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Is insanity ever a defence?

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  • I think i may have insanity problems

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    07-22-2012, 05:31 PM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Poor    
Interesting! I too, was under the impression that you can only manage mental illness…not cure it. Which mental illness can be cured?
HP, it depends on type I suppose. I know several people who had sudden mental issues (behaving not like normal them) while preparing for the college or dissertation (and working extremely hard, with little sleep etc.). One (very smart girl) failed all exams, other guy exploded and screwed the dissertation. I'd call it "brain over-heated". All of them didn't need medications, but the rest and time off from reading and studying.

However true mental illness (when indeed something is wrong with the brain) is not curable from what I know. You can "handle" it, but not fix. And (as someone already pointed out) with meds being so expensive not everyone can even afford them.
     
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    07-22-2012, 05:44 PM
  #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
The signs would be there, though. As every mother finds out in short order, "motherly instinct" is over-rated, and can't be relied on to instruct one on how to properly change a diaper, among most all other things. However, it is extremely powerful in "protect at all costs" - in humans, birds, dogs, pigs, etc.,. I feel that any disorder or even environmental conditions that could over-ride that instinct would be detectable.
We will have to agree to disagree on that point, I know that people can be showing few if any signs of a problem and then melt down. It happens, trust me I know this. We are not talking of any ongoing abuse situation, but of the person, who is maybe a little off, snapping. As I said before, you can see more signs in hindsight, but at the time, there maybe little sign.

It's like people who commit suicide, my nephew threw himself in front of a train, he had been fighting depression for years, he was well medicated, living in a group home with his own councillor, and was by all reports doing really well, looking forward and thinking about independent living.

One night he drove to a bridge, waited for a train and jumped, something must of snapped inside of him, all outward signs were that he was on an upswing and doing well.
     
    07-22-2012, 06:12 PM
  #43
Trained
Golden Horse, a tragedy for your nephew. Please know I am not trying to speak about your nephew's situation specifically and I would never try to.

The important phrases I pick up from your post are "showing few if any signs of a problem" and "outward signs were that he was... doing well." The signs that the outsider(s) see are completely different than what the person in the situation knows to be true.

When I was severely depressed the second time, no one knew. Not even my husband. I was very good at concealing my true situation. If I would have waited for the transport, everyone would have thought it was an accident.

It is not up to the other people to recognize someone's mental illness. We will only be able to see it if 1. The individual allows us to, or 2. It has progressed to an uncontrollable level. We, the outsiders, don't have a choice about that.
     
    07-22-2012, 06:35 PM
  #44
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
The signs would be there, though. As every mother finds out in short order, "motherly instinct" is over-rated, and can't be relied on to instruct one on how to properly change a diaper, among most all other things. However, it is extremely powerful in "protect at all costs" - in humans, birds, dogs, pigs, etc.,. I feel that any disorder or even environmental conditions that could over-ride that instinct would be detectable.
When I came home and told my husband I had PPD he looked at me and said "what are you talking about, your fine". Rose tinted glasses much hubby?? The signs were there, but his brain chose to not see them because he didn't want there to be a problem. I was living in a house with him, his parents, 2 brothers and a sister and not a single one of them thought I had a problem. Due to the nature of "mental health" and it being a bit of a "under the carpet" topic, quite often people don't want to believe there is an issue. I clearly remember standing there with my young baby who was screaming, rocking her, with tears running down my face and his brother and the brother's girlfriend walking in, looking at me saying hi and then making themselves a cup of tea and leaving me to deal with it.

Just today when leaving the inlaws my sis in law (who is 8 months preg, has a 1 1/2 yo and a 3 yo) was in tears and told me she is depressed. I went in and told her mother to give her a call and have a chat with her. The response? Oh she's just tired, she'll be fine. This girl a few months ago said she was depressed but I may as well be banging my head against the wall, because convincing people that depression isn't about having a bad day.

There is still a stigma of sweeping it under the rug, it's not acceptable by many to admit to these issues.

Golden Horse - So sorry to hear about your nephew, and I'm glad years ago you were able to find the help you needed. I can relate all too well, I was over here with no family or good friends.. I had only my husband and his family and felt like a total outcast. To this day I struggle with the lack of support as I haven't gelled with many Irish to a degree that I would consider them good friends.. plenty of acquaintences but nobody I could speak to and feel trust in.
     
    07-22-2012, 07:26 PM
  #45
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple    
When I came home and told my husband I had PPD he looked at me and said "what are you talking about, your fine". Rose tinted glasses much hubby?? The signs were there, but his brain chose to not see them because he didn't want there to be a problem. I was living in a house with him, his parents, 2 brothers and a sister and not a single one of them thought I had a problem. Due to the nature of "mental health" and it being a bit of a "under the carpet" topic, quite often people don't want to believe there is an issue. I clearly remember standing there with my young baby who was screaming, rocking her, with tears running down my face and his brother and the brother's girlfriend walking in, looking at me saying hi and then making themselves a cup of tea and leaving me to deal with it.

Just today when leaving the inlaws my sis in law (who is 8 months preg, has a 1 1/2 yo and a 3 yo) was in tears and told me she is depressed. I went in and told her mother to give her a call and have a chat with her. The response? Oh she's just tired, she'll be fine. This girl a few months ago said she was depressed but I may as well be banging my head against the wall, because convincing people that depression isn't about having a bad day.

There is still a stigma of sweeping it under the rug, it's not acceptable by many to admit to these issues.
That was my earlier point...... the husband or anyone else living w an individual that "snaps" w an infant are just as responsible. A husband that never "spells" his wife of caring for their infant is no less "responsible" for the care of the child. An unhelpful inlaw that is grumpy over a baby crying, etc.,...they, too, are reponsible.

There is a stigma, I was raised w that same, "oh, just get up and "do", depressed people aren't to be tolerated" type of sentiment. Stigma or not, I would have no problem getting a bull horn if necessary and announcing it to the world if I felt there was any chance I would snap, and I would also expect my husband to take action if there were the slightest doubt.
     
    07-22-2012, 08:15 PM
  #46
Trained
No, I disagree generally though I agree specifically. *If* the signs are there, then yes we should act upon it. But, what about when there are no outward signs? How can anyone else be responsible?

Our responsibilities come before that, as parents -- to teach our children that they must always try, but they must also always listen to and respect what their bodies and minds tell them. Also, we must always teach that we can not give so much of ourselves that there isn't enough left for our own well-being.

As each generation passes, I think we are doing a better job in general. Years ago, much was poo-pooed that we now recognize as important symptoms of existing troubles and future liabilities.

If we are all responsible for acting upon others illnesses, then should we all go through the justice system when someone we know commits a horrendous crime? Would it not then be my fault as much as the one who committed the crime since I didn't act when (s)he may have been demonstrating signs of insanity? I think not. We all suffer for it, but we are not all responsible for it.
Golden Horse likes this.
     
    07-22-2012, 09:05 PM
  #47
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple    

Golden Horse - So sorry to hear about your nephew, and I'm glad years ago you were able to find the help you needed. I can relate all too well, I was over here with no family or good friends.. I had only my husband and his family and felt like a total outcast. To this day I struggle with the lack of support as I haven't gelled with many Irish to a degree that I would consider them good friends.. plenty of acquaintences but nobody I could speak to and feel trust in.
It is difficult for immigrants, while we do have friends, and acquaintances, it is difficult as an adult to make those deep bonds of friendship that you may of had before. You move to a new culture where people are already pair bonded as it were, and while you are welcomed, it is hard to become that close to someone.
     

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