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Beating depression and anxiety without drugs?

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        06-12-2013, 06:18 PM
      #21
    Showing
    I would have set the phone to silent and put it away for a few hours to give yourself some space to calm down. Then go do something you love, like hang with friends or your horse or go ride, etc.

    You can assign a silent tone to that contact as well so when they call/text you don't necessarily hear it.

    :) You shouldn't ever feel trapped
    GamingGrrl likes this.
         
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        06-12-2013, 06:23 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    Oh I like the idea of making it a silent ringtone!

    I'm going to do that now
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        06-12-2013, 08:19 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    Also, are there any certain people that you entirely trust/are comfortable with?
    If you feel like you are having a terribly crumy day and its just been started (Or almost over, doesn't matter) maybe see if you can have that person spend the day with you, or talk to them over the phone ect. (:
         
        06-12-2013, 08:55 PM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxesdontwearbowties    
    Also, are there any certain people that you entirely trust/are comfortable with?
    If you feel like you are having a terribly crumy day and its just been started (Or almost over, doesn't matter) maybe see if you can have that person spend the day with you, or talk to them over the phone ect. (:
    I have a few friends I think I could do this with. Thanks for the advice! :)
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        06-12-2013, 09:07 PM
      #25
    Trained
    I didn't read the whole thread, unfortunately, out of time, but here we go for my rushed advice.

    First off, it's no coincidence once cars were invented that the depression rate skyrocketed, and that is why people are always saying exercise. It releases endorphins into your body, and makes you feel better.

    Are you one to self harm? I was. What helped me if whenever I felt like I was going to cut, I would rub ice cubes on my arms instead. It was still uncomfortable and satisfied my need to get a sensation, but it wasn't hurting me at all. I weaned myself off the ice cubes later. If I felt like I wanted to not eat, I would call my friend and tell her. She knew I was one to starve myself so she would come get me and take me out to dinner with others, so seeing others eat, made me eat.

    Try and get out to the movies, or lunch with friends, once or twice a week. Make a regular "Every friday" or any day thing, where you get together and go out. Something to look forward to.

    Tea helps.

    So does finding an interest. When I feel hopeless these days I get on tumblr, because it makes me laugh with its posts. Anywhere, real or pixelated, that makes you feel good is a good place to be. Reading a book too. Youtube videos. Writing in a journal. Whatever can make you laugh.

    Good luck!
    GamingGrrl and Bagheera like this.
         
        06-12-2013, 09:17 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    Thank you!

    I used to self harm, but I haven't for almost 2 years now. which is something I am very proud of.
    I like the idea of having set "hang out" times, I'll have to see if that'll work for me, most of my friends hardly have a free moment between work and college. I'm looking forward to getting my GED and enrolling in college and having more opportunities to make friends.
    I'm also obsessed with tumblr, I'll have to follow more comedy blogs I guess.
    Posted via Mobile Device
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        06-12-2013, 11:13 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    Hey Gaming Grrl,
    I totally know where you are coming from. I've had anxiety and depression for 6 years now, and for the last year, I finally came around and started living my life a little more. I do medicate. However, I do understand where you're coming from with the "no medicating" viewpoint. I hope to get off mine in the next couple of years. They definitely have kept me on the right track, but sometimes you have to go through a lot of different meds before you find the right one. Anyway, things you can do.

    You asked how to stop panic attacks. I've found it's better to be proactive and stop the panic attack before it starts. You do have to be quite conscientious. The moment you start feeling worked up, start taking deep, slow breaths in and out. Tell yourself that you are safe, or any statements that are comforting and TRUE. Don't say, "I'm okay," because that's lying to your brain; you're not okay at that point. Saying, "I'm safe here," is usually a true statement; your home is safe or most places that you are. Also, don't use judgmental statements. Don't tell yourself that you're screwed up or stupid because that will make it worse. Instead, acknowledge your fear. "I am scared of fighting," or whatever is causing you to panic helps your brain relax. Keep your mind focused on other things too. Can you find some tasks to complete that are not strenuous on the mind but distracts it?

