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**Calling all dog experts!**

This is a discussion on **Calling all dog experts!** within the General Off Topic Discussion forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category

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        01-18-2012, 06:39 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rachel1786    
    The 2 vets I worked for(2 different hospitals) both did a hernia repair no cost with a spay/neuter. I would say if you like the dog it is well worth it. You can also call the place you plan on taking her to and ask how much extra a hernia repair is. Usually they are pretty cheap because they are easy to fix.
    I plan on doing that tomorrow morning, because they are closed right now. I've talked to a previous employee/family friend and he said that they used to do them for free but he doesn't know anymore (he worked there three years ago). Hopefully they haven't changed the pricing! Lol.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sharpie    
    Your best bet is just to call the vet and ask for an estimate, that way you have solid information to go with. Prices vary hugely- from an extra $20 to double the cost of the spay. Best to know for sure rather than guessing!

    I would do it myself if I liked the dog since it's a one time thing, and nothing on the lifetime expense of any animal. Better to pay a little more up front to get the critter who is going to fit well in my life than cheap out on the start and wind up with an animal who will never be quite what I wanted/needed.
    Read above. (:

    I think I'm going to get her depending on what I find out tomorrow. Exactly, and I've been looking for a while with no luck.
         
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        01-18-2012, 06:56 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Umbilical hernias are typically a genetic defect in dogs and suggests questionable/poor breeding. You may want to think things over and try and figure out if there may be other genetic conditions this dog may be vulnerable to and decide if it's worth it. Like hip displasia in some breeds or skin conditions in others. If you decide to go ahead and get the dog. A spay would be appropriate so the bad genes aren't passed farther along. I would also let the breeder know so they don't make the cross again, if you're buying from a breeder. I would probably pass on a dog with this problem. The breeders being able to sell dogs like this just perpetuates the problem. I'd let them know why I was passing, though.
    Sharpie and DraftyAiresMum like this.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:00 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Just curious, what kind of dog is it? Just so you'd know what kind of issues to look for down the road.
    myhorsesonador likes this.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:12 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bearkiller    
    Umbilical hernias are typically a genetic defect in dogs and suggests questionable/poor breeding. You may want to think things over and try and figure out if there may be other genetic conditions this dog may be vulnerable to and decide if it's worth it. Like hip displasia in some breeds or skin conditions in others. If you decide to go ahead and get the dog. A spay would be appropriate so the bad genes aren't passed farther along. I would also let the breeder know so they don't make the cross again, if you're buying from a breeder. I would probably pass on a dog with this problem. The breeders being able to sell dogs like this just perpetuates the problem. I'd let them know why I was passing, though.

    This is only partly true. SOME umbilical hernias are hereditary but not all. A puppy can get an umbilical hernia if the mother is too rough biting the umbilical cord when they are born. ALSO, not every hernia needs to be fixed. Many, many go away on their own. If it is a small hernia and it is soft, you can just push it back in every time you pick up the puppy and it will close on it's own by the time the pup is 6 months old. However, if it is large (bigger than a grape) or hard, then you do need to have it closed.

    When I first started breeding my mastiffs I would let the mother cut the cords herself and I would always have a pup or two out of the litter with umbilical hernias. Now, I cut them myself and tie them off with dental floss. This has prevented umbilical hernias since I started doing this. So an umbilical hernia is definetly NOT a sign of a bad breeder.

    It would help to know what breed the puppy is, how big is he, and how big is the hernia. Is it soft or hard? Can you push it back up into his belly? Most likely, if you can push it back up in there and the hole you feel is smaller than your fingertip, it will close on it's own.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:16 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
    Just curious, what kind of dog is it? Just so you'd know what kind of issues to look for down the road.
    Wanted to clarify this...

    When I got my dog (an aussie/st bernard mix), I knew going into it what health issues both breeds were prone to and how to make them liveable. Example: both aussies and saints are known to have hip problems. My boy already has mild hip problems (not quite dysplasia, according to the vet, but it could eventually become dysplasia) and has had them since he was a year old (he'll be five this year). I put him on glucosamine/chondroiton supplements and he is perfectly fine, except when getting up from the floor (which is cement in our place, and cold) when the weather is cold. Because of this, he always has a soft bed available to lay on.

    If you don't know what kind of issues the breed(s) is/are prone to, it can cause a lot of headache (and heartache) later down the road.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:18 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bearkiller    
    A spay would be appropriate so the bad genes aren't passed farther along.
    If you hadn't read I was planning on having the surgery done the same time I was going to have her spayed.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
    Just curious, what kind of dog is it? Just so you'd know what kind of issues to look for down the road.
    She's a Pit Bull. I've found a different puppy that I'm going to look at this weekend, that isn't exactly what I wanted but she's got nothing wrong with her and not much over my price range.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:23 PM
      #17
    Foal
    SRCM16, don't discount the first puppy just because of a hernia. That is absolutely not as big of a deal as some of the people on here are making it out to be. Go see the puppy first and look at the hernia first hand. If it's large or hard, then you might want to pass on the pup. BUT if it's small and soft, I wouldn't hesitate to purchase the puppy. I've been breeding dogs for many years and only once has any of the puppies that have had umbilical hernias ever had to have theirs closed by surgery. SMALL ONES CLOSE ON THEIR OWN. There is no reason to spend the extra money on unnecessary surgery. I guarantee you that your vet will tell you exactly what I'm telling you.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:25 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DraftyAiresMum    
    If you don't know what kind of issues the breed(s) is/are prone to, it can cause a lot of headache (and heartache) later down the road.
    I've done my research on the breed, and know the health/behavioral issues that come with them.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:29 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caleybooth    
    SRCM16, don't discount the first puppy just because of a hernia. That is absolutely not as big of a deal as some of the people on here are making it out to be. Go see the puppy first and look at the hernia first hand. If it's large or hard, then you might want to pass on the pup. BUT if it's small and soft, I wouldn't hesitate to purchase the puppy. I've been breeding dogs for many years and only once has any of the puppies that have had umbilical hernias ever had to have theirs closed by surgery. SMALL ONES CLOSE ON THEIR OWN. There is no reason to spend the extra money on unnecessary surgery. I guarantee you that your vet will tell you exactly what I'm telling you.
    The person is 3+ hours away, and the puppy I'm going to see this weekend is the next town over, so it'll save me a trip.
         
        01-18-2012, 07:30 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SRCM16    
    I've done my research on the breed, and know the health/behavioral issues that come with them.
    Good to hear. Soooooooo many people get a dog thinking "Oh, it's cute!" only for it to end up in the shelter because the people couldn't handle it or its inherent issues.
         

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