What does this mean? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

What does this mean?

This is a discussion on What does this mean? within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • What does pacing mean horse
  • What does it mean when a horse can step

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-10-2011, 01:34 AM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by rum4    
Pacing and racking is not the same. My TWH does a Rack and it is smooth
Okay that literally makes no sense... they are descriptively the same thing. Just because your horse's rack is smooth doesn't mean anything... just like some horses have rough trots, and some horses have smooth trots
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-10-2011, 01:42 AM
  #12
Banned
Nope, a rack and a pace are two totally different gaits.
This is a rack

OP: If you are just looking for something to cruise the trailers on, I would give this horse a look. Pacing isn't all bad, its just not a 'desirable' gait.
     
    01-10-2011, 10:23 AM
  #13
Yearling
One of the problems in a lot of gaited breeds/types is "loose language."

A "pace" is a two beat, lateral gait.

A "rack" is an asynchronous, lateral, four beat gait."

A “running walk” is a synchronous, four beat gait.

But a lot of authors are inconsistent with hese terms. You'll hear the term "pacy" being applied to laterally gaited horses. Sometimes a “loose lip” will call the “rack” a “pace.” It’s technically wrong, but in the context of any given discussion where everyone is “on the same page” nobody says anything. When that discussion is moved out of context or the readers are not all of the same background it gets confusing.

If you draw the continuum of gaits, with the pace on the left and the trot on the right, you put the running walk in the center. A rack will lie between the running walk and the pace. Just where it will lie depends on the timing of the footfalls.

G.
     
    01-10-2011, 12:47 PM
  #14
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snookeys    
Okay that literally makes no sense... they are descriptively the same thing. Just because your horse's rack is smooth doesn't mean anything... just like some horses have rough trots, and some horses have smooth trots

I have to disagree with it and have to say that what you stated makes no sense. In a gaited horse a rack is smooth the pace is never smooth! I have several gaited horses and the rack in the ones that do it is smooth but as soon as they step out of the rack and into a pace it is the worst ride I have ever had.
     
    01-10-2011, 01:23 PM
  #15
Weanling
I am training a walking horse right now and here is what I have learned about the breed and their gaits.

The desired gait is a 4-beat with a headshake. Although most walking horses are naturally able to gait this way, not all of them use their 4-beat gait 100% of the time. It isn't an easy gait for them, so in the pasture they slip out and pacem or trot. Pacing is 2 beat, very rough and not very comfortable to ride. It is when the front and back legs of the horse on each side work in unison.

When they say your horse tends to pace she slips out of gait, her ride becomes rough. If she were racking, she would still be in a 4-beat motion but with no headshake, in the rack it is still smooth but they are able to skip the headahake and have more speed. There are actually shows specifiocally for racking horses as it is to some people a desirable gait.

So when they say she will pace on you if you go too fast, she doesn not have the muscle build up to go in a fast speed at a 4-beat walk with a head shake (she is not racking) the fact that she paces if you let her go too fast isn't a bad thing...you could fix it by doing a lot of trail rides and arena work and slowly working your way up to a higher speed as her muscles develop.

My girl does the same thing, she is 3 (and I am traiing her for show so working on these things soecifically right now) and when she gets going too fast for her muscles she switches gait to something she can keep her balance at in the speed she is going. She step-paces, keeps her balance and maintains speed rather than form.

So it is a fixable thing, I would go out ride her, see how she feels, some horses (like mine) do a step-pace which is a very smooth pace, and if it is to be a trail horse, a step pace is workable in the trails as well as you aren't bouncing around.
     
    01-10-2011, 03:49 PM
  #16
Foal
I take it to mean the horse will stop being as smooth once you get to a certain speed.

How un-smooth will vary quite a bit from horse to horse. One of my TWH does a pace that is not as smooth as her running walk but is still very easy to ride. My other TWH does a god-awful hard pace that is almost impossible to ride.

The only way to know is to test-ride the horse at different speeds. Make sure you set the speed, don't let the horse just follow another horse who's setting the speed. That's a mistake I made once when I bought one of my Walkers.
     
    01-10-2011, 07:25 PM
  #17
Weanling
I find when most horses begin to pace they actually move your legs back and forth like you are walking and it is very uncomfortable and twists your back as bad as a trot when you're not posting to it.

Racking must be smooth. The video above does not really show a true rack... you can see that the best in the true racking horse when they have their speed going. All the racking horses I have seen maintain the smooth regardless of speed.
     
    01-10-2011, 07:34 PM
  #18
Yearling
My TWH mare will pace when she's pushed too fast in the running walk. It's actually pretty smooth but because it's a hollower back I don't let her do it. The pace will shake the rider from side to side, where the four beat gaits shake more from the back to the front. That's one way to tell, when you're riding on trial. I would suggest getting someone to video what she does, because those legs move so fast it's hard to figure out, and they can switch between running walk/stepping pace/pace and back again so fast that you might have trouble figuring it out.

That's exactly what my TWH's former owner said - and it means that if you push her too fast, she will go into a pace. As another poster said, there is always another gait beyond the running walk if they are pushed too far, and if it's not a rocking chair canter or a rack, you should count on it that it probably isn't a gait you want to ride!

I think the trick is to see how far, and how fast, the horse will gait properly before it paces. If it's going to pace when you ask for a little speed, versus a lot of speed, you will have to decide whether you want to train for more speed at an easy gait, or whether you want to keep looking. It isn't an overnight training fix; it's really more like building up an athlete's conditioning and not letting them get lazy again.
     
    01-10-2011, 09:55 PM
  #19
Weanling
Exactly ladytrails, as my girl is 3 and hasnt the muscle and power yet I go as fast as she can go while still in gait, as soon as she goes out of it, I half halt her and get her back into the gait. The trick is in correcting it right away and training at that speed to build up the muscles wherever you're riding. It is no over night fix, but is repairable if you're looking for speed and gait it just takes a lot longer to get there when it is not the easiest gait for the horse.
     
    01-13-2011, 12:03 AM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kstinson    
I go as fast as she can go while still in gait, as soon as she goes out of it, I half halt her and get her back into the gait. The trick is in correcting it right away and training at that speed to build up the muscles wherever you're riding. It is no over night fix, but is repairable if you're looking for speed and gait it just takes a lot longer to get there when it is not the easiest gait for the horse.
That sounds like what I'm doing - although I'm not a trainer and appreciate hearing from a trainer it's the right approach! I use a little more contact for a few strides and that usually brings her back into gait; if not the half halt is the next thing.
     

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0