Trotting TWHs?
   

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Trotting TWHs?

This is a discussion on Trotting TWHs? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • How to teach a twh to trot
  • Bouncy tennessee walker

 
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    10-27-2009, 11:08 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Trotting TWHs?

I am thinking about getting a TWH, which has always been my dream horse, but I would still like to be able to show in "normal" dressage shows. I can't afford more than one horse at a time, so I am wondering if there is a way to 'teach' a TWH how to trot, can some trot, some can't?

Just looking for some info as I continue my search. I know that some of you don't like the idea of trotting gaited horses, but please don't flame this thread.
     
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    10-27-2009, 08:17 PM
  #2
Showing
I'm not sure if a gaited horse is a breed you will want to do dressage on. I've not ever heard of them doing competing in it.
Maybe get a trotting horse and teach it to gait would be an easier task
     
    10-27-2009, 08:22 PM
  #3
Weanling
Some Tennessee Walking Horses do trot. My Walker trots but it's practically UNSITABLE. Very, very, very, VERY BOUNCY. Tennessee Walking horses would not be the best dressage mounts. If dressage is your absolute passion and you wanna go pretty far in it, then I would not recommend a Walker. I don't see why you can't show in normal dressage with a Walker, but I think that I'd require a lot of training.
     
    10-27-2009, 09:02 PM
  #4
Green Broke
There are gaited horse dressage shows. There are non-gaited horse shows which is what sounds like you want to attend. You will not be allowed to attend those on a gaited horse I believe. But I could be wrong.

If you want to do dressage, just go with a regular trotting horse. I don't see why someone would purposely buy a gaited horse and teach it to trot.

So yes, I wouldn't reccommend it. However, to answer your question, yes they can be so-called 'trained' to trot.
     
    10-27-2009, 09:05 PM
  #5
Green Broke
I have a friend who has TWH, and it seems to be a general concensus that if you don't "nurture" the running walk, they actually do lose it. Jessi was never trained to do a running walk, so she did normal gaits her entire life. If Sonja tried asking for a running walk, she'd start pacing.

She finally sat down and dedicated herself to teaching her and now she'll do it. But it was the same with the fillies, they had to "teach" them to do it on command. However, the one filly flat out does not trot. Before she did her running walk with a rider, she'd pace everywhere she went.

But I agree with SpiritRiverJordan, unless you already HAVE a TWH and you're interested in Dressage, don't buy a horse unsuitable for the disciplines you enjoy. TWH have a very different conformation then "regular" horses which is why they gait. You may get lucky and find one that trots with ease, but it's a real gamble.
     
    10-27-2009, 09:10 PM
  #6
Weanling
Some TWHs are naturally gaited, those are normally the best rides. If you teach you TWH to trot it is VERY hard to get them to gait again. I went to a camp with one that trotted, and I was able to get her to do a running walk, but she was still slightly pacey. There are gaited horse dressage events, but if you're not interested in those then I would agree that you should probably go for a trotting horse. It makes no sense to have a trotting gaited horse because that is all they will want to do.
     
    10-27-2009, 09:11 PM
  #7
Yearling
I remember reading on this thread, that gaited horses and not popular in the Dressage Ring.
If you are really set on doing dressage, I would definitally suggest another horse.
     
    10-28-2009, 07:28 PM
  #8
Weanling
Let me put it this way, you can show gaiteds in dressage, however you will NEVER win. Maybe with a saddlebred, but never with a walker. You will have lost before you even entered the ring. Best to stick to the breed that will give you a chance at a win.
     
    10-28-2009, 07:46 PM
  #9
Trained
Well, I don't know much about dressage, so I'll defer to everyone elses' opinions there. In my experience with TWH they will and can gait/trot. Of the three I had growing up: One would gait almost exclusively, rarely trotted; another gaited and trotted depending on what you asked for, he also had a gorgeous canter and a very fast gallop; the last preferred to trot, but never had trouble gaiting and would do it without a problem when you asked, she was very lazy though so I think that's why she preferred to trot unless asked for the running walk. The last mare is 29 years old and still gaits and trots in the pasture.

These horses were all siblings though and I think that some of the natural "gaitiness" is being bred out of Walkers. In reality if you're looking to do dressage competetively you should get a breed that is designed to do it. Or at the very least doesn't have an automatic disadvantage due to it's structure. Unless you're just looking to do dressage for fun. Then go for it.
     
    10-29-2009, 01:12 PM
  #10
Started
I have two Walkers and neither of them are gaited. They both trot naturally and both of them are smooth trotters.

My family aso owns two Racking Horses and one Racker/x/Quarterhorse filly... both the full Rackers are gaited, but one also knows how to trot (very, very bumpy)... the only doesn't know how to trot, even free in the pasture she racks or paces... and the cross filly only trots.
     

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