Bacterial Hoof Infection.
 
 

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Bacterial Hoof Infection.

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  • Copper toxinfor horses with bad hoofs
  • Bacterial in the hoof

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    09-14-2011, 05:34 AM
  #1
Green Broke
Bacterial Hoof Infection.

Recently, I noticed something odd was going on with Chinga's two front hooves, so I decided I'd push my farrier appointment a few weeks earlier and scratch from my competition that weekend. I felt it was better to be safe than sorry.

He came out and quickly agreed that something was wrong. He did some investigating and he discovered that Chinga had a Bacterial Hoof Infection. Due to all the wet weather and rain we have had here - even though we've been taking steps to prevent this - oiling them every day + cleaning them twice a day.

The infection is quite bad, but its not infection him in a way where it is negatively affecting him to be worked - I've been assured of this and done my own research to confirm it. Though if it does become any worse, I'll be looking at having him out of work for 6-12 months. Though being able to ride him is really my last concern - first being his own safety and health. If riding him was risking making things worse in any way I would stop.

Now, we're trying to clear up the infection - by using a Copper Sulphate & Vaseline mix. The Vaseline is being used only to deliver the Copper Sulphate which kills any bacteria, we're doing this every second day - recommended as the best treatment by two farriers. Plus the farrier cut out a small part of the hoof to where the infection is, so that the Copper Sulphate has access to the infection.

So basically, the infection has three months to heal. Otherwise - we look at giving him six to twelve months off work - put him in spell. Than, if this doesn't work we look at retiring him as a pasture horse for the rest of his like. Due to what would have to be done to clear up the infection, would make him unable to be ridden.

As some of you know, at the beginning of the year I had a different type of issue with his hooves. I took him away to our annual trip to the farm and the weather became quite bad - rain and storms. Causing his hooves to become 'soft' and he threw both his front shoes. We took him into a farrier in town because he is a horse which needs continuous shoeing otherwise he becomes 'surface lame'. We found a farrier which seemed to have a very good reputation and asked him to do Chinga's hooves. He obviously was not good, Chinga threw both the shoes within five days and we put this down to his feet being soft from the weather.

Back in our home State - Queensland, there was bad flooding. We had to return home, but we decided it was not safe to risk bringing Chinga home - roads closed, flooded. We made the choice to leave him there under the care of the farm hands. He was taken care of quite well. Except, once I got him home two months later we became quickly aware he was lame. We got our farrier out who then informed us that the farrier that we had used while we were away, had incorrectly placed the hooves. Damaging Chinga's hooves. Our farrier - has spent the first six months of the year working with us to get them back nice. Than this happens.


     
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    09-14-2011, 06:11 AM
  #2
Trained
I'm assuming he's got white line disease/seedy toe? If so - be careful. You don't want it to get too bad as it will spilt the wall from the rest of the horse and giving you and Chinga a world of grief.
Good luck!
     
    09-14-2011, 12:20 PM
  #3
Foal
So basically, the infection has three months to heal. Otherwise - we look at giving him six to twelve months off work - put him in spell. Than, if this doesn't work we look at retiring him as a pasture horse for the rest of his like. Due to what would have to be done to clear up the infection, would make him unable to be ridden.

Oh my! What a terrible prognosis for thrush! So unnecessary and saddens me!
Thrush loves to thrive in a negative pH situation. That negative pH situation can happen internally with too much sugar/starch in the diet. It can weaken a hoof to allow thrush in, just like too much wet can weaken a hoof and allow thrush in. So check the diet and add up all the NSC and see what you get. It should be 16% or lower.
You'll need to find a way to allow the hoof to dry out, hopefully on shavings overnight. I'd clean the hoof before bedtime, not medicate, but think "air" and "dry". In the morning I'd medicate/boot and turn out.
I know for sure that I don't agree with hoof conditioner. The hoof has its own waxes and oils that do a great job and allow the hoof to breathe at the same time. You must have faith. Adding gunk, just holds the moisture in and suffocates the ability of the hoof to breathe and regulate itself. The same with the vaseline. Also not necessary. I see the vaseline as a barrier to not allowing the copper full contact with the hoof/suffocating and locking in moisture again. I have NoThrush and just puff it in the grooves on each side of the frog and use a toothbrush to spread it all over the frog and even up over the heel bulbs and down into the sulcis crack. Copper is magic and feeding minerals also delivers copper to the hoof. Wait until you see what it does for the coat color! I turned a horse from bay to jet black IN the summer sun last year and the hoof health came right along with it.
What would really give you a good starting boost would be White Lightning or Clean Trax. You can also get the gel, but soaking has more reach. Definitely be doing this if the horse has seedy toe. And is a great idea for a hoof that has deep thrush.
How to clean the hoof? Don't soak too long in the face of this wetness outside, scrub with stiff brush and clean that hoof like its a dinner plate and you are about to eat off it. Know that thrush is deep and that you have to clean down in there to get to its leading edge of infection. If you don't, that leading edge will stay hidden and continue to eat away, while you think that things are looking ok on the surface. Use Q-Tips to clean right down to the bottom of the sulcis crack...find the bottom and clean it good. As it heals, the crack will get shallower. It should be a mere thumbprint depression on top of the frog, not a crack at all. I'd put copper on that Q-Tip and medicate the same way. Also stuffing a medicated cotton ball in that crack will stay there when outside and provide a barrier between wet and medicated/infected surface. You're doing well when that cotton ball won't stay in there anymore.
Bottom line is that the hoof needs a chance to dry out more and be more resilient to the wet outside. The softened hoof wall is more easily dictated to by torque and pathology worsens quickly as well. Use the No Thrush on any developing skin conditions from the wet as well...magic stuff!
If you have shoes on and he's out of work, I'd pull them and let him have his foot back. The improved mechanism will help a lot. Padded boots will protect from the wet, protect from the ground, put the frog to work and start building a stronger hoof. Many think that with thrush gone that the hoof is ready to go, but then run into abscesses that sideline them again. Use the boots to develop, go after the thrush cause you can't build a hoof when its being eaten away and dry out sessions to improve hoof integrity and strength. Get a good balanced barefoot trim and maintain it to insure good mechanism and healing. Get him comfortable, then......make him move and walk away from all these problems. You do your homework?.....3 months or less.
Hope this helps....
     
