Barefoot Performance Horses - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Barefoot Performance Horses

This is a discussion on Barefoot Performance Horses within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

    Like Tree28Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        03-02-2014, 10:39 AM
      #31
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    ...Nor am I a fan of the Do-It-Yourself Trimmers who think they can go to a couple of week-end seminars and think they are qualified not only to start trimming their own horses feet but other peoples horses as well.

    The Certified Farrier has several months of supervised training and $1000s invested in farrier trade...
    I wonder what people did before there were "Certified Farriers". My guess is that most farmers and others did their own work, with 'blacksmiths' doing it in more developed areas. Shoes were used when their feet couldn't grow fast enough to keep up with the wear.

    I'm not a huge fan of ANY business that typically refuses to return calls, or insists on doing work when they feel like it instead of when I need them.
    loosie likes this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        03-02-2014, 10:54 AM
      #32
    Weanling
    I think we humans see a vision of what is "correct" but often that vision is very blurred and we also like "traditions" and basic standards and don't like to thwart from them. We are our biggest chllege when it comes to many things including animal care (ie horses since we are on the topic) and such. I have often wondered why some Farriers are so rigged in thier thinking but that is because thier masters (teachers) probably where also. There was a long yearling that I often looked after that was a little bit crooked on his left front, no big deal and past the point of correction. He wore his toe down more on one side than the other and well that's just because of the mechanical function of that particular leg/ankle that was normal because of the deviation he we born with. The horse was sound, always sound. Well the owner, by listeing to a probably well meaing farrier who didnt like it and had it "corrected". It was something that in my opion did not need correction. The horse later was showing up lame, not three legged lame but was definitely lame. He stayed lame for about a year. His training was put on hold and he was basicaly reduced to a pasture pet. Well circumstances changed and a new Farrier took over the hore's hoof care. This Farrier thought outside the box. I LOVE ppl who think outside the box. (I am one of them). He examined and allowed the diviation to be what it was and trimmed and shod the hoof to allow for more natural carriage (the owner wanted him shod in front.) The owner was at first not to happy about this because of what she had been told by the other Farrier, but she was tired of dealing with a lame horse. (She had two Vets out and had all kinds of work up done on the animal only to find nothing realy wrong except being a bit crooked.) In about 3 Farrier visits the horse was sound. She did agree to allow the horse to go shoeless for the first trimming cycle (to find the natural wear of the hoof due to the crooked ankle) and went from there. Me, myself and I believed this horse would be a good canidate for going shoeless. He had great hooves and though I expressed this thought to the owner she was a die hard "shoe em'" person. So by forcing the horse to conform to what we humans think is correct or perfect the animal suffered and was lame for a long timel. But when someone thought outside the riggid box and began to examine other possibilities and letting go of the "set" standards the animal (and other things outside of the animal kingdom) became right again.
    Those that think and work outside the box achieve a great deal in the realm of knowlege and experience than those that stay within the riggid confines of the box. But that's my opinion.

    Ps. Thinking outside of the confines of set standards and what humans think is correct is not a guarantee that things will work for the better but it sure broadens our perspective and knowlege.
         
        03-02-2014, 11:00 AM
      #33
    Weanling
    OK for crying out loud. One minute I get a "Page Cannot be found" message but when I go to repost I get a double posting. Can a Moderator chuck out one of the double postings? Please and thank you.
         
        03-02-2014, 05:47 PM
      #34
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Clava    
    I don't think Rockley is about being natural at all, it is about letting