Venting about "smarter" gaited horse owners - Page 2
   

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Venting about "smarter" gaited horse owners

This is a discussion on Venting about "smarter" gaited horse owners within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • When put chains on d back of a gaited horse do they need to b loose

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    09-13-2013, 11:01 PM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
I think you're right about the insecurity. The other lady I'm friendly with there says she does that to everyone, and when she said something to her daughter, she told her to knock it off.

I guess people still surprise me. If I only owned my first gaited horse a year, and met someone who ridden gaited horses for a few years, I'd be looking to learn something!

I've never met gaited horse owners that did not obsess over their saddle fitting. I tried 8 saddles before this one, and this one fit. No doubt about it. Maybe gaited horses are harder to fit. Who knows?
Gaited horses can be a "tough fit," from what I've seen. And there are a lot of gaited horse riders out there who either obsess over the fit and spend way more money on saddles than necessary (because it's a "gaited horse saddle" made by a "gaited horse trainer") and they have the same issues anyway.

You just have to find the saddle that fits your horse, keeping in mind that horses like Tennessee Walkers tend to have very "mobile" shoulders compared to more short-strided breeds.
     
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    09-30-2013, 12:12 AM
  #12
Foal
If it makes you feel better, I have the same issues at my barn. The only way I have dealt with her is humor.

A woman is constantly harping on me about my underweight, limping, head-too-high, pushing too much off the back quarter horse. Excuse me? He's a walker.

One day I had to move down to the box stalls because my horse managed to bang his eye some how which caused the pupil to constrict and he temporarily lost vision. I was given medication which dilated his pupil to keep him from freaking out, but he needed constant shade to prevent sun damage to the eye.

I am giving him medication, and she just barged into 'my' stall and asks if he's contagious. I said no, and that he will only be there a few days. She asks if the medication is for his weight. I wanted to say, "Yes.. I am putting medication in his eye to help with his weight, ma'am." but I just said no, that he hit it and it was now dilated. She grabbed a flashlight and put it to his eye and I asked her not to do that and that a vet had already seen it.

She then just starts pulling on my horses withers, shaking him around. He keeps walking away, and she tells me if I got a chiropractor out for him his withers would grow and he wouldn't be so down hill. Since I met my horse as a yearling, he was downhill and has had NO withers. They aren't going to sprout from a massage, lady.

She then starts pushing his hip. As trained, he steps away each time. She tells me he is sore in the hip and that is why he limps when I trot him. I was ignoring her at this point, saying I needed to leave.

She then starts SPOUTING about how she was a big shot trainer in Oregon. (Mean while, she has 2 six year old warmbloods she can't start to save her life.) She then tells me my horse is about 400 pounds under weight, and would be pulled from any show I put him in. I was just cleaning brushes at this point, ignoring her. She walks back up to me and tells me I should look up a diet for a Quarter Horse under light work. I look at her.. slightly dumbfounded. I informed her he was a Tennessee Walking horse, and she asks for proof! I kind of laughed and said I don't actually carry his papers on me at the barn, but that when I bought him he has Tennessee Walking Horse papers. She said "Oh, if that's what they told you. Those can be faked."

At this point I just left, and asked the barn manager to please get her out of my stall. She was still shaking my poor horse. After she was... evacuated, I told the barn manager what happened. It's now the running joke at the barn that my Quarter Horse is limping every time I gait him.

People will always try to act like they know more than they know. Most of the people with any knowledge value it enough to keep their mouths closed until someone is seeking it. Best of luck dealing with your person. Mine still hollers at me in the arena that my horse is underweight, limping, and unfit to ride every time I pass her stall.
     
    09-30-2013, 12:25 AM
  #13
Yearling
Oh, Gawd, Olive, that's quite a funny story. Yes, I've been told my horse is lame, I've been told she's not a pure walker because they don't come in a roan color (she has papers), I'm holding the reins too tight, (no, my curb chain is loose and horse has a happy face).

