Season of Giving- Blood donating
 
 

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Season of Giving- Blood donating

This is a discussion on Season of Giving- Blood donating within the General Off Topic Discussion forums, part of the Life Beyond Horses category
  • Blood drive cant give blood too light
  • Passing out after giving blood

 
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    12-08-2008, 08:56 AM
  #1
Started
Season of Giving- Blood donating

A way to give to your community is through blood donating. I just thought Id post a few stats about it (based on United States). Im giving today and I will continue to give when I can. Someday myself or a loved one could need blood... I would hope that there would be some. Just make sure you eat and drink before and after donating.

The second time I gave blood I was at work. I didnt eat much for breakfast and then right after the donation I was called out to the floor for assistance (was going to eat lunch). Well I was out there for a long time and ended up passing out... on my way down I hit my face on a chair- gave myself a nice black eye. The blood mobile was still there so they assisted me and got some food and sugar in me. A few weeks later they sent over a hooded sweatshirt...lol... I make sure to eat and drink now, It is pretty painless to get the needle in the arm. There are some regulations on who can or can't give blood... but if you don't know you should check it out!!!

(info from: Welcome to Memorial Blood Centers)

DONATING BLOOD


Anyone in good health, at least 17 years old, and at least 110 pounds may donate blood every 56 days.
If all blood donors gave 2-4 times a year, it would help prevent blood shortages.
The actual blood donation usually takes less than ten minutes. The entire process -- from the time you sign in to the time you leave -- takes about an hour.
Giving blood will not decrease your strength.
It takes less than 24 hours for your body to regenerate the fluid volume lost during a donation. You replace red blood cells within four weeks, and it takes eight weeks to restore the iron lost after donating.
You cannot get AIDS or any other infectious disease by donating blood.
Blood centers often run short of type O blood.
Shortages of all blood types happen during the summer and winter holiday months.
Any company, community organization, place of worship or individual may contact their local community blood center to host a blood drive.
People voluntarily donate blood out of a sense of duty and community spirit, not to make money. Blood donors are not paid for their donations.
Much of today's medical care depends on a steady supply of blood from healthy donors.
The #1 reason donors say they give is because they "want to help others."


WHO NEEDS BLOOD

Car accident and blood loss victims can need transfusions of 50 pints or more of red blood cells.
Bone marrow transplant patients need platelet donations from about 120 people and red blood cells from about 20 people.
Severe burn victims can need 20 units of platelets during their treatment.
Children being treated for cancer, premature infants and children having heart surgery need blood and platelets from donors of all types.
Anemic patients need blood transfusions to increase their iron levels.
Cancer, transplant and trauma patients, and patients undergoing open-heart surgery require platelet transfusions to survive.

IMPORTANT NUMBERS

1 cup: How much blood a newborn baby has in his or her body.
1 pint: The rough equivalent of 1 unit of blood or the amount of one whole blood donation.
1 year: Shelf life of frozen plasma.
3: the number of lives saved by one pint of donated blood.
3.4 pints: the average red blood cell transfusion.
4: The number of main blood types: A, B, AB and O. AB positive is the universal recipient, O negative is the universal donor.
4 steps to donate blood: register, mini-physical & interview, whole blood donation, and relax.
5 days: Shelf life of donated platelets.
10: Number of pints of blood in the body of an average adult.
12 tests (10 for infectious diseases) are performed on each unit of donated blood.
48 gallons: amount of blood you could donate if you begin at age 17 and donate every 56 days until you reach 76 years old.
32,000 pints: amount of donated blood used each day in the United States.
4.5 million: the number of American lives saved each year by blood transfusions.
1 billion: Number of red blood cells in 2-3 drops of blood.
120 days: How long red blood cells live in the circulatory system.
42 days: Shelf life of donated red blood cells.
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IMPORTANT STATISTICS

7%: How much of your body weight blood makes up.
Since a pint is a pound, you temporarily lose a pound every time you donate blood.
1 out of 10 hospital patients needs blood.
Three gallons of blood is used every minute in the United States.
Females receive 53% of blood transfusions; males receive 47%.
94% of blood donors are registered voters.
60% of the U.S. Population is eligible to donate blood. Only 5% donate regularly.
17% of non-donors cite "never thought about it" as the main reason for not giving, while 15% say they're too busy.
Sickle cell disease is an inherited disease that affects more than 80,000 people in the United States, 98% of whom are of African descent. Some patients with complications from severe sickle cell disease receive blood transfusions every month, up to 4 pints at a time.
Plasma, which is 90% water, constitutes 55% of blood volume.
Someone needs blood every 3 seconds.


