Teaching non gaited horses to rack? - Page 3
   

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Teaching non gaited horses to rack?

This is a discussion on Teaching non gaited horses to rack? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
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  • Can you teach a quarter horse to gait

 
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    12-29-2008, 08:51 PM
  #21
Zab
Yearling
(btw it's quite funny how concerned I am about his gait, what it should be called, how ''pure'' it is and what others would think about it - when I'm far away from my horse. And when I ride him, all that just seem so un-important and I can only sit there and smile :P)
     
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    12-29-2008, 11:29 PM
  #22
Started
Well I am terribly sorry to give you so much unwanted knowledge.

Saddlebreds grow out of their rack. If it is desired, they are trained to perform the gaits undersaddle. If not, they are not trained to perform them, and they don't do it.

With Saddlebreds it is considerd a Trained Gait. You asked about training non gaited horses to rack. Since most Saddlebreds are trotters(meaning they grow out of thier rack), if they are to rack undersaddle, it must be trained. I'm sorry if I misunderstood. The question seemed pretty clear.

A true rack is a four beat lateral gait performed at speed. Your picture seems like he is, in fact actually racking. He looks quick. The key is speed.

Here is a list and definition of the gaits, from my favorite book:

The walk is a slow, flat footed, four beat gait.

The trot is a two beat gait, in which the diagonal fore and hind legs act together.

The pace . . . Is a rapid, two beat gait in which the lateral fore and hind legs work together.

The amble is a lateral gait usually distinguished from the pace by being slower and morebroken in cadence.

The rack is a fast, flashy, lateral four beat gait. It was once defined by the discarded name "single foot"

The gallop is a fast, three beat gait, in which two diagonal legs are paired, their single beat falling between the successive beats of the other two legs.

The canter is a three beat gait done under restraint. Sequence is the same as the gallop.

The running walk is a slow single-foot or four beat gait, with the break in the impact or rhythm occurring between diagonal fore and hind feet. In the stepping pace, which is also a slow, four beat gait, the break in the impact occurrs between the lateral fore and rear feet.

The foxtrot is a short, broken, nodding, somewhat uncollected trot, a gait sometimes used as a substitute for the running walk.

It is not easy to do, and it is not easy to explain. The best way to know is to actually watch a Saddlebred being gaited. You must affect thier balance. It takes a lot of time, patience, and above all knowledge to be able to teach it.

By the way, those Arab pictures are pretty dang cool!
     
    12-30-2008, 12:05 AM
  #23
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer    
Well I am terribly sorry to give you so much unwanted knowledge.

Saddlebreds grow out of their rack. If it is desired, they are trained to perform the gaits undersaddle. If not, they are not trained to perform them, and they don't do it.

With Saddlebreds it is considerd a Trained Gait. You asked about training non gaited horses to rack. Since most Saddlebreds are trotters(meaning they grow out of thier rack), if they are to rack undersaddle, it must be trained. I'm sorry if I misunderstood. The question seemed pretty clear.

A true rack is a four beat lateral gait performed at speed. Your picture seems like he is, in fact actually racking. He looks quick. The key is speed.

Here is a list and definition of the gaits, from my favorite book:

The walk is a slow, flat footed, four beat gait.

The trot is a two beat gait, in which the diagonal fore and hind legs act together.

The pace . . . Is a rapid, two beat gait in which the lateral fore and hind legs work together.

The amble is a lateral gait usually distinguished from the pace by being slower and morebroken in cadence.

The rack is a fast, flashy, lateral four beat gait. It was once defined by the discarded name "single foot"

The gallop is a fast, three beat gait, in which two diagonal legs are paired, their single beat falling between the successive beats of the other two legs.

The canter is a three beat gait done under restraint. Sequence is the same as the gallop.

The running walk is a slow single-foot or four beat gait, with the break in the impact or rhythm occurring between diagonal fore and hind feet. In the stepping pace, which is also a slow, four beat gait, the break in the impact occurrs between the lateral fore and rear feet.

