Facts about US ...from a different angle:) - Page 2
   

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Facts about US ...from a different angle:)

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        09-07-2010, 04:01 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator


    After reading that I think also I'm very happy I was born in a country that is free and represent Western values.

    I've thought that sometimes earlier too but since things are/have been well here, you just forget it sometimes.
         
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        09-08-2010, 01:50 AM
      #12
    Started
    Very interesting to see another viewpoint.. not that I'm American, but close enough!

    I live so close to the border that I really don't see much of a difference between Americans and Canadians, though I suppose the farther away from the border you go the more extreme the differences. There are certainly somethings that re quite different though..

    I do recall a time when I worked at a White Spot near the border and Americans would always come in, they LOVED White Spot (it's a BC only company, with 2 or 3 stores in Alberta but that's it). Some people would come up, buy huge amount of our coleslaw and then take it back across with them haha.

    I also recall a time at the same restaurant an American guest absolutely freaked because we served a pickle on top of our burgers.. apparently that was just so weird to him! Haha
         
        09-08-2010, 02:38 AM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    American views and others

    This is really cool to read all this stuff from you all. I also live near the Canadian border and enjoy going to Vancouver BC several times a year. I used to go to a horse camp every summer near there. The Canadian kids were very tough and self reliant. They played rough and never complained, and didn't suffer fools lightly.
    One thing I noticed on my most recent trip to Van was that very few people are fat! In the US, there are soOOOOOO many fat people, and I mean FAT! In Vancouver BC folks are very outdoor oriented and I believe that their generally high level of satisfaction with their lives meant that they did not eat to sooth anxiety or bring meaning to daily life. If you go to some places in the US you will be shocked at how fat, and big, people are. What saddens me now is to see how many young people are already the size you might see in a middle aged woman, and they are only in their twenties.
    I lived in Tokyo for 3.5 years, back before you were even born, and when we came back to the US for a couple of visits, after 18 months abroad, I was shocked at how BIG everything and everyone was. We in North America are so used to having more than enough space (and other precious commodities) available to us that we don't have to be conservative or creative in how we utilize it. Japan is SOOO different there. Every bit of space is used, there are very few empty lots or things like large mediums between two parts of a freeway. That's valuable land going to waste! I could go on and on.

    I just wanted to say, persuant to the thread topic, that I have really enjoyed reading the threads from Inaclick. Your view point is really refresshing to hear. We don't want to forget those times. What's the old saying, . . . That which we forget we are doomed to repeat" Or something like that.

    I spent a few weeks in Yugoslavia in mid 1987 and that was an experience. It was sooo different. The thing I remember mostly was the desperate, hardscrabble faces of the people. They weren't very nice to us, but they didn't have the mental energy to do so. They were suspicious and only looked at us as added burden unless we could provide some benefit to them like US dollars or Duetchmarks. Otherwise, they couldn't be bothered with us. They were too interested in their own petty squabbles among the ethnic groups, and their constant shortages of things they needed. They didn't look happy or healthy. Then you would see German tourists go through and they were the picture of health and wealth, and to my dismay, were often much more of "Ugly American" tourist, worse than Americans. I did, however, on my many travels in those years meet Americans overseas who caused me to be embarassed. Especially in Tokyo. So, I felt it my duty to make up for them be being as polite and sensitive to my host country's culture as possible. Speaking the language is #1 to that end.

    So , back to Inaclick. Your English is certainly very good. Your posts are really interesting and don't feel shy about expressing your honest feelings. That truly IS the greatest thing about my country is that we CAN agree to disagreee and still be neighbors. We loudly express our opinions . There is a lot of debate going on now about our relationship with the Muslim world. Although it really hurts to hear Christians saying that they will burn Koran's as a symbol for honoring 9/11, I will defend their right to say this. I hope they will not do this but not because they are not allowed to express their anger toward Islam, but rather we don't need to insult ALL Muslims to express our anger toward the extremists.

    Sorry, I went off there. Wierd.

    That's all for now.
    Caroline
         
        09-08-2010, 02:44 AM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Oh, I forgot that I read this book about a year ago titled "Bliss" and it was about one man's search for the happiest place on earth. He went to Finnland, Iceland, The Netherlands, Moldavia, USA, Dubai, Iceland, Bhutan and some others but can't remember. It is a fascinating read on the nature of "happiness" and whether or not it is a universally measureable state. I won't tell what he finally decided regarding the happiest and unhappiest places on earth. Read it.
         
