up the muscle to hold the gait for a distance.
         
        12-02-2012, 09:35 PM
      #25
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bbsmfg3    
    quote: "A lot of Walkers bred these days are rackers and "single footers"
    "
    Let's not forget the rack and the single foot are the same gait. 2 names for the same thing.


    Quote: "One of the best "how to" books out there is Vol. I (Education of the Rider) of the Horsemanship and Horsemastership series. This was the textbook used at the U.S. Cavalry School at Ft. Riley from 1935 to the end of the Horse Cavalry in 1948. It is very well written and, when combined with Vol II (Education of the Horse) you have all the written material you need to effectively ride and train any horse (gaited or trotter)."

    Negative, these books were written for the trotting horse NOT the gaited horse. They are different. If you ride a gaited horse like you would a trotting horse you will be teaching the horse to trot, via, the seat and riding method.

    Very, very, few dressage riders, that are really good dressage riders, can ride a gaited horse and keep it gaiting. The riding methods of the dressage discipline is for trotting horses. It does not take a dressage rider very long to completely ruin the gaits of even the best gaited horse. Most, really good dressage riders are not willing to change, period.


    So true. I had a dressage background and now have had a TWH for 8years. It was hard work to learn not to work, LOL. It seems like it's a different center of balance to ride this breed, and learning how not to interfere with their natural gait,, and how to develop it.
         
        12-03-2012, 01:38 AM
      #26
    twp
    Banned
    Ours stops immediately, and all you have to do is say the word "Whoa" I guess, just back them up a few steps, and say the command before you do the action, so they know what you want from them.. Walkers are..Different.. lol. I usually Just ride in a halter, but it's the same response, when I ride with the bit.
         
        12-03-2012, 05:47 AM
      #27
    Foal
    I think this is what happened to the walker that I tried who turned out to have a wonderful running walk, even on a loose rein. The owners/trainer told me he only paced when I got on him. He did pace once around the arena, so I stopped him, then power-walked him for a couple minutes and he went right into his running walk and wouldn't let it go. I remember thinking it must have taken a lot of work to undo this horse's gait. Unfortunately, he was 16.1 hh which is too big for me for a trail horse.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
    So true. I had a dressage background and now have had a TWH for 8years. It was hard work to learn not to work, LOL. It seems like it's a different center of balance to ride this breed, and learning how not to interfere with their natural gait,, and how to develop it.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    stopping banman Barrel Racing 2 07-18-2011 05:17 PM
    Not Stopping SissyGoBob Horse Training 5 06-01-2011 10:49 AM
    Stopping eccodecco Horse Training 7 04-02-2011 08:36 AM
    Stopping by to say Hi! ArabianDream Meet the Community 4 10-28-2010 10:50 PM
    Just Stopping By aBreeze Meet the Community 2 04-17-2007 03:16 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:32 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0