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TWH short steps

This is a discussion on TWH short steps within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category

     
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        12-16-2010, 08:14 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Ok then, it looks like saving up for x-rays then follow-up with the chiro if there's nothing in the x-rays

    I know folks say some TWH's will never gait, but I have a hard time getting my head wrapped around that concept provided there's no doubt they are 100% Tennessee Walkers.

    I have owned four in my life and currently have three. The only time they won't gait at liberty is if the two that do the running walk are behind my Arab and mimicing his trot, or they are hurt in some way and it's more comfortable to be trotting.

    My step-pacer has hock and ankle arthritis and has never trotted a day in his life. He will hard lateral pace at liberty, and if he hurts too much he'll just slow down.

    I could say poor training before you bought him might be a contributing factor when being worked, but poor training doesn't affect them when they are in the pasture being themselves.

    So I'm back to my first thought that, for whatever reason, he hurts

    I hope you can get this resolved soon and please update because I am really curious
         
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        12-17-2010, 06:55 AM
      #12
    Foal
    He's not registered and I know very little about his history, but other people more knowledgable than I take one look at him and tell me he's built like the old-time walkers, especially his head, which is on the big side with really long ears. In fact, my nickname for him is Jughead. And he can gait, I didn't mean to say in my last post that he can't, he can. He just can't do it very well or for any length of time at all. The trait is definitely there. It's just a matter of figuring out why he's so resistant to developing it. He's only 7 so I think we still have time.

    Thanks for your help and I will keep you updated.
         
        12-25-2010, 08:54 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Have you tried using ground poles? Placing them a short distance at first then increasing the distance to make him give a longer stride?
         
        12-26-2010, 02:35 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RunnWalk    
    Have you tried using ground poles? Placing them a short distance at first then increasing the distance to make him give a longer stride?
    No, not yet. I saw that in Lee Ziegler's book and we did actually buy some poles - actually, fence posts - right before the weather turned mostly bad a couple weeks ago. It is on our list of things to try and will be added to the other stuff we do in the round pen.
         
        12-26-2010, 08:16 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Definately sounds like your TWH could use some chiro, massage, and/or accupuncture work, as walkinthewalk mentions.
         
        12-27-2010, 11:05 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Suzanne Turner    
    Definately sounds like your TWH could use some chiro, massage, and/or accupuncture work, as walkinthewalk mentions.
    We're planning x-rays and a chiro visit, just trying to budget for it right now.

    I hope something works, it'll probably be a combination of vet/chiro treatment and further training. He's such a fantastic horse in every respect but this one. He's strong and healthy, easy keeper, great work ethic, not spooky at all, and very mannerly although a bit high-spirited, probably just due to being young. Even if he never gaits well, I see him being a "forever" horse.
         
        12-28-2010, 11:55 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Walkerlady, my Trimmer was here this morning and when there's four horses to trim, the conversations run the gamut

    One of which was the stallion his MIL bought not too long ago that was short striding really bad and nothing he did in the way of hoof maintenance helped, so the MIL finally cowed down and got the chiropractor out.

    The horse was out in both hips. They turned the horse out too soon, however, and he got to playing hard enough that he put himself out again and they had to have the chiro come back out.

    I already knew the answer but asked my Trimmer how much difference the hip adjustments made in the stallion's at-liberty gait, so I could tell you

    He said the adjustments made a "-----tremendous amount of difference and the stride was much more fluid and flowing----".

    Just thought you'd like to have a baseline from another horse's short-striding issues

    Also, I can't remember if it was this forum or somewhere else where the question was asked how long trimmers should take with each horse.

    My Trimmer has been doing my horses since Fall, 2007 so has the drill down pretty good. He was here 2 hours - 30 minutes per horse. Depending on the time of year, he comes every 5 -6 weeks.

    That being said, I used to do all the trimming but my back won't allow it, but I do keep up with all of the frog maintenance and will maintenance the soles if they look like they want to shed in between his visits.

    So he essentially spends 30 minutes per horse doing nothing but trimming hoof and balancing them 98% of the time because I can't keep my nose out of their hooves and do the rest ---- just to give a baseline on that:)
         
        12-28-2010, 12:10 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Well...a competant trimmer/farrier should be able to properly do a horse in 10-15 min. If this guy is running 30 min. Then that raises some "red flags" with me. Either he's really not sure what he's doing or he's doing a bunch of "showmanship." We had one guy locally who dressed like Crockodle Dundee, took forever to trim a foot (with lots of motion and not much progress), and regularly sored up stock because he was a True Believer in short toes and trimmed excessivly (making the horse sore for a few days afterwards). He used to do a couple of Walkers at our place. When questioned about his work, and the fact that horses walked away from his stand more sore than when they got there, his answer was, "They just need to toughen up."

    Needless to say I never let this guy touch one of my horses.

    Maybe it's time for a second opinon on the trims you're getting.

    G.
         
        12-28-2010, 02:54 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Guilherme    
    Well...a competant trimmer/farrier should be able to properly do a horse in 10-15 min. If this guy is running 30 min. Then that raises some "red flags" with me. Either he's really not sure what he's doing or he's doing a bunch of "showmanship." We had one guy locally who dressed like Crockodle Dundee, took forever to trim a foot (with lots of motion and not much progress), and regularly sored up stock because he was a True Believer in short toes and trimmed excessivly (making the horse sore for a few days afterwards). He used to do a couple of Walkers at our place. When questioned about his work, and the fact that horses walked away from his stand more sore than when they got there, his answer was, "They just need to toughen up."

    Needless to say I never let this guy touch one of my horses.

    Maybe it's time for a second opinon on the trims you're getting.

    G.
    Generally I agree with you but sorry not this time. There is no showmanship or boogie boogie wizardry involved.

    What there IS are four horses, each with their own issues.

    1. The 23 yr old is insulin resistant, has hock and ankle arthritis and needs breaks; or isn't that allowed in your world.
    2. The 24+ was a starving horse poster child with an injured vertebra when I rescued him 17+ years ago. As he gets older and the arthritis in his back gets worse, he needs breaks too.
    3. The 15 yr old has a mild club hoof.
    4. The 12 yr old is also insulin resistant, is slightly cowhocked and has some funky hoof issues that the vet and the chiro both have been involved in. His hooves are rock solid and he has exceptionally thick wall, they just require an almost prescription trim and that takes time.

    If you know anything about hooves, all of that should clearly state that each of these horses needs extra time. Every time he trims, he looks at how each horse is moving before he starts trimming.

    My Trimmer has never sored my horses; matter-of-fact my 23 yo IR horse can now be ridden barefoot on the road for the short distances we go; something he could never have done in the past.

    Contrary to your thoughts, if someone did a wham bam thankyou ma'am trim and had four hooves done in 15 minutes on one of my horses, they would be the one to be fired. For my part, 30 minutes per horse is an appropriate amount of time to do the job properly without any showmanship involved.

    I have never trimmed profressionally but I have trimmed my own horses, as needed, during my youth and adult life to know that 15 minutes is NOT enough time to do justice to four hooves.

    Nuff said on this thread. Feel free to PM me or start another thread.
         
        01-07-2011, 10:01 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    I didn't go through and read the entire post, but it sounds like he need to build up his muscles in his back end. He may never have a huge over-stride, but dragging tires or working going up hills with him will help to delvelop the muscles in the back end which will help him get under himself.

    I am training a TWH right now and at a barn with about 6 show horses in the breed and they often use hills or dragging tires to develope those muscles.
         

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