    For general advice, keep your plate full. Don't allow yourself to sit around and worry or fret over whatever is bugging you. Make time for relaxing activities, strenuous activities, fun activities, and fulfilling activities. Also, try to make a routine for your days and keep organized - this helps me a lot. Find the little things in your days that make you smile. Allow yourself to laugh, and try to take things lightly.

    As for health, I have heard exercise is great, but I'm not good at it, and I know eating healthy will make you feel better too, but I'm glued to donuts and sugar. ;) One thing I do practice is getting my eight hours of sleep. It's crazy what a dramatic difference it makes for me.

    Oh, and do find a good counselor for you, one that you click with. They can teach you lots of ways to manage your anxiety and depression. Two years ago, I was going weekly to counseling. I'm now down to monthly or even longer, and I no longer need it as much.

    You can always PM me about this kind of stuff. I went through a really dark period in high school, and I know it's a hard thing to deal with.
    Bagheera likes this.
         
        06-13-2013, 01:38 AM
      #28
    Weanling
    I've had depression since as far back as I can remember. I refuse to take medication. I can understand where you are coming from. It's scary. You worry that it will change who you are, or that it would have adverse effects on you, like making you more depressed. I have those fears too. Medication does have its place though. As others have recommended, find a good therapist. Someone who can teach you to retrain how you react in potentially anxious situations. Try different therapists till you click with one. Hopefully they can help you learn to identify your triggers and how to change your reactions and perceptions in a stressful situation.

    Exercise regularly. I don't mean just going out and riding your horse. I like to go swimming. It gives me a workout, makes me feel good, and is super relaxing. Plus it is a zero impact type of exercise which is great for helping injuries. If that isn't for you, try something else.

    I take a vitamin B supplement. It helps with my energy levels. I am also anemic, so I take iron, which also helps with my depression. (Do not take an iron supplement unless you truly need one. You can fatally overdose on iron. Talk to a doctor before starting an iron supplement.) Anemia can play into depression very heavily.

    Make sure you get at least 7 hours of sleep every day. It makes a big difference. Also, sun exposure helps lift my mood. I'm not saying you should go tanning, but try to be out enjoying the sunshine when you can.

    Diet also plays a big part. Try to eat a healthy, balanced diet. I designate treat days. Every Friday, I buy my lunch. It can be any thing I could possibly want. The other days of the week, I bring my lunch from home and try to ensure it is as healthy as possible. Also, try to eat more fish. The importance Omega-3's in the diet are in lots of depression related articles recently. Studies show that countries that consume more Omega-3 rich foods, primarily fish, have a lower rate of depression. Plus fish taste delicious, IMO. Lol

    Most importantly though, talk to someone. It doesn't matter if it's a friend, family, or a therapist. Being able to talk about these issues makes a world of difference!

    I hope this helps.
         
        06-13-2013, 02:43 AM
      #29
    Weanling
    I've been fighting depression and anxiety since 2007 (I'm 25 now). In the beginning, the thought of getting out of bed would send me into a panic attack, and yet, for the most part, I've dealt with it on my own. I did take a low dose of Zoloft during a 6-8 month period when there was so much going on I couldn't bear it out by my own control (losing jobs, nearly losing our home, that sort of thing).

    Anyways, in terms of depression, something that has been surprisingly helpful for me has been chiropractic adjustments. I have some major misalignments in my neck which damages both blood flow and nerve conduction which can contribute to feelings of depression and anxiety, as well as a host of other problems I was dealing with, like migraine headaches. Being a horse person and all that you probably subject your back to, it may be worth checking into, and (at least where I live) it's not very expensive. (I don't mind sharing, a complete series of x-rays, and my first adjustment cost about $120 and now I'm paying $37.50 for my regularly scheduled adjustments, that's full price. No health insurance.)

    For the anxiety, something pretty small and insignificant for most people has made an amazing difference for me. I am a huge fan of the tv show Doctor Who on the BBC (BBC America, Netflix), and in one episode the Doctor told someone that "Rule 7" is "Never run when you're scared." Probably because of the connection I have with that show and the Doctor in particular, that really resonated with me. For quite some time now, I've been drawing a Roman numeral 7 on the inside of my wrist so I can glance at it whenever I feel the anxiety building and the desire to flee a situation. It's helped so much that I'm considering making that "VII" my first tattoo. (I swear I'm not making this up. I know it probably sounds ridiculous, but it works for me.)

