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Trotting gaited horses?

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  • Natural gaited foxtrotters
  • Gaited horse prefers trot

 
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    06-20-2009, 07:36 PM
  #11
Weanling
My TN Walker trots under saddle and at liberty. I don't ask for the trot anymore with him b/c I'm going to teach him to go bridleless one day in the future and I can't sit it w/o a saddle :) I'll slide right off it's so bumpy.
     
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    06-21-2009, 10:19 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Gaiting Issue "Cures"

Gaited horses (except for Saddlebreds) do not gait. Period. If they do, it is either a conformation issue, bit/contact problem, or the horse is dog tired. And why would you want a horse that was specifically BRED to gait, trot? If the horse is having issues, here are some ways to help/enhance it if you are having problems with it:

Well, there are many things you can do. First, collection. Yes,many gaited horses can gait PERFECTLY FINE without contact, but--if you ARE having problems with their gait, try collecting them (not to be confused with being in their mouths). When you collect them, try asking for a faster pace.
Secondly, DO NOT LEAN FORWARD! When riding TWHs it's best to use a nice DEEP seat. When a horse gaits, it's butt is lowered. I find whenever my horse is having a "lazy gaiting day", if you maybe raise a rein next to their butt or tap them with it (not hit or beat),they will lower their butts and smoothe out. But make sure they don't get used to this--then they may begin ignoreing it or fearing it, depending on how you choose to use it.
Try not to use leg chains. Even though there are some light humane chains out there, it's best just to stick with more subtle or nicer aids.
Thirdly, you could change the shoes or toe length. There are TWH shoers out there if you wanted to maybe try it. Throughout my experience with TWHs, it has never really changed anything and I'm sure WE wouldn't like to carry around an 8 pound shoe, let alone a horse. And they've got 4 of them! You could also change the toe length. We've always kept our Walker's hooves pretty long out of tradition, but that dosen't mean you always should. My SSH tripped for the longest time--ever since we had him, and we always thought that it was just him not picking up his feet. It turned out that his feet were just too LONG. We cut them pretty short and he gaits just fine with them. (Of course ALL horses are different--some things might work for your horse that didn't work for us--who knows!)
Another thing you could do is (and I know people are probably not going to like this, but it HAS helped different people's horses) change the bit. Even though they are expensive, at least just TRY a different selection. You don't necesarilly have to change permanently. Just go around and see what you think. You may find out that just a plain snaffle of some kind works the best! (but DO NOT use a Tom Thumb--there has been many a conflict over those death traps--and I see now how horrible they are!)
And lastly (and I'm sure not leastly) you can try a different saddle. Gaited saddles are great saddles to try; designed especially for the movement of their body. Also, as seen in showing, the cutback saddle is a good saddle to practice in. It allows free movement in their shoulders, and gives the rider a deep seat which is BEST for a gaited horse.
Don't expect for it to be perfect overnight. It may take a lot of riding mileage and practice.

     
    06-21-2009, 10:28 PM
  #13
Weanling
I have a TWH that can't trot.... to unbalanced so I don't haha
     
    06-21-2009, 10:47 PM
  #14
Started
My first horse was a large mutt pony, Morgan to look at but with enough gaited blood of some variety to give him the world's wackiest pace. He could walk, trot, pace, and canter. The pace was certainly smoother (weird to ride, but smoother), but I did do some tiny local shows with him so I encouraged the trot, which was like riding a bucking jackhammer. It was gorgeous to watch, and easy to rise to, but I switched to English riding since I could not sit it (I came from the Western QH world, and I'm pretty darn good at sitting even a fast trot). We went through spells, though, of insistent and incureable pacing. I would no sooner think that the pacing days were behind us, when he would fly into that pace! I could have dealt with the gait, but all the lovely softness and flexibility in his mouth and body went right out the window. He ran around the arena like a Standie on the track if he got nervous, lol. Trotting never did come quite naturally to him, he always had trouble turning without downshifting to the walk.
     
    06-22-2009, 03:55 PM
  #15
Zab
Yearling
Sunny86:
I don't agree. Maybe because I've grown up around icelandics, which both trots, racks and pace, but all horses can trot. Walk, trot and canter/gallop is the three main gaits and all horses knows them, then some knows another gait, or pace, too.. Many icelandics prefer trot over rack, untill they're trained, and equally many prefer rack and is almost imposdible to trot in the start.. but they learn it. And sure. A horse that has never trotted before is probably unbalanced and has a bad trot.. just as a horse that never has had a rider on his back is unbalanced.. and that's something you train. Trot is a good gait to work a horse in to build good muscles, as well.