Someone needs to put your lady out of her misery. I haven't seen mine lately. I've also been having this teen ride my horse so I can watch. It'll be funny when she sees this teen on my horse (riding better).

Thanks for sharing that story.
Anyone else have a funny one?
oliveoats, Glenknock and jklitzke like this.
     
    10-08-2013, 04:10 PM
  #14
Weanling
Oh gosh Olive that is such a funny story I am still giggling. I love the line about putting eye drops in his eye to gain weight.
Glenknock and jklitzke like this.
     
    10-11-2013, 08:42 PM
  #15
Foal
Howdy All, I try very hard not to be the "know it all" at the barn. More often then not if they knew as much about anything as they do about everything they would be a darn smart person. I do have one rule about speaking up, if I see somebody about the get their brains kicked out I do try to mention that to them.LOL
     
    10-11-2013, 09:29 PM
  #16
Super Moderator
Yep. That's the place where you have to draw the line on being a MYOB type.
     
    10-11-2013, 09:50 PM
  #17
Yearling
I don't give any advice unless specifically asked for it, and I do leave myself plenty of wiggle room; words like most, likely, unlikely , possible, more common, etc.
     
    10-13-2013, 04:54 PM
  #18
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches    
Well since I had just met her, I really did mean it as a compliment. I didn't know her much at the time. I see now that she's inexperienced. She said my seat is wrong because I am not sitting in a chair seat. I see that she thinks it's all about how high the horse lifts it's front legs, not the reach of the back legs. Since I've had a dressage background, I found her saddle put my seat too far back. My saddle keeps my legs heel in line with my shoulder and hip. I am not a perfect rider but I know what my faults are.

I would never open my mouth and correct anyone. She needs to stop criticizing me for things she has no experience with. Now that I've vented , I'm ready to let it roll off my back. If she continues, I will just have to say that we must have different schools of thought, and my horse gaits just fine. I'm going away for 2 weeks, but I'll get that video and post it.

Under the saddle thread here, it seems most people ride in saddles that are not made for gaited horses but rather ride in what fits. I've always learned that the saddle needs to fit her and me, no matter what the type of saddle. I've been thru 8 saddles finding the right fit. The gaited ones were either perched and rocked, or too big for her. The Tucker fit her like a glove until she muscled up and tipped it back. Or they fit her but made me sit too far back on her spine. The only other one that fits her is an Abetta regular tree. Also fit like a glove and I still have it. I will get a video and you all can critique my riding. I have faults, but I feel I know what they are , and strive to correct them.

Jolly, you are absolutely right to MYOB
Most gaited trainers ride in a chair seat. Rarely will you find one that does classical riding. So she is just learning what she is taught from the professionals so I can understand her reasoning.
     
    10-13-2013, 05:45 PM
  #19
Green Broke
I don't get the whole "the head bobs so they must be lame" thing. To me a limping horse and a gaited horse look totally different. And if my Fox Trotter is "off" I can tell that as easily as I can with my non-gaited horses. Maybe I have finally been around horses enough to recognize lameness. I know when I was a beginner I had trouble with it. But all people must be looking for is a head bob to declare a horse lame.
     
    10-13-2013, 06:11 PM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
Most gaited trainers ride in a chair seat. Rarely will you find one that does classical riding. So she is just learning what she is taught from the professionals so I can understand her reasoning.
If that would have been it alone, fine. Yes, her trainer taught her that way, the trainer's husband should have-he has more experience with gaited. The expert lady, LOL, also said that at the schooling show at another barn, the ones that sat in a chair seat won, I said they didn't because I just moved from that barn and the gaited trainer Never taught a chair seat. No one at that barn rode in a chair seat.

Back to the expert lady who'd had her gaited horse one year, and had chatted with me for an hour prior to giving me her expert advice. And should have considered that I've owned my horse for 8 years. That's the part I find funny.

From her reasoning that she was taught that way, I didn't argue the training issue cause sometimes you just know when you are not going to be heard! LOL
     

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