    I should also tell you that right now I'm in school earning my PhD in Psychology. Now, I'm not a clinician, I'm not going to be a psychiatrist or anything like that, but I can tell you from both my own experience and my schooling that you have to find what works for you. Depression and anxiety are both very personal, and unique to the person experiencing them.

    Be ruthless if you have to. Just take control of the situation. I had to temporarily cut people out of my life who were making things difficult for me, just to allow myself time to heal. Later, when I was stronger, I could let them back in. When you figure out what you need to do to get control of your depression and anxiety, don't let anyone else get in your way. If you don't have your health, you don't have anything. Just the fact that you're talking about your struggles in a public forum is a big deal and tells me that you're ready to get past these issues.

    Good luck to you.

    OH! Nearly forgot - two things I did find out medicine-wise in the course of working through my depression was that I have both an underactive thyroid and a vitamin deficiency, both of which can (of course) contribute to anxiety and depression. Both can be checked by a blood draw. For the thyroid, I have to take an itty-bitty pill once a day every day, and have my levels checked annually. For the vitamins, I just take an over-the-counter multivitamin.
         
        06-13-2013, 04:17 AM
      #30
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BadWolf    
    For the anxiety, something pretty small and insignificant for most people has made an amazing difference for me. I am a huge fan of the tv show Doctor Who on the BBC (BBC America, Netflix), and in one episode the Doctor told someone that "Rule 7" is "Never run when you're scared." Probably because of the connection I have with that show and the Doctor in particular, that really resonated with me. For quite some time now, I've been drawing a Roman numeral 7 on the inside of my wrist so I can glance at it whenever I feel the anxiety building and the desire to flee a situation. It's helped so much that I'm considering making that "VII" my first tattoo. (I swear I'm not making this up. I know it probably sounds ridiculous, but it works for me.)
    People totally underestimate the power of something like a tv show, a book series, a band, etc. In this day in age technology is everywhere, and while a lot of people preach to you "Just go outside, watching tv is unhealthy" I often beg to differ.

    Now, I'm not saying drone into the tv for 20 hours straight, I'm saying that it is totally possible to get a connection to a tv show, music, celebrities, etc. Technology has never been so advanced in previous generations to the point where they were able to become so connected. Sure things can get unhealthy, but that's with relationships and obsessions in general, not specific to technological or fangirl obsessions. I know people who are obsessed with being healthy who actually overworked themselves. Technology is renowned for being bad, but in fact it's just another new thing the next generation is using as a tool.

    For me, I like k-pop and j-rock. It stands for Korean Pop and Japanese Rock. Yeah, I get judged hardcore for it. A lot. I have not a clue what they're saying but I appreciate their music and personalities. The actors and musicians involved in the industry were a whole new breed of people I had never seen before, and they were held to higher standards than normal people. They trained up to 11 hours a day and were never, ever allowed to set a foot out of place. They were punished for doing drugs or being irresponsible. There were often "no dating" rules in a company until you were a certain age. That made me respect them, because they did it as a job and not as a glamour fest. Call me crazy, but watching them perform live makes me happy. Whenever I'm sad I go and watch a variety show featuring my favorite groups or watch a drama, or find out if there's a live stream of something I can watch.

    It's completely understandable to me how someone can love Doctor Who, Merlin, Supernatural, One Direction, The Pretty Reckless, etc. Love who you want. Watch and be a fan of whatever you want. Everyone's mind is different and it is so common these days for kids to flock to the internet, tv, books, etc because they feel rejected by real life.

    I'll be the first to admit that I started in books. I read until I had awful headaches.
    Then I discovered the internet and found a new part of myself there. I got confident.
    I learned so much and met new people (Albeit slowly and carefully) that I gained the confidence from them to find myself on my darkest days in quote on quote, "real life", and if you were to speak to me now you would never know I used to be shy and quiet, having anxiety attacks if even being left alone in a store with strangers. I have given speeches in front of hundreds of people, am instructing and working with people and their horses, and I attribute a good amount of it to the encouragement I got from the people I met here, on tumblr, on facebook, etc.

    Just a thought on a touchy subject of mine...lol carry on~
         

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