With icelandics, and my standardbred, it's like this; if you gait too much the gait gets pacy, if you trot too much it gets more digonal. But if you work in both gaits, both trot and gait improove... I believe it's much the same with all breeds and horses, you can use the gaits to complement each other. As long as you manage to teach the horse to differ from the trot-cue and the gaiting-cue.. >_> Which is where I fail with Crow at the moment..

It's funny what you say, because they say the exact same thing about my standie (we ''only' have gaited icelandics here, and that's the only breed ''allowed'' to gait, everything else must be wrong. They've seen one standie that paced when he got nervous and that means all standies only pace because they're nervous.. it has nothing to do with training.. ;) but reversed: "Any horse that gaits does it because he's tired, tense or not strong enough to trot'' well, unless it's an icelandic then :P

But however if you prefer to use the trot or not s a completely different thing.. I think it's healthy to use the gaits a horse has, but that's just me. And I do see the problem with doing both and trying to get it right.. which is why I'm thinking about quitting the trot, at least or now.. even tho his trot is great.. Anyway..

Trying different bits is always an option, I've used everything to sidepulls or hackamores to snaffles and spanish curbs, and combinations. But I wish people would remember that a long shanked curb is harsher than a snaffle, at the same preassure from the rein.. and that they learnt how different types of bits work..
     
    06-22-2009, 05:51 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zab    
Sunny86:
I don't agree. Maybe because I've grown up around icelandics, which both trots, racks and pace, but all horses can trot. Walk, trot and canter/gallop is the three main gaits and all horses knows them, then some knows another gait, or pace, too.. Many icelandics prefer trot over rack, untill they're trained, and equally many prefer rack and is almost imposdible to trot in the start.. but they learn it. And sure. A horse that has never trotted before is probably unbalanced and has a bad trot.. just as a horse that never has had a rider on his back is unbalanced.. and that's something you train. Trot is a good gait to work a horse in to build good muscles, as well.

With icelandics, and my standardbred, it's like this; if you gait too much the gait gets pacy, if you trot too much it gets more digonal. But if you work in both gaits, both trot and gait improove... I believe it's much the same with all breeds and horses, you can use the gaits to complement each other. As long as you manage to teach the horse to differ from the trot-cue and the gaiting-cue.. >_> Which is where I fail with Crow at the moment..

It's funny what you say, because they say the exact same thing about my standie (we ''only' have gaited icelandics here, and that's the only breed ''allowed'' to gait, everything else must be wrong. They've seen one standie that paced when he got nervous and that means all standies only pace because they're nervous.. it has nothing to do with training.. ;) but reversed: "Any horse that gaits does it because he's tired, tense or not strong enough to trot'' well, unless it's an icelandic then :P

But however if you prefer to use the trot or not s a completely different thing.. I think it's healthy to use the gaits a horse has, but that's just me. And I do see the problem with doing both and trying to get it right.. which is why I'm thinking about quitting the trot, at least or now.. even tho his trot is great.. Anyway..

Trying different bits is always an option, I've used everything to sidepulls or hackamores to snaffles and spanish curbs, and combinations. But I wish people would remember that a long shanked curb is harsher than a snaffle, at the same preassure from the rein.. and that they learnt how different types of bits work..
^^ Maybe I need to make myself more clear. First of all, I have no experience in Iceys, but I have heard that they are multi gaited[trot,tolt,canter,etc].Idk if that is right but that is what I have heard..TWHs, SSHs,etc, don't trot unless they are at liberty. [ie. In pasture with no rider]People have gotten their gaited horses to trot, but it IS NOT a good idea. Horses are creatures of habit--they might get it into a habit. I do not however, agree with changing bits. I only put that on there for ppl that are desperate. A shank creates leverage, raising their heads, making it EASIER for them to gait. Personally, I prefer a snaffle or halter. A trot for a TWH, is not normal--therefore, when they DO do it, it is most likely going to be hard and bumpy and unpracticed. For a gaited horse (maybe not Iceys) a gait is completely NATURAL. That is what most gaited ppl will say, and it is true.
     
