Barefoot for hard riding is it possible. - Page 4
 
 

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Barefoot for hard riding is it possible.

This is a discussion on Barefoot for hard riding is it possible. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Hard horse riding
  • Gordon naysmith unshod

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    03-02-2012, 10:07 PM
  #31
Banned
Loosie how about the easycare easyboot says they out last steel shoes more spendy but maybe worth the price no velcro to deal with. And how do I measure the hoof to get a good fit? Farrier is coming on the 8th this month so he will have a fresh trim. Do I boot all four or do shoes on front boot the hind. He needs protection on all four that's been proven get sore as in lame sore. And come to think of it my farrier has used that solegaurd on my daughters horse didnt stay put but 10 or 12 days I think that's what is was.
     
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    03-02-2012, 10:14 PM
  #32
Trained
The soleguard stays on best when it's used with a shoe because the farrier can bevel the hoof side of the shoe and give it a really good clean edge to seal against.
     
    03-02-2012, 10:23 PM
  #33
Yearling
Kevin, you know what im saying. Don't be snide. I have more tools in my arsenal than just a trim which many other trimmers seem to be ignoring. I don't need to use or apply metal shoes. I have NO desire to forge or wrestle with metal and I have, and will, happily refer a client to a traditional farrier when necessary. There is room for everyone and you might take note that I actually recommended this person stay shod, albiet in a non traditional shoe. I don't know any farriers who use alot of soleguard without a shoe. I have great success with it however on bare feet. The last horse I did kept his on for 4 weeks in the mud.


OP, the Easyboot trails are made for people who only ride up to 25 miles a week. I don't use them because I frequently ride longer than that. I prefer these when I have a choice and I replace the lower velcro with a buckle strap. The mud does not do well with velcro.

Renegade Hoof Boots. The Real Leader in Hoof Boot Technology!
     
    03-02-2012, 10:27 PM
  #34
Banned
I don't know what was used but the horse did have on shoes. All I know is iv got to get this shoe or not shoe thing figured out. Come may we will be riding every day again and I don't want a repeat of last summer. Stone bruises abcess and weeks of time off from horse being lame. That is my horse not my daughters horse I did look up loosies sight on hoofs lots of info need to read through it again. They are barefoot for 7 months out of every year so not wearing shoes all the time.
     
    03-02-2012, 10:28 PM
  #35
Yearling
Also...You guys might want to check this out...I forsee this as the shoeing of the future as well as the poly shoes. Totally custom and form fitted.

Love it and I want a mold to play with!

Fran Jurga`s Hoof Blog: News from Hoofcare + Lameness Journal: Dubai Horse Hooves Are Being Molded, Not Shod, with Experimental Hoof Application Process
     
    03-02-2012, 10:37 PM
  #36
Trained
^^ That's pretty cool. I'd use that in a second if it was comparable price wise. I'd really like to use it in the winter but I wonder if the cold would effect it.
     
    03-02-2012, 11:49 PM
  #37
Yearling
Yeah I have to admit I like it too. I've made "shoes" with vettec before (but I didn't put a nail groove in them haha.)
     
    03-03-2012, 12:32 AM
  #38
Showing
I really like the idea of the polyurethane/plastic/rubberized shoes, my biggest problem is that they all come in one single shape. They expect each and every horse to have the exact same shaped feet. IMHO, putting a shoe like that on a horse is no different than those backyard whack and tack farriers who put shoes on straight out of the box and then rasp the hoof to fit it.

I do agree though that those molded shoes look very interesting.
     
    03-03-2012, 12:56 AM
  #39
Yearling
Smobs, the GC shoes I use linked above can be nipped to any needed shape and the nails placed anywhere in the shoe as needed. Wider feet can use a bigger shoe and be cut down to a proper fit with the nippers and rasped clean. I've never set one without custom fitting it to that horse. It is very cool with the clear shoes because you see exactly where the nail is going and can place it anywhere in the nail channel and indeed the shoe itself. You are not limited by nail holes. We cut a set down to fit a standard donkey once using just the inside of the shoe with the nail channel cut away so he could have traction on our wooden stage floor. My complaint is they don't make them in enough sizes or colors lol. I like variety.
     
    03-03-2012, 01:46 AM
  #40
Yearling
I won't say what you should do about your horse. That's someone only you make the choice on. A person makes their own choices for their own horses, so you do what you feel is best. No matter what it is there will be someone who agrees with the choice you made and someone who doesn't. So do what you want and be happy, because that's what most of the rest of us are going to do.
I will state that in the 70's Gordon Naysmith rode unshod from southern Africa to central Europe and of course was told not to ride unshod, but did it anyway. It's an interesting story, but for another time. He did say that when he finished the journey he gave the horse to a farmer who complained that a grinder had to be used to trim the feet (or something like that, because the hoof had gotten so hard from the riding....it's been a long time since I read Gordon's account, but I'd recommend if you want to read about a really tough journey on horseback). I'd say that with the miles that he covered on that trip (central Europe is a long way from southern Africa), over often brutal terrain, he pretty much put the nay sayers to rest on the need for horses to be shod for hard riding and hard terrain.
Back in my teens and early 20's (around the same time Gordon was making his epic ride) I worked cattle and did some distance riding (30-40 miles a day, but never had enough free time to ride more than 2 or 3 days) and obviously rode on the highway. Like Gordon I was constantly told (well for a few years) by my vet and some other folks that my horses were going to have problems because I wouldn't shoe them (the hoof will wear too much, split because I ride on pavement, etc, etc, etc,). The vet finally stopped after so many years of my horses never having any foot issues (unless you count getting really hard an issue). 40+ years later I still have never had a shoe put on any of my horses and the only hoof problems I've had to deal with were problems that came with new horses (most of which were shod before I got them).

Ok, now everyone can tell me how if I rode on their terrain I'd need something protecting the feet :)
I'll concede that I haven't ridden everywhere. Not above the Artic Circle (but I've lived in New England and rode there....it got pretty cold, snowy and icy), or in Death Valley (but I rode in AZ when I lived there....some very rocky terrain there and does get pretty hot on the pavement). So I'm not sure what terrain I've missed that my horse would have to have shoes for? Certainly don't need them here. It's some of the softest ground I've dealt with. I have to ride on the paved road to toughen the hoofs up. :)
     

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