The foxtrot is a short, broken, nodding, somewhat uncollected trot, a gait sometimes used as a substitute for the running walk.

It is not easy to do, and it is not easy to explain. The best way to know is to actually watch a Saddlebred being gaited. You must affect thier balance. It takes a lot of time, patience, and above all knowledge to be able to teach it.

By the way, those Arab pictures are pretty dang cool!
I just can't be clear, can I? You might have noticed that I changed my mind while I wrote and actually said that I appreciate your posts? ;)

But they still have the gait as foals? I don't know much of saddlebreds. But then it seems that they have it in there anyway?

So then he is racking :) He can go way faster than that, it get's pacy but it's definetly 4 beat.

But what's the differense between amble, piggy pace and stepping pace?
Is there a quite fast stepping pace? Crow does something in trot speed that I thought was stepping pace, it's too comfy to be piggy pace, slightly broken but too pacy to be rack?
     
    12-30-2008, 07:15 AM
  #24
Showing
Zab, sorry if we got away from the original post. I think the question you are asking is if a horse that does not have a natural rack, such as an Arabian, or a Quarter Horse, or a Thoroughbred, can be taught that gait and how would you go about doing it?
     
    12-30-2008, 08:09 AM
  #25
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Zab, sorry if we got away from the original post. I think the question you are asking is if a horse that does not have a natural rack, such as an Arabian, or a Quarter Horse, or a Thoroughbred, can be taught that gait and how would you go about doing it?
Yes.
Because I've seen filmclips of several racking arabians and I've never heard of them racking..
And I'm not interested in trying any methods to teach it since my horse does it all by himself :)

And I don't mind (even if I want to know).

I just seem to be in one of those periods where everyone gets annoyed and/or confused of what I say. I'm not more stupid than that I see that as I'm the only link between all annoyed and confused people, it must be something I do that causes it. ;) But the more I try to explain, the more I get people confused.
Except a quiet frustration by not managing to get myself understood correctly, I'm in a quite good, relaxed mood and have been all the time.
And it's not just a languae barrier, the same things happen in the swedish forums and even IRL (tho IRL my friends know me well enough and can read my face better than on internet ;)
It'll pass soon I guess, it has happened before and usually just last for a few months.
     
    12-30-2008, 08:24 AM
  #26
Green Broke
Some Arabs do rack naturally, they just aren't very common. I guess the real question should be "SHOULD" you teach a non-gaited horse to rack?" I would assume that if they don't do it naturally, they shouldn't - stress on the joints, etc. I think you should enhance one that's natural, not force one that isn't. I'm not trying to offend anyone, and I'm definitely not against gaited horses (I love them, even though I do hunters) but I have a horse now that isn't gaited and some trainer tried to force him and basically he had a meltdown and we picked him up as a rescue because he was damaged physically and mentally from it. Took him months to get over the physical strain and he still isn't over it mentally and this is going on 4 years...(but with all fairness, it could be attributed as much to the bad trainer as the forced racking, I suppose)
     
    12-30-2008, 08:27 AM
  #27
Zab
Yearling
Do you know how it was trained?
Special tacks or tools?
Or just methods with normal tack?
Or...?

Forcing and stressing horses are never good.. :/ At least he came to a better place. )
     
    12-30-2008, 02:12 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Food for thought: some breeds just aren't made to rack - QH's TB's (etc.) conformation is not conducive to the rack - and it is extremely hard (and darned near impossible) to teach one to rack like a TWH or a saddlebred :)
     
    01-01-2009, 10:34 AM
  #29
Weanling
Ihave an arabian 11 yr old and he can do something idk what he does but when I slow him down a lil he goes really smoothly.hes a fullblooded arabian.
     
    01-01-2009, 12:48 PM
  #30
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
Do you know how it was trained?
Special tacks or tools?
Or just methods with normal tack?
Or...?

Forcing and stressing horses are never good.. :/ At least he came to a better place. )
I think only certain horses can be taught to rack. The arabians I posted already had an interesting gait to begin with that they were able to alter into a rack.
     

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