Thinking about a gaited breed - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 46 Old 07-22-2011, 04:40 AM
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I love gaited horse their confortable!
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post #22 of 46 Old 07-22-2011, 05:51 AM
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What a beautiful horse and sweet to boot ? Better jump on that one.
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post #23 of 46 Old 07-23-2011, 10:27 PM
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Tennessee Walkiing Horses are fantastic, they're great for trail and they have fantastic personalities, I have a TWH named Taco and he is the sweetest thing ever but sometimes he can get a little cranky when he can't eat haha but overall they're great horses and you should really look into them
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post #24 of 46 Old 09-02-2011, 10:09 AM
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For me the Georgian Grande was a good gaited choice. You'll need to shop for size. They can be about 15 hds on the small side and over 17 hds on the tall side.
I picked them because I wanted to get back to long distance riding when I retire. My previous distance riding was done on my late AQH. Getting older I appreciate the gaits of the ASB and TWH, but they tended to be a little lankier and lighter. I needed something a little bigger boned for my long distance riding. I use the old US Cav rule of 20% of the horses weight is what they should carry. Time limits pretty much restricted the distances I could travel in the past. With retirement I won't have those restrictions, so I wanted gaited horse with the size, endurance and an easy keeper to ride on longer trips. My Friesian/Saddlebred fits the bill for me.
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post #25 of 46 Old 09-02-2011, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by its lbs not miles View Post
For me the Georgian Grande was a good gaited choice. You'll need to shop for size. They can be about 15 hds on the small side and over 17 hds on the tall side.
I picked them because I wanted to get back to long distance riding when I retire. My previous distance riding was done on my late AQH. Getting older I appreciate the gaits of the ASB and TWH, but they tended to be a little lankier and lighter. I needed something a little bigger boned for my long distance riding. I use the old US Cav rule of 20% of the horses weight is what they should carry. Time limits pretty much restricted the distances I could travel in the past. With retirement I won't have those restrictions, so I wanted gaited horse with the size, endurance and an easy keeper to ride on longer trips. My Friesian/Saddlebred fits the bill for me.
If the Cavalry ever paid attention to the 20% rule it was to ignore it.

The Remount Standard from about 1906 on was a 15-16 hand, TB type horse weighing 900-1100 pounds. The field or campaign weight (rider, tack, weapons, etc.) ranged from 230-250 lbs. Do the math and you'll see how much the "20% Rule" was respected.

The British pack at the time ran 250-280 lbs. and the Germans and Austrians could run to 300 lbs. plus. The Continental armies often used a slightly larger horse (Trakhener, Holsteiner, etc.) but they still regularly broke 20%.

G.
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post #26 of 46 Old 09-02-2011, 02:52 PM
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Think about being a horse for a minute.
Dang if I wouldn't hate to have to carry around 25% of my body weight
in addition to my own weight all the time.
Oops. Wait a minute. I may be carrying around 25% extra all the time. As body fat.
Maybe that explains my sore feet.

Celeste
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post #27 of 46 Old 09-03-2011, 12:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeste View Post
Think about being a horse for a minute.
Dang if I wouldn't hate to have to carry around 25% of my body weight
in addition to my own weight all the time.
Oops. Wait a minute. I may be carrying around 25% extra all the time. As body fat.
Maybe that explains my sore feet.
The average infantry soldier or Marine weighs around 170-180 lbs. and the current field load (weapon, body armor, pack, etc.) runs close to 80 lbs. Do the math on that!!!

We humans, with our upright carriage, can carry a very significant percentage of our body weight without suffering serious consequences. The horse, with a back built like a suspension bridge, can carry propotionately much less.

The "20% rule" has been around for a very long time but really has little meaning out of context.

G.
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post #28 of 46 Old 09-03-2011, 03:02 AM
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The 20% rule was established as best for the horse. The reality of what things weighed don't always cooperate. And the Army has always done things it's own way.
Medical experts told the Army for years how to reduce shin spllints, but it wasn't until the late 1980's that they started being listened to.

The math:
Around 1900 the prefered weight of a US Cav trooper was under 150lbs, probably averaging about 140 (they watched weight for troopers then just like they do height of pilots now....Maximum allowed weight was 165, but over 150 was suppose to be the exception...probably done for the sake of some officers :)) ). Saddle, carbine, etc... (equipement) came out to 90 lbs. Average Cav mount in 1900 was just over 1,000lbs. (Morgans and Saddlebreds were popular probably for their size, endurance and gait, but any horse that measured up could serve)
That would put the average weight carried just under 24%. And while no doubt some went over 25%, more were likely to be closer to 22%. Not a bad ratio when taking into account that you're dealing with the military.
European nations had different requirements and made fewer long range demands on their Cav, so weight was less of an issue
If you can find it, "Horse, Saddles, and Bridles", by Col W. Carter is an informative read. He wrote it around 1900, so it might not be to easy to come across, but Amazon might have it.

As for carrying 20% (or 25%) of our weight. We don't to have test our endurance by traveling 300 miles in 5 days carrying over 20% of our weight (a qualifying test for Cav horses). Somewhere I'd read about an even more demanding one of 100 miles in one day caring about 30%, but I'm not so sure about that one.

As for the 170lb + ground pounders of today. We are larger then we were over 100 years ago. Well, some are. I was 147lb at my ETS physical. Gee, I just could make the qualifying size for a horse solder, but they didn't have the horse Cav then (I'm not that old). :)) Very accurate comparison between humans and horses with regard to effect of carrying loads. Riding a horses is actually not the most effecient means of travel (taking into account the feed, care, etc...). Better off having it pull a wagon. Slower, but more effecient. But for me riding is a lot more fun than walking the whole way. And wagons are more restrictive.

Still, today I can find saddles of the same weight and lighter gear (I don't need the carbine and ammo), so at 160-165lb + saddle and equipment I can keep it to 20% (especially with my 1300lb mare :)) ) Obviously a healthy horse, with no more demands than most of todays riders make could probably manage 30%, but I prefer not to push it. Not many people ride 60 miles every day for 5 days (I know I've never done 60 in one day....50, 30 years ago, but never 60).

Very glad to see that there is someone else out there who takes the time and intrest to looking into the weight we ask our mounts to carry. I never really worry about it for one day rides of 20 miles or less. I think any healthy, conditioned horse with a proper fitting saddle can probably carry at least 30% with no problem. For me weight only becomes an issue with long distances that require many days. As I point out to my children. For long distance, week long rides it's not distance that will do the horse in, but the weight you make it carry. (So we won't take the caste iron pots on those rides) :))
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post #29 of 46 Old 09-03-2011, 10:40 AM
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To the OP-I have both rode and drove 2 different 3-gaited Saddlebreds, in fact I helped to train both to drive. The horses were full sisters and had a lot of Dressage training and showing in Dresssage tests before being put into driving training. Each of the mares were a little over 15hh each. I do/did so throughly enjoy driving as well as riding.
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post #30 of 46 Old 09-03-2011, 10:50 AM
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From what I know, TWH are good a pulling, even off roading. My saddle club has several members, now to old to mount up, that take all the trails with us in a two or four man buggy pulled by one or two TWH. They are a great breed and buying a young horse that has "flunked" out of a training barn often makes for a great horse with a dreamy gait.
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