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Arrogant farriers/trimmers

This is a discussion on Arrogant farriers/trimmers within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
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    04-04-2013, 03:13 AM
  #31
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by clippityclop    
Here's a thought for those who home trim - I am self taught - I didn't go to farrier school or anything like that. I've been trimming and shoeing horses for over 20 years and no, I don't do it for other people or for money, I do it simply b/c I CAN and plus, each horse gets its own special trim/shoes that fit its lifestyle/job/way of going/etc at that particular point in time. I've been a distance rider for 25+ years and I've enjoyed being able to tend to each horse's particular needs depending on the job/ride/terrain/weather coming up. It doesn't get better than that.

I can trim/shoe for navicular, wedge, vettech sole/hoof wall repair, natural balance, pads, etc and have played with some of the synthetic nail on shoes. Most of the time my horses are in Easyboot Epics, too, b/c it is backbreaking work. It is simply a hobby I enjoy being proficient at like gardening or playing the piano - not to mention it gives me a great toned look to my body especially during bikini season. Plus, friends like it when we go camping at state parks for a week and know that a lost shoe isn't the end to a perfectly good week of riding.

I say if you are home trimming already (and a bunch of folks do that), take it a step further and learn the art of shaping and setting shoes. Not to mention how much money you would save in the long run. Sometimes there just isn't any other way to do it than to do it yourself.
I so, so badly want to. But I don't know where I would go to learn. There are very few good farriers within a reasonable distance of where I live. I only know the one lady who's good at barefoot, and the one man who does a nice job of shoeing, and the rest of the farriers I know are completely useless. One just doesn't turn up, one is always late, and neither can trim to save themselves. There are a couple more totally useless farriers who I know but who are lovely with the horses, so it's a darn shame they aren't better at their job... they of course have been in it so long that they don't like to be told how to do their job, especially from someone with only a couple of years of experience.
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    04-04-2013, 07:45 PM
  #32
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
Well, in all fairness - I am sure farriers have to deal with some real "interesting" clients. I don't think everyone takes into consideration stuff like if they get hurt, it is their livelihood at steak.
You're correct on that, but I do The only reason I don't do my own trimming anymore is because I can't.

I make sure my horses are well-mannered for any professional that needs to poke and prod them.

Before the rehab farrier set foot on my property, he asked the vet what my horses were like to work on. Had the vet given the wrong answer, he would not have showed up.

To clarify some other thoughts on various posts, there's a big difference between someone being gruff and someone displaying an arrogant attitude.

I'm ok with gruff, it's the arrogance that puts a burr under my saddle.

Now if they're both, I might just smack them silly, hand them $20 for gas before they start on a horse, and send them out the drive
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    04-04-2013, 08:40 PM
  #33
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
You're correct on that, but I do The only reason I don't do my own trimming anymore is because I can't.

I make sure my horses are well-mannered for any professional that needs to poke and prod them.

Before the rehab farrier set foot on my property, he asked the vet what my horses were like to work on. Had the vet given the wrong answer, he would not have showed up.

To clarify some other thoughts on various posts, there's a big difference between someone being gruff and someone displaying an arrogant attitude.

I'm ok with gruff, it's the arrogance that puts a burr under my saddle.

Now if they're both, I might just smack them silly, hand them $20 for gas before they start on a horse, and send them out the drive
haha...smack 'em silly, I haven't heard that for a while.

Yeah, I saw the aftermath directly following a horrible accident involving a farrier when I was young. Not involving my horse, though. After that, I have always tried to be very considerate of "their side of the deal", and describe my horse's temperments concerning foot work in great detail...probably to much detail in their view.
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    04-04-2013, 08:49 PM
  #34
Banned
My farrier is extremely arrogant, and he knows it. It's also ok, because he is absolutely the best in our area. He's hard to book some times as he does so much continued learning, and he is in Florida with show horses over winter. He also charges for that knowledge, $200 for a set of 4 shoes, but it takes him about 90 mins per horse, as he is a perfectionist.

Often times, he is at my barn, and will take a call while at his truck and I hear him saying different names of farriers I have used, as he is given them advise over the phone.

He will not work on a horse with dirty or wet legs, and that's fine with me, and just manners on the horse owners part. He doesn't mind waiting if you have to clean and towel as long as it is not every time.

If you are interested, he will take all the time you need to explain everything to you, and he encourages you to be interested, but if not, he will still do his job.