BLOOD BIOLOGY

Blood fights infection and helps heal wounds.
Red blood cells carry oxygen to the body's organs and tissue.
Platelets support blood clotting and give those with leukemia and other cancers a chance to live.
Apheresis (ay-fur-ee-sis) is a special kind of blood donation that allows a donor to give specific blood components, such as platelets.
One unit of blood can be separated into several components: red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate.
Plasma is a pale yellow mixture of water, proteins and salts.
Healthy bone marrow makes a constant supply of red cells, plasma and platelets.
Granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, roll along blood vessel walls in search of bacteria to eat.
White cells are the body's primary defense against infection.
There is no lasting substitute for human blood.
     
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    12-08-2008, 09:15 AM
  #2
Foal
Good for you! I am a regular blood donor and have been doing pharesis for several years. That process takes longer but they let you watch a movie and you get a t-shirt after. I wish more people would give it a try. Like you said, you never know when it will be your or a loved one that may be the one who needs it.
     
    12-08-2008, 09:53 AM
  #3
Showing
Excellend thread. I'm part of the blood marrow registry actually. Heard about it thru the Canadian Blood Services and went thru the testing to be on their registry. Having been a recipient of blood donations on multiple occasions I take it to heart.
I don't know you really realize how much what something like this does and the fact you are saving a life or multiple lives until you see someone close to you receive one.

You guys should all give yourself a pat on the back.
     
    12-08-2008, 10:20 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
I tried to give blood a few years ago and on the questionaire there was a spot that asked if you had been in certain countries between specific years and I had been in Germany during that time frame. They called my name and said that I couldnt give blood. It was really embarrasing because all the people were looking at me like I tried to give tainted blood.

It is because there was a "mad cow" epidemic then. In fact, we had to eat beans for 3 months (that was our meat replacement). I wonder if they would take my blood? It's been over 20 years since then... I obviously don't have mad cow......
     
    12-08-2008, 11:09 AM
  #5
Started
I just got done giving... I had a 13.5 for my iron count (min. Must be 12.5)... They said that is pretty high for a women.

Glad to hear everyone else doesnt mind giving,

Farmpony- Im not sure what the rules are on that
     
    12-08-2008, 11:25 AM
  #6
Foal
Farmpony- I had to stop giving for a year because I went out of the country. I don't know what the rule is for Germany durring that time period, but you can alway call and ask. That way you are not waisting your time and theirs by making an appointment and getting there just to be turned down due to something like that.
     
    12-08-2008, 12:05 PM
  #7
Started
I have always wanted to donate blood, but I'm not old enough yet. I'm pretty sure it's 18 here in Iceland
     
    12-08-2008, 12:15 PM
  #8
Trained
I am also a regular blood donor. I am signed up to be an organ donor/living organ donor and bone marrow donor too.
I have only been turned away once and that's because my iron count was too low. Thankfully they told me in the office not in front of everyone!
     
    12-08-2008, 04:18 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
I would want to give blood but

1) I haven't weight enough. I'm too light.

2) I'm suffering from emetophobia and I'm afraid that I would start to feel sick if during the giving process.

One of my friends has gave her blood. I really appreciate her and everybody who gives blood. Good job, keep on giving!
     
    12-08-2008, 04:26 PM
  #10
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by farmpony84    
I tried to give blood a few years ago and on the questionaire there was a spot that asked if you had been in certain countries between specific years and I had been in Germany during that time frame. They called my name and said that I couldnt give blood. It was really embarrasing because all the people were looking at me like I tried to give tainted blood.

It is because there was a "mad cow" epidemic then. In fact, we had to eat beans for 3 months (that was our meat replacement). I wonder if they would take my blood? It's been over 20 years since then... I obviously don't have mad cow......
I understand your position. I grew up in Europe during that time period as well. Donation cannot be done because they have no way of checking whether or not we might be carriers of something that was affecting the mad cow breakout. A really unfortunate circumstance for me because I have a rare blood type. One that could really be used. One of the main reasons I joined the bone marrow registry instead.
     

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