3 year old - barefoot, boots, shoes? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

3 year old - barefoot, boots, shoes?

This is a discussion on 3 year old - barefoot, boots, shoes? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Can you put shoes on a 2 year old horse
  • Putting shoes on 2 year old horse

Like Tree44Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-03-2014, 11:01 AM
  #11
Cat
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
^Cat, horse's backs & hocks are still 'open' until around 5 yo at least. IMO riding a 2yo or riding a 3yo is little difference. But I do think it depends on how much riding, what sort, how heavy the rider, etc, as to how potentially damaging it can be. I would advise very little weightbearing at all on a 2-3 yo & only 'easy' riding, no big jumps or high impact on a 3-5yo.

Understanding the reason behind the worry, & the effects, can help us decide how much/young/what sort of riding is appropriate.
Actually the back vertebrae don't close until 5 1/2-8 years of age, so maybe we should wait till then if that is your only deciding factor? Really though - I don't see the point of bringing this into a thread when someone wasn't asking if they should be starting their 3 year old or not.
Cynical25 likes this.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-03-2014, 11:41 AM
  #12
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
^Cat, horse's backs & hocks are still 'open' until around 5 yo at least. IMO riding a 2yo or riding a 3yo is little difference. But I do think it depends on how much riding, what sort, how heavy the rider, etc, as to how potentially damaging it can be. I would advise very little weightbearing at all on a 2-3 yo & only 'easy' riding, no big jumps or high impact on a 3-5yo.

Understanding the reason behind the worry, & the effects, can help us decide how much/young/what sort of riding is appropriate.
Here in Sweden we had a standing rule of thumb, "one should not sit up untill the horse is into the 3d year".
Military Remounts where not accepted untill four years of age where they were would remain under care and ground training. Not untill the 5th year was the remount issued to the regement for service.
We have the same rule in Endurance Competion no horse may start that is not of 5 years of age, figuring from January.
Personaly I would rather give todays fast growing horses an extra year before starting.

I believe you are referring too the Growth Plates loosie, the shock absorbing like cartilage laying between the bones. These need time to develope and in the final stage harden, what we call Drying Out.

Some very good reading if I can get it too work (may need your help!)
Google, Timing and Rate of Skeletal Maturation in horses. By Dr. Deb Bennet.
http://www.equinestudies.org/ranger_..._2008_pdf1.pdf

And YES, shoeing should be held off for as long as possible or untill the horse is fairly developed.

Personal:
My neighbors quarter horse had been shod at 2 was a size 00, when he was 5 he had a size 1?????? And it is said the foot is the first too finish developing?
loosie likes this.
     
    04-03-2014, 12:55 PM
  #13
Started
Oh good grief, lol.

There are 23.5 hours each day where he is NOT ridden, during which time he will STILL be tender footed on hard surfaces. I'm not okay with this.

I am looking to minimize my horses' discomfort 24/7 and asked opinions on providing extra support if he is worked.

We are 3 weeks into our 2nd trim cycle with the new farrier who also does not wish to shoe unless a last resort. Durasole is on it's way, and I am off to research boots...
loosie likes this.
     
    04-03-2014, 03:06 PM
  #14
Foal
I agree with posting some pictures of your horse's feet if you're up to it. Very well may be something in the trim that's causing his tenderness.

Distortion of the toe and heels that aren't in the proper weight bearing position can cause pain.

Bars that aren't kept in check and/or allowed to run out over the sole can in effect thin the sole, making the horse tender footed. Bar material is harder than sole material and when left to smear out over the sole can prevent the sole from generating like it should.

Bars left too long can also embed up into the sensitive structures of the foot and cause a lot of pain when the horse steps on unforgiving ground.

I've had minimal success with Durasole. It can help somewhat, but if there are issues with the hoof that need correcting, it's only a bandaid.
Cynical25 and Roux like this.
     
    04-03-2014, 03:59 PM
  #15
Weanling
If he were my horse and he can be kept comfortable in his paddock and while at rest I would be inclined to lean towards boots while using available sole tougheners and adequate nutrition aimed towards growing a harder healthier hoof (not saying he is getting bad nutrition but there are always supplements and additives that can help)

If you shoe him now at his age it seems to me you will be setting him up for a lifetime of shoes without giving his feet every chance to develop properly.

While I am all for bare foot I'm realistic about the fact that some horses must have shoes to remain comfortable, period.

When I got my gelding two years ago at age thirteen he had been shoed on his fronts for most of his life since being started as a two year old. His sole was paper thin and he was super uncomfortable on all surfaces without shoes constantly bruising and accessing. I had them pulled anyways, put him in a paddock with some soft areas and bought some well fitting boots. I posted close attention to his diet and even closer attention to his feet. Hired the best most reputable bare foot trimmer in my area. This spring for the first time since I got him I'm riding him (or at least my sister is, I'm 10 days from having a baby) comfortably without his boots. It's been a two year battle to get his feet where they need to be but worth all the greif and $50 plus gas mileage trims.

He's a testament it can be done, just takes time, patience and a knowledgeable trimmer.
KylieHuitema, Cynical25 and ecasey like this.
     
