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Barefoot Performance Horses

This is a discussion on Barefoot Performance Horses within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        02-28-2014, 05:06 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    Just wanted to give this blog a bump. I see more and more people getting into natural hoofcare and looking for advice on how to manage their horses hooves. So I figure this thread was worth the bump. And if you have the ability to practice what this blog teaches I'm quite sure you'll be pleased with what you see.
    greentree likes this.
         
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        03-01-2014, 09:55 AM
      #22
    Started
    Total freedom, would you be willing to post pictures of your horses' feet? I am very curious how they look 5 months out and details of your management (footing, distance, feed, etc) because while I believe that horses are designed to compensate and do well on their own, I have a tougher time believing that we're capable of giving them what they need to do so in a domestic environment. I'd love to see the success you're having with it and how you've adapted your management to maximize their foot (and presumably other) health.
         
        03-01-2014, 07:28 PM
      #23
    Started
    Thanks for bumping...I'm going to go read now!
         
        03-01-2014, 08:06 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    I was always barefoot and a trainer suggested shoes so my horse would break over better. It made a world of difference in how she moves and looks much better.
         
        03-01-2014, 08:13 PM
      #25
    Started
    Sorry to be Debbie Downer, but I am confused...... We were cruel when we didn't shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we DID shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we didn't keep them trimmed, now we are not supposed to trim them??

    I come by these realizations from a combination of experiences...endurance riding, animal rescue, and show ring experience.

    I LOVE the Rockley site, and really just playing....but I wonder why new horse owners get frustrated?

    Nancy
    loosie likes this.
         
        03-01-2014, 08:42 PM
      #26
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greentree    
    Sorry to be Debbie Downer, but I am confused...... We were cruel when we didn't shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we DID shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we didn't keep them trimmed, now we are not supposed to trim them??

    I come by these realizations from a combination of experiences...endurance riding, animal rescue, and show ring experience.

    I LOVE the Rockley site, and really just playing....but I wonder why new horse owners get frustrated?

    Nancy
    LOLOLOLOL!! You definitely have a point!!!
         
        03-01-2014, 09:46 PM
      #27
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greentree    
    Sorry to be Debbie Downer, but I am confused...... We were cruel when we didn't shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we DID shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we didn't keep them trimmed, now we are not supposed to trim them??

    I come by these realizations from a combination of experiences...endurance riding, animal rescue, and show ring experience.

    I LOVE the Rockley site, and really just playing....but I wonder why new horse owners get frustrated?

    Nancy
    Not to mention "riding on hard, shallow footing causes joint issues" and "soft,deep footing causes muscle/tendon injuries" does occasional road riding not hurt joints? Would driving on the road be better?
         
        03-02-2014, 05:09 AM
      #28
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greentree    
    Sorry to be Debbie Downer, but I am confused...... We were cruel when we didn't shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we DID shoe our horses, then we were cruel if we didn't keep them trimmed, now we are not supposed to trim them??

    I come by these realizations from a combination of experiences...endurance riding, animal rescue, and show ring experience.

    I LOVE the Rockley site, and really just playing....but I wonder why new horse owners get frustrated?

    Nancy
    The confussion can come from so many experts running around giving advise who have very little horse experiance or life experiance for that matter.
    Not much a a fan with all this Natural stuff, very little we do with horses is natural...not for the horse anyway.
    Barfoot/Shoeing:
    Shoeing can be a nessasery evil if we wish the horse too be able to perform.
    We shoe to "prevent" the horse from going lame.

    Nor am I a fan of the Do-It-Yourself Trimmers who think they can go to a couple of week-end seminars and think they are qualified not only to start trimming their own horses feet but other peoples horses as well.

    The Certified Farrier has several months of supervised training and $1000s invested in farrier trade.
    I have seen several cases where the shoer has had to take over the job after some trimmer and found there was one hell of a mess too clean up and very little too work with!

    If people are so keen on working on horses hoofs then they should go to one of the many horse shoeing schools through out the counrty and learn proper trimming and shoeing, that way they would be of service not only to their own horses but others as well.

    All the belly aching one hears that "THERE ARE NO GOOD SHOERS AROUND!!" does not solve the shortage problem by learning some natural trim course.
         
        03-02-2014, 06:04 AM
      #29
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    Not much a a fan with all this Natural stuff, very little we do with horses is natural...not for the horse anyway.
    Barfoot/Shoeing: Shoeing can be a nessasery evil if we wish the horse too be able to perform.
    I agree fully with your second sentence, although depending how/why it's done, I don't personally think shoeing is necessarily an 'evil' either. But as with everything, we need to weight up the 'cons' as well as the 'pros' of something & as with everything, there are innate cons about conventional shoes, as there are with keeping horses bare/booted.

    But I think people who use the argument 'nothing we do with horses is natural' are taking it too literally. To me, just because something is 'natural' doesn't necessarily make it any better in a given situation than 'artificial' is necessarily bad. But to me, 'natural hoofcare' or 'natural horsemanship' is about understanding & considering what is natural & functional & working with those principles.

    That said, I do agree however, due to so many connotations, lack of understanding, different perspectives, etc, that the very term 'natural' does... grate on me somewhat!

    Quote:
    The Certified Farrier has several months of supervised training and $1000s invested in farrier trade.
    I have seen several cases where the shoer has had to take over the job after some trimmer and found there was one hell of a mess too clean up
    Yep & ditto to a well educated trimmer. But regardless of 'qualifications', whether farrier or 'trimmer', there are still many average ones & I have personally had many more than 'several cases' where I've taken over one hell of a mess from a conventional farrier. Thankfully I do know quite a few good ones too, who have prevented me from suspecting 'all farriers are bad'.

    Quote:
    If people are so keen on working on horses hoofs then they should go to one of the many horse shoeing schools through out the counrty and learn proper trimming and shoeing, that way they would be of service not only to their own horses but others as well.
    I agree wholeheartedly that people should take it seriously & educate themselves well & objectively, even if they don't plan on doing it professionally(even if they don't plan to take over from the farrier/trimmer at all). There's too much at stake for the horse to be gung-ho, or have blind faith in a professional & remain ignorant. But there are different ideas about 'proper trimming & shoeing' & different quality 'horse shoeing schools', as there are hoof care courses.

    As for 'being of service to others', many people, be it because 'there are no good farriers around'(despite many qualified ones, in my personal experience) or otherwise, decided to learn this, out of necessity, to better care for our own horses, not because we planned it as a career. Many people have no interest in doing it as a job. Many people also don't have the opportunity of attending a 'proper' course either & while education & experience is important, esp if you're going to work on other's horses, I don't believe, whether you shoe or not, that lack of any particular 'piece of paper' makes anyone useless, any more than some certificate makes them worthy.
    doubleopi likes this.
         
        03-02-2014, 06:16 AM
      #30
    Super Moderator
    I don't think Rockley is about being natural at all, it is about letting the hoof grow what it needs and providing a suitable environment to do so (be that plenty of work or movement on abrasive surfaces). Given the right domestic environment and movement, hooves can do a lot to create sound horses which had previously failed in all manner of corrective shoeing and professional intervention (many of the horses at Rockely would have been facing the bullet as the next step or permanent lameness). Nothing to do with being natural - it is a rehabbing situation utilising the way hooves grow to create soundness (which sometimes means unsymmetrical hooves to balance issues).
    Oldhorselady likes this.
         

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