DEBATE: Children On Leashes - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Life Beyond Horses > General Off Topic Discussion

DEBATE: Children On Leashes

This is a discussion on DEBATE: Children On Leashes within the General Off Topic Discussion forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-22-2010, 04:32 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    Never seen one and after googling found them are pretty unusual but not totally unprecedented here.

    Honestly, for me putting a child on a leash like an animal raises some questions about human dignity and it how the child experiences the leash. I wouldn't at least tie my child to a table, especially if I left the place myself (I see you didn't tell if that woman who tied her son to a table was there with him or if she didn't).

    Anyways, I see also the point about extremely lively kids and/or dangerous situations with children. I'd prefer a leash to a warrant or a funeral procession any time, of course.

    So I think I'd personally go for a leash only if it was extremely needed. Situations like walking in a huge crowd or along a highway with a very lively kid would be like that.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-22-2010, 04:37 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
    I think anyone who is against a leash has never had kids to watch.
    My only problem with them is they give a false sense of security to a parent. A predator can remove the leash in a crowd if your not paying attention.
    And no I don't have kids but I spent lots of time with my niece when she was a tot. I used a leash whenever we were in a situation where I couldn't carry her.
    With the world as scary as it is, a leash on a child is secondary to hearing an Amber/Adam alert.
    I beg to differ. When my sister was in the Army she was sent to Korea when her son was 3, my parents had him for six months and his other grandparents the other six months. I was still living at home as I was 11 or 12. We never put him on a leash....he has NEVER been put on a leash...he was disciplined when he misbehaved and he knew not to run off because he knew he'd get his little bottom spanked if he did. He's 10 almost 11 now and the best kid I've ever met.

    That's just ONE example. I have been around lots of toddlers/young children...all of whom had been properly disciplined [not leashed] and knew better and didnt run off.
         
        03-22-2010, 04:44 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Goody for you!! You will feel pretty silly when you have two or more children and try to keep track of all of them.
         
        03-22-2010, 04:52 PM
      #14
    Started
    Debate: Spanking children?
         
        03-22-2010, 04:53 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    I assure you, my son is one of those children people stop and stare at in the stores. People speak to each other about his "lack of discipline" or saying "that kid needs a smack" or even tossing thinly veiled insults at me.

    My son is autistic. No, it's not a disorder you can see by looking at him, there are no obvious physical signs. He also has related sensory integration dysfunction, a disorder that makes his brain get jumbled and unable to process certain visual and auditory stimuli. Flourescent lights, the type used in essentially every grocery store these days, are a huge trigger for him. Because of the way his brain works, they are visually like strobe lights to him. He can see the flicker, and it hurts his eyes and gives him headaches. When he was younger, it took only a few moments in a store before he would have sensory overload and be screaming, crying, and flailing. Oftentimes if I could let him down to walk, instead of being pushed in the cart, he could look at the floor and cope much better, however at the 1 1/2 to 2 year old range he couldn't watch the floor and watch mommy to follow at the same time. Leashes saved his life more than once at that stage, and when he was a little bit older we graduated to a transmitter/receiver set that sets off an alarm if he gets more than 10 feet from me, which we still use today, and he also wears at school.

    Just try to bear in mind, next time you see a screaming child at a grocery store and feel like saying something rude to the parent about their lack of discipline. You don't always know what's going on, and your 2 second assessment of the situation might not always be accurate.
         
        03-22-2010, 05:00 PM
      #16
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Indyhorse    
    Just try to bear in mind, next time you see a screaming child at a grocery store and feel like saying something rude to the parent about their lack of discipline. You don't always know what's going on, and your 2 second assessment of the situation might not always be accurate.
    I understand where you're coming from. Though, I have three autistic cousins ages 12,15, and 30. And all levels of autism are different in them. All three of them respect the rules and know how to act in public. Yes, they do act out once in awhile but it's not everyday. The 30 year old has the worst case of autism out of the three of them but he still knows how to act. The only thing we have to remind him of is to keep his voice down, and he always says what's on his mind so if someone is staring at him he will call that person out for it (quite funny actually).
         