He is very arrogant about his work - but not in general. We have a drama filled boarder who usually flirts with him when she is there. Last time, she wasn't there and a few of us were joking with him about it, and he was laughing it off.
I told him it was only because he is a farrier, and if he was bagging groceries, he'd be doomed. He responded, that he looked in the mirror when he was about 17 and realized he needed to be a vet or a farrier. :)


I love my farrier, he is worth every arrogance, and he is worth every penny. I don't pay him to be boyfriend material, I pay him to do a really good job with my horse.
     
    04-08-2013, 09:42 PM
  #35
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
What is our recourse if the horse winds up so sore it can hardly walk?
While I don't know how the legalities may work, and of course it's not a given that the farrier(or trimmer) is necessarily at fault when a horse is lame after a visit, but I think too many people take what they're told on blind faith & accept 'sore after a trim' or some such as just the way it is. If more people a)had a clue & b)held the farrier accountable & refused to accept bad treatment, farriers (& trimmers) would be more careful(& thoughtful) of their behaviour & practices.

One other thing that seems to be the norm amongst farriers that drives me crazy is what I call 'farrier disease'(tho maybe I'm being unfair & it's a general 'tradie's disease') - that is, being reliably unreliable, not returning phone calls, not bothering to ring when running late or can't turn up, etc. Granted, s**t happens & in working with horses(not to mention owners!), you can almost guarrantee that schedules are hard to stick to, but what's wrong with giving an 'ish' time & explaining that to a client?? What's wrong with having the courtesy to ring them if you're running very late or something's come up?? What's wrong with letting someone know you don't want their business or such, rather than leave them hanging?? I actually happen to think that aside from other reasons, it's also good business practice to treat your clients with a bit of 'common' courtesy & respect.
     
    04-08-2013, 10:03 PM
  #36
Showing
Loosie, I'm not a diva owner. I willing to work with unforeseen schedule changes as it goes both ways. My horses have good manners and are excellent when having their hooves done. I didn't fall off the turnip truck so in two years if I ask one question, I expect a respectable answer. Arrogance costs customers.
     
    04-08-2013, 10:07 PM
  #37
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
One other thing that seems to be the norm amongst farriers that drives me crazy is what I call 'farrier disease'(tho maybe I'm being unfair & it's a general 'tradie's disease') - that is, being reliably unreliable, not returning phone calls, not bothering to ring when running late or can't turn up, etc. Granted, s**t happens & in working with horses(not to mention owners!), you can almost guarrantee that schedules are hard to stick to, but what's wrong with giving an 'ish' time & explaining that to a client?? What's wrong with having the courtesy to ring them if you're running very late or something's come up?? What's wrong with letting someone know you don't want their business or such, rather than leave them hanging?? I actually happen to think that aside from other reasons, it's also good business practice to treat your clients with a bit of 'common' courtesy & respect.
THIS really gets my goat - we have farriers in town who are notorious for just not turning up.

As I slowly collect "clients" [I will reiterate I am a HOME TRIMMER not a professional in any sense of the word, I can maintain but I can't actively correct... but I AM better than a few farriers, and more reliable than nearly all of the farriers in my area], I'm always careful to keep any and all appointments. I'm not fit enough to trim day in and day out and don't have enough "clients" for that anyway, but the one thing that I've noticed way too many farriers do, is they over-book themselves. Then they either rush and do a bad job, or just don't turn up.
     
    04-08-2013, 10:11 PM
  #38
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
What is our recourse if the horse winds up so sore it can hardly walk?
While I don't know how the legalities may work, and of course it's not a given that the farrier(or trimmer) is necessarily at fault when a horse is lame after a visit, but I think too many people take what they're told on blind faith & accept 'sore after a trim' or some such as just the way it is. If more people a)had a clue & b)held the farrier accountable & refused to accept bad treatment, farriers (& trimmers) would be more careful(& thoughtful) of their behaviour & practices.

One other thing that seems to be the norm amongst farriers that drives me crazy is what I call 'farrier disease'(tho maybe I'm being unfair & it's a general 'tradie's disease') - that is, being reliably unreliable, not returning phone calls, not bothering to ring when running late or can't turn up, etc. Granted, s**t happens & in working with horses(not to mention owners!), you can almost guarrantee that schedules are hard to stick to, but what's wrong with giving an 'ish' time & explaining that to a client?? What's wrong with having the courtesy to ring them if you're running very late or something's come up?? What's wrong with letting someone know you don't want their business or such, rather than leave them hanging?? I actually happen to think that aside from other reasons, it's also good business practice to treat your clients with a bit of 'common' courtesy & respect.
     

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