Working on a flat walk - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics > Horse Breeds > Gaited Horses

Working on a flat walk

This is a discussion on Working on a flat walk within the Gaited Horses forums, part of the Horse Breeds category
  • Flat walk of the foxtrotter
  • Gaited horses problems with lateral work

Like Tree61Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    12-02-2012, 10:42 AM
  #21
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbsmfg3    
sorry there is one exception : The only diagonal gait of the gaited horses is the Fox trot. All other gaited horses are lateral. And yes a foxtrotter could have a lower head set, because it is half way trotting.

If you have had good luck with a regular snaffle, that's fine, your one of the very few. OR, you did a whole lot of inappropriate training. In either case, there are a few it will work with. In general, that is not the case. Most of them, snaffle or otherwise, need a "comfort" bit, to prevent pinching and unnecessary discomfort. If you have not checked your horse's mouth for fit, how do you know whether it fits or not? I've seen a whole bunch of trainers that simply use the same bit on all of them, regardless of the fit. Just because you have always used a regular snaffle on a horse, does NOT mean it is a good fit. Most horses are very adaptive and will learn to accept a lot of poor fits. BUT, just imagine how much more you could get them to do freely, if you avoid uncomfy bits, etc.

In any case, the point I was trying to make about the snaffle, is simply, you can not assume a snaffle is easy on the horse without first checking. A snaffle can be just as severe as anyother bit, if it does not fit. I think the point went over the top.
You are wrong on the first point. The marcha batida is a diagonal gait. The true running walk is a centered gait (neither diagonal or lateral). The vast majority of North American gaited horses are lateral, but that does not make but that does not make your assertion a general rule.

Indeed you can injure a horse quite badly with an ill-choosen or ill-used snaffle bit. But the problem is not the "snaffle" action (which is direct) but in selection of the mouthpiece. On my bit wall I've got 9 different snaffle bits and seven different types of mouthpieces are represented. What I choose with any one horse will depend on what I want to do with them. Or if I'm working on correcting a problem what that problem might be.

You are correct that many people make false assumptions about snaffle bits. One of the most common is that "a fat bit is less severe than thin one." This true if both bits fit correctly. But I was at a trail ride and saw a horse being ridden with a hugely fat snaffle; it made the horse look like it had a mouth full of bubble gum. The horse was quite uncomfortable, on the edge of being fractious. The owner was clueless. Ron White's famous observation was again verified.

Amongst the folks I work with the snaffle is by far the most common bit used. When I visited Brazil it was the most common bit used (there are 350,000 Marchadors in Brazil). I don't find my experiences at all unique.

G.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    12-02-2012, 01:49 PM
  #22
Foal
In my original post I did not profess that a snaffle is a better bit that any other. I merely stated I was trying MY horse in a snaffle. I agree bit choice should be made based on what and where you want to go with your horse and of course any bit must fit the horse you are using it on.

But the more universal observations is that most gaited horse owner think a gaited horse has to be ridden in a shank bit. (And so we don't start another debate I am not saying that shank bits are bad !!!)

I have a rather young horse (turning 6) and I am pretty sure he was started in a shank bit. I am working on bending and lateral work and in my opinion you need a broken bit to do this, hence the snaffle ...

I
Brighteyes likes this.
     
    12-02-2012, 01:58 PM
  #23
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pattilou    
But the more universal observations is that most gaited horse owner think a gaited horse has to be ridden in a shank bit. (And so we don't start another debate I am not saying that shank bits are bad !!!)

I have a rather young horse (turning 6) and I am pretty sure he was started in a shank bit. I am working on bending and lateral work and in my opinion you need a broken bit to do this, hence the snaffle ...

I
Just my experience but most people I've met use a shank bit on their horse wether gaited or non gaited with the only real debate on how long that shank should be. Again, just my experience, but the ones I know who always use a snaffle rarely, if ever, leave an arena. The only caveat is most are initially trained in a snaffle then transitioned to a shanked bit.
     
    12-02-2012, 06:15 PM
  #24
Weanling
Quote: "I am working on bending and lateral work and in my opinion you need a broken bit to do this"


Why?

I'd assume you will also want to ride the horse, and will want the bending an lateral work to apply from the saddle. So Why, would you not use the same bit for both ground work and from the saddle? Why get the horse accustomed to two different bits for the same purpose? A shanked bit, properly used and fit, will also work for ground work.

After finding the Mylar comfort bits, we start and ride a horse with the same bit. May not be the same for all horses, but is the same from start to finish on a particular horse. Why, confuse the poor rascals anymore than we already do.
     
    12-02-2012, 10:52 PM
  #25
Yearling
I don't want my horse's neck inverted and high, and don't want her nose on the ground. I want her to find the bit, relaxed, and do that famous head nod at a flat walk. If she's not nodding, something is not right....somewhere.
     
    12-02-2012, 11:11 PM
  #26
Foal
I liked your quote princessfluffybritches, but I like your name even more :)
     
    12-03-2012, 11:48 PM
  #27
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by old97fan    
I liked your quote princessfluffybritches, but I like your name even more :)
Awww, thankyou! It's the name of one of my Polish chickens.
Pattilou likes this.
     
    12-04-2012, 12:06 AM
  #28
Yearling


Princessfluffybritches
Malda, HorseCrazyTeen and twp like this.
     
    12-04-2012, 12:18 AM
  #29
Foal
I see where the name comes from :)
     
    12-04-2012, 12:49 AM
  #30
twp
Banned
My walker does a flat walk just fine, and keeps her head low.. Compated to other gaited horses.. I even taught her to neck rein.. But, When I want her to do a fast walk, she lifts her head perfectly, and I ride her on a loose rein. Most walker people just don't ride like that, because "That's not the way walkers were intended to be ridden" But I don't see the harm in it. I ride in a halter for the most part, and I spent allot of time on flexing her head, and such like that. When she starts to walk fast, I just bump her down, and keep her in a flat walk, and eventually she learned, she don't have to walk as fast as she can everywhere. I also noticed she is allot more calm than she used to be. She would walk right beside of our appy mare, no problem. :)
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
flat walk vs running walk QHDragon Gaited Horses 13 09-26-2011 03:05 PM
Working the Flat Walk trailhorserider Gaited Horses 9 09-19-2011 11:50 AM
Western-Walk,Jog,Lope,gallop-English- Walk, Trot, Canter, Gallop...RIGHT?! thunderhooves Horse Riding 10 05-07-2010 06:26 AM
My dog working on her Spanish Walk! (kind of) roro General Off Topic Discussion 4 09-30-2009 05:34 PM
Walk/Trot flat work ideas. HorsesAreForever Horse Training 7 05-18-2009 04:26 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0