        03-22-2010, 05:12 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    I say yes to leashes for some kids. I needed one. I have a younger brother and sister, younger nieces and nephews, and my family fostered. I needed a leash and one little girl we fostered needed one, and there were some neices and nephews that needed them. I would also say yes to leashes at flea markets, malls, and a lot of other public places. Although it doesn't give absolute security, it does helpto slow things down. Sometimes its not that the child isn't disciplined, but that they are just that stubborn. I was the queen of the corner and the spankings when I was little. I was awful! I had no fear, and even after getting in trouble I would act up again.

    When I was little my grandmother put me in the corner for acting up after she gave me a spanking. After about 5 minutes she told me I could get out of the corner when I could be good. I didn't respond and continued to stand in the corner. When they asked me why I looked up and said, "I can't be good." It's funny now, but I was a really mean little kid. It's part of the reason I got a pony when I was 5. I needed something to keep me occupied, and it gave my parents something to hold over my head when I acted up since time-outs and spankings and essays (by 3rd grade I had to write papers when I got in trouble...my mother was an English teacher) didn't work to keep me in line. Had they not had me on a leash who knows where I would have ended up. I don't have memories of being on a leash, so I wouldn't really be too worried about the effect it would have on most children.
         
        03-22-2010, 05:16 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by White Foot    
    I understand where you're coming from. Though, I have three autistic cousins ages 12,15, and 30. And all levels of autism are different in them. All three of them respect the rules and know how to act in public. Yes, they do act out once in awhile but it's not everyday. The 30 year old has the worst case of autism out of the three of them but he still knows how to act. The only thing we have to remind him of is to keep his voice down, and he always says what's on his mind so if someone is staring at him he will call that person out for it (quite funny actually).
    Oh, sure. I expect by the time my son is 12 his under-developed nervous system will have matured enough, or he will have learned enough coping skills in therapy, that he can conduct himself in public quite well. For now, though, he is 6, and not there yet. It's not something I can discipline him into.

    I hear you, about the voice modulation. That's also a big one with my son. Also he tends to say the worse things at the worse times (what kid doesn't?) He went through a stage when he was about 4 that he had a fear of the high-velocity flush toilets used in most public bathrooms. They were too noisy, they hurt his ears. My ex fiance one time took my son and I to an upscale, nice place for dinner. I excuse myself to the restroom, and when the waitress stopped by to inquire about my order, my son said (far too loudly) "Oh, mommy's not here. She went to use the NOISY potty."

    Thanks, kid.
         
        03-22-2010, 05:48 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    I used a child leash on my child when she was a toddler. I was a single mother for the first 5 years of her life and even though I had only one child I used it when we went to stores shopping and other busy places. The reason I started using it was because I went to the grocery store one day and my very strong willed 3 yr old ran away from me while I was shopping. She ran down the store and by the time I caught up with her anyone could have taken her , she was fast! I used it a few more times until she got smart and realized she could take the velcro apart(it had a velcro end that went around her wrist) She started staying with me and then I didnt really use it after that but it worked great for awhile. She is now 10 and can still be a handful but now my husband has my back most of the time : )
         
        03-22-2010, 05:57 PM
      #20
    Showing
    I don't see it as an issue. It's not a matter of discipline but more so of safety. Children regardless of how many times you tell them, are children. They want to see the world, explore. I see them used all the time when I go down to Disneyland, CA and to be honest, I think they are great devices.

    It doesn't hurt the child, in merely helps prevent losing your little one in huge crowds or areas that would be very dangerous to lose a child in.

    I would use them, I don't see anything wrong with them.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Anyone with young children? Vidaloco General Off Topic Discussion 3 12-18-2009 11:53 AM
    Children & Stallions amy Horse Grooming 30 08-16-2009 03:18 PM
    Children at Horse shows Sophie19 Horse Shows 15 05-03-2009 11:45 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:46 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0