    09-14-2011, 12:35 PM
  #4
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChingazMyBoy    

Now, we're trying to clear up the infection - by using a Copper Sulphate & Vaseline mix. The Vaseline is being used only to deliver the Copper Sulphate which kills any bacteria, we're doing this every second day -
I am confused as to Vaseline being a carrier? Typically we use it as a barrier to prevent things from getting in - such as under a draining wound so the drainage does not eat away at the hair and skin.
     
    09-14-2011, 12:40 PM
  #5
Banned
To add to MLS' question, wouldn't adding Vaseline to the mix keep moisture trapped in there?
     
    09-14-2011, 05:08 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Hi all, thanks for your advice.

I personally have not spoken to my farrier - my mother was there as I was in classes that could not be missed. My mum also managed to forget what the infection is called, however remembered everything.

The Vaseline - I'll be sure too look into this some more. But talking to quite a few horse people it seems to be a commonly used method around here, though I will be sure to look into Alwaysbehind's question some more.

Sorry, I don't have time to reply much. I have to go to classes.
     
    09-14-2011, 10:40 PM
  #7
Banned
Call your farrier and see exactly what the infection is. Thrush?
sierrams1123 likes this.
     
    09-14-2011, 11:01 PM
  #8
Weanling
Has anyone recommended Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar as a hoof soak? My friend's horse had Thrush and she soaked his hoof in a mixture of 50/50 water/ACV (the organic kind, not the Wal-Mart kind). She also filled a spray bottle and cleaned his hoof several times a day and gave it a few squirts with the H2O/ACV mix until he was better. She said it worked well.

I personally haven't tried this as my horse and pony thankfully never had Thrush, but some of the other mixes out there are Lysol/H2O, Borax/H20 and Bleach/H2O that I've heard of, but the H2O/ACV mix doesn't seem quite as, well, harsh as those. I don't think I would ever soak my horses hoof in bleach or Lysol. Maybe Borax, but the ACV seems better and I know a lot of PEOPLE that use it for Thrush.

She now soaks his feet weekly when the weather is wet with the H2O/ACV solution and swears it's why she is not having any more problems (she lives in Louisiana where it is wet and swampy).

It may be worth looking into or giving it a bit of research. I have not, however, ever done this, but I'm trying to throw out some ideas for you because I want your horse to be better.
     
    09-14-2011, 11:25 PM
  #9
Trained
Certainly worth confirming exactly what the infection is. Seedy toe/WLD is more likely than thrush to cause so much trouble, and is less noticable than thrush if you're not looking for it. For straight thrush to get as bad as what you have described, surely you would have picked it up earlier
     
    09-14-2011, 11:33 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2SCHorses    
Has anyone recommended Bragg Apple Cider Vinegar as a hoof soak? My friend's horse had Thrush and she soaked his hoof in a mixture of 50/50 water/ACV (the organic kind, not the Wal-Mart kind). She also filled a spray bottle and cleaned his hoof several times a day and gave it a few squirts with the H2O/ACV mix until he was better. She said it worked well.

I personally haven't tried this as my horse and pony thankfully never had Thrush, but some of the other mixes out there are Lysol/H2O, Borax/H20 and Bleach/H2O that I've heard of, but the H2O/ACV mix doesn't seem quite as, well, harsh as those. I don't think I would ever soak my horses hoof in bleach or Lysol. Maybe Borax, but the ACV seems better and I know a lot of PEOPLE that use it for Thrush.

She now soaks his feet weekly when the weather is wet with the H2O/ACV solution and swears it's why she is not having any more problems (she lives in Louisiana where it is wet and swampy).

It may be worth looking into or giving it a bit of research. I have not, however, ever done this, but I'm trying to throw out some ideas for you because I want your horse to be better.
Thanks a lot. I'm going to contact a few farriers that have been recommended by others. My farrier himself has been recommended and I do prefer him working with my horse over another one. His educated, experienced and his also had the past three years working on my horses hooves.

Chinga has very 'difficult' hooves - for a lack of a better word. We've had many challenges and spent quite a bit of time getting them corrected and what not after racing. However, if I heard a negative word about my farrier or felt that there was another one which was more beneficial for my horses well being, I would very easily consider swapping.

Just clarifying - we have been told what is was. But as I mentioned above - my mother was the one getting him looked at due to I had to attend important/unmissable classes. She was trying to remember everything she was told - even though my farrier attempted to explain it in the easiest possible way, she doesn't spend a lot of time doing this sort of thing with horses and struggled to remember it all.
     

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