        09-08-2010, 03:57 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    According to latest studies, the "happiest" people on earth are the Danish people. They hold that record since few years ago consecutively.
    Happiness was regarded as a quantum of:
    - how the individual considers he achieved his personal goals
    - educational values provided
    - how secure / protected an individual feels inside the society
    - how confident they are about their future
    - how happy their are with their current state of being
         
        09-08-2010, 12:31 PM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    It's a pity that I don't know any American in person. Your culture seems to be very warm and social. It'd be very nice to take a trip to USA some day and meet for example some of you who discuss here.

    Also I've heard that western products, for example pantyhoses, were admired in previous Eastern Bloc countries. Even so admired that you, as an individual tourist, were able to use them as money and do business using them.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by inaclick    
    According to latest studies, the "happiest" people on earth are the Danish people. They hold that record since few years ago consecutively.
    Happiness was regarded as a quantum of:
    - how the individual considers he achieved his personal goals
    - educational values provided
    - how secure / protected an individual feels inside the society
    - how confident they are about their future
    - how happy their are with their current state of being
    Now I have to brag, seems we were the 2nd one . Scandinavian countries seem all to be on the top.
         
        09-08-2010, 01:47 PM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    happiness measured

    Ina click, did you read that book? I remember one thing he stressed as a measure of happiness in a people was the amount that they trusted each other and their government. Yes, being able to trust each other was very important. And that is based on the rule of law, and not law enforced by terror nor by graft (bribery). Not that our law system is without flaw, but overall , we can trust each other and the police and the justice system, overall.
    I think this is a legacy of our British beginnings. Mexico is just as rich as the US in natural resources but because of the system of government being entrenched in corruption, they struggle to make the most of their natural gifts. Now, every person from Mexico will be angry at me. I mean no insult. I have lived in Mexico and we Americans can learn a lot from the Mexicans and their "joi d'vivre" (spell?).

    I have never been to Finland or Northern Europe/Scandanavia . I met some Finnish ladies in Japan who were rather reserved. Their language was fascinating to listen to , as it sound unlike any other I have ever heard. They seemed very thoughtful and elegant, ,very well educated and maybe a bit cool to me, but I am very outgoing. .
    Finnish horse lover, it would be very nice if you could visit here and ride with us. I am always delighted to welcome visitor. The Us is SOOO big that you cannot see all of it in one visit, and though we are all one country, the people and landscape are very different from one area to another. I , myself , would love to take a summer to drive around and see the different areas. I have barely seen New York, and I want to see the old south and Maine and Florida. And . . . .
         
        09-08-2010, 02:02 PM
      #18
    Super Moderator
    Yes, that's another thing I've heard. Your American culture is very diverse.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    

    I have never been to Finland or Northern Europe/Scandanavia . I met some Finnish ladies in Japan who were rather reserved. Their language was fascinating to listen to , as it sound unlike any other I have ever heard. They seemed very thoughtful and elegant, ,very well educated and maybe a bit cool to me, but I am very outgoing. .
    Finnishes are considered as a reserved folk. Kind of melancholy is typical for us, just like being very humble or being precise for it that you won't step on someone's personal territory too. Tho it's a bit hard for me to estimate our culture compared to others since I've grown in that culture but don't know others closely enough.
         
        09-08-2010, 02:14 PM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    My son, who is quite the linguist, does a lot of online chatting with people overseas who are also interested in languages. He once said to a Finn, "I would like to learn Finnish". The Finn answered, "Don't even bother to try." Could be interpretted to mean , one: It's not worth the effort as it's such an obscure language. Or , Two: You shouldn't even bother to try as you could never learn our very difficult language well enough. My son did not know which meaning was implied. However, he did comment to me that Finns are very direct and value precision . He would try to say a few words in Finnish to them (learned from books) and they would promptly correct him.
    I see nothing wrong with precision. I love some of the Finnish designs that I see in such things as fabrics and household items and furniture. There is a very sophisticated quality to it that is very attractive.
         
        09-08-2010, 02:33 PM
      #20
    Super Moderator
    ^^In my (Finnish) ears it sounds like this Finnish guy isn't very skilled in online communication or then he's very blunt. I wouldn't use that straight expression without some explanation online where you can't hear tones etc... On the other hand, I'd perhaps say that face to face as a joke, I personally love beating about the bush so I'm perhaps an exception and if you for example follow Finnish media like internet forums etc. you see a lot of 'straight' communication like that. Then it often leads to an open conflict when people become mad at others. So yes... that'd kind of describe a Finn.

    One of the indicators I've heard is a bus example. Let's think that you take a bus and there's just one person besides you and the driver in the bus. Do you take a seat next to that lonely person and start to talk with him or do also you sit alone? I'd say most of Finnishes take a lonely seat since it'd be over a kind of social norm to approach some stranger and start to talk with him in a situation like that, in a situation in which you haven't been invited or which hasn't specially meant for meeting new people.

    What would an American do? .
         

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