    04-03-2014, 04:57 PM
  #16
Yearling
At 3 years old, that baby doesnt have anywhere near adult tough developed feet. Especially if he has been stalled at all. The digital cushion is still fatty, thin and jello like at that age in most horses. You can pinch the bulbs and easily feel this lack of development. It still needs time to become tough and develop strength as the horse matures and gains weight. IME that doesnt happen adequately till they are about 5 or 6. Possibly faster if they are turned out over varied terrain. 24 7 turnout on hard varied ground is great for developing feet provided the trim is correct.

If it were my horse, and what I have done with my babies now that I know what I k now, I don't shoe babies unless its very very short term. Just as I moderate how much riding and what type of excercize I put on a young horse, I also do not confine his feet to steel shoes long term during critical development years. I want them to be used and developed. A month or two isnt a big deal. I boot and pad as needed to use the horse and I turn them out 24-7 with active horses that move around alot.

As the DC develops between 3 and 5 or so with long slow miles, his soundness over tougher terrain will come. Shoes can and often do inhibit proper development of the young horses foot. Not always with good farriers but I find them to be a rarity, Not the standard.
loosie likes this.
     
    04-03-2014, 06:27 PM
  #17
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat    
Actually the back vertebrae don't close until 5 1/2-8 years of age, so maybe we should wait till then if that is your only deciding factor? Really though - I don't see the point of bringing this into a thread when someone wasn't asking if they should be starting their 3 year old or not.
Actually if you read my post, you will see I said 'around 5 at least'. You may also notice I said nothing of the sort about 'only factors' or even that I wouldn't consider riding at all until then either, although it's a very valid concern. 'The point' - aside from informing people who may not realise how physically immature the horse is at that age, so cannot make an informed decision about what may be too much for him - is that physical development, of the feet & body is indeed very relevant to the decision about shoes or not IMO. I don't see your point in arguing about this??
amigoboy and greenhaven like this.
     
    04-03-2014, 07:04 PM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cynical25    
...NOT ridden, during which time he will STILL be tender footed on hard surfaces. I'm not okay with this.

I am looking to minimize my horses' discomfort 24/7 and asked opinions on providing extra support if he is worked.

We are 3 weeks into our 2nd trim cycle with the new farrier who also does not wish to shoe unless a last resort. Durasole is on it's way, and I am off to research boots...
OK, sounds like he has unusually sensitive & unhealthy hooves, if he's 'uncomfortable' 24/7. I would be absolutely protecting his feet, *as part of* the plan to get him sound. As mentioned, diet, nutrition & environment are very important 'ingredients' as well as good hoof mechanics/trimming. So, if you would like specific opinions/suggestions, you can post hoof pics(see link in signature line below) and info on diet, etc.

I would consider rehab boots, such as Easycare RX, if he needs 24/7 protection. These are designed for it, while most other boots are not appropriate or can have issues if left on for long periods. BUT these boots aren't built for riding in, tho if he's sore anyway, I wouldn't be riding him at all yet. At very least wait until he's 'paddock sound' before seeing how he goes ridden in padded boots.

Of course, there are other methods of protecting his feet in the paddock - that just aren't as practical or durable as boots - foam rubber duct taped to the hooves for one. I wouldn't rely solely(pardon pun!) on something like Durasole to 'protect' as if the sole is so thin, it will still be at risk of bruising & other damage & I wouldn't put these chems on the frog either, which could possibly be more of the issue.
     
    04-05-2014, 10:35 AM
  #19
Yearling
PROPER shoeing on a three year old will not in any way inhibit the future development of his hooves. The important factors are the same as proper trimming.......insuring frog support, adequate heel trim, flare reduction and eased breakover all around the foot . So a thinner lightweight training plate will not harm him at all as long as the trim and shoe fit are correct.
As to cause of thin soles in a three year old, it is not always from improper hoofcare or management. It can be genetic.

I once bought a weanling TB at a sale and raised him with my other TB colt that I had bred. At three years old the one I purchased had the worst hooves imaginable with paper thin soles and breaking out tissue paper thin hoofwalls. He had been on the same diet, same field, same everything as the one I bred (and of course same trimming) .I was riding the one I bred barefoot on all surfaces I could barely LEAD the one I bought across gravel. It turned out his sire was notorious for throwing really bad feet. So bad quality hooves is not always from improper care or hoofcare.
waresbear, Cynical25 and Roux like this.
     
    04-05-2014, 10:37 AM
  #20
Yearling
PS I would much rather put shoes on one than risk him developing pedal osteitis from chronic trauma to the coffin bone edges through thin soles.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Barefoot vs. Shoes jillybean19 Endurance Riding 54 06-25-2013 12:12 AM
Boots or Shoes with Studs Or Barefoot on Slippery Surface Cintillate Hoof Care 9 01-04-2013 09:54 PM
Shoes,boots or barefoot Diegosmom Trail Riding 24 05-03-2012 11:27 AM
shoes vs barefoot triggetpony Horse Health 16 06-30-2011 05:13 PM
Going from shoes to barefoot appylover31803 Horse Health 8 06-09-2009 02:11 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0