    06-22-2009, 06:30 PM
  #17
Zab
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunny06    
^^ Maybe I need to make myself more clear. First of all, I have no experience in Iceys, but I have heard that they are multi gaited[trot,tolt,canter,etc].Idk if that is right but that is what I have heard..TWHs, SSHs,etc, don't trot unless they are at liberty. [ie. In pasture with no rider]People have gotten their gaited horses to trot, but it IS NOT a good idea. Horses are creatures of habit--they might get it into a habit. I do not however, agree with changing bits. I only put that on there for ppl that are desperate. A shank creates leverage, raising their heads, making it EASIER for them to gait. Personally, I prefer a snaffle or halter. A trot for a TWH, is not normal--therefore, when they DO do it, it is most likely going to be hard and bumpy and unpracticed. For a gaited horse (maybe not Iceys) a gait is completely NATURAL. That is what most gaited ppl will say, and it is true.
Yes they are. And the gait is natural to them too, they (many of them) do all of their gaits in liberty, bot trot and rack/tölt, some trot more and other rack more etc tho. :P

It's not a good idea - if you don't want the trot. But the trot itself isn't bad for the horse, just inconvenient for the rider. And there are good things with trot, that complements/helps the gait. And there are ways to teach the horse to gait when it should gait, and trot when it should trot. But I'm starting to doubt if it's worth the hassle :P And if the horse trots at liberty it's certanly a natural gait for them, isn't it? But I also agree with you that they should gait willingly without any sharp methods or bits, since the gait too is natural. And the rider can decide not to trot, I don't think it's a bad idea, but the trot itself isn't bad for the horse, or impossible, or destroys the gait. It just need more work.
Also, all gaits, first time performed under a rider, is unbalanced before it's practiced and trained. The gait might be easier for the horse to first balance in since it's smoother (= no unbalanced rider) and different than the trot, and thus they chose it at first. But it's not more - or less - natural than the trot. Both are natural in a naturally gaited horse.

I don't think the horse should gait with that lifted head, maybe as a help in the start, but the raised neck does mean a lowered back = a weak back and bad collection.. anyway, that's a completely different story, and of course you can't demand a collected, perfect gait immediatly. Just my opinion. :) That would be like asking for a piaff in the first time in saddle :P

I agree with you with the bits, I probably wasn't clear. Personally I think a horse should be able to ride with any bit, r bitless, you choose. But they have different effects and can be more or less helpful.

(Edit: I think all green horses would prefer to gait instead of trot if they just knw how to do it.. trotting a green horse is far from balanced and nice.. x__X Even the non-gaited)
     
    06-22-2009, 09:54 PM
  #18
Green Broke
^^ I agree:)
     
    06-23-2009, 09:46 AM
  #19
Weanling
Well said everyone. Hope the inexperienced Gaited owners are learning something, I know I am and I have years of experience with them.
     
    06-23-2009, 11:35 AM
  #20
Showing
Gaited horses do a sort of trot, I agree its not normally a true trot. I think its called a "slick trot" similar to a fox trot.
-Definition from http://www.foxtrotters.org/art_understanding_gaits.htm- "Slick Trot: A manner of moving that is identical to a foxtrot (walking in front and trotting in the rear) but the horse is taking small steps, rather than extending its stride"
Vida will do a running walk that is kind of rough. I don't encourage it and she will usually only do it when she is in a hurry to get home. She will only do it for a few paces before I get her collected back up. Running walk definition also from the Foxtrotter page-
"Running Walk: A gait in which the horse is walking with its rear legs and trotting with its front legs. (This can be done in a diagonal or lateral or broken pattern, although a balanced broken pattern is most correct. *see tips below.)"

On collection, I want to say I do occasionally ride her bitless. I don't believe you have to stick a torture device in the mouth to get the proper gait. I collect her with my seat, legs, slight hand cues and by saying "easy" Not by getting in her face and mouth with a harsh bit.
I don't believe any unnatural devices should be needed to get a gait out of a true naturally gaited horse. My babies both popped out of their moms gaiting.
They will also do the ones listed above, a regular slow walk, the canter and gallop. I see many gaited horses on trails with riders who can't get they're horses out of gait to do a normal walk. They have been made to gait so much they can't do anything else under saddle. Makes it hard or impossible to ride with someone on a non-gaited horse. I think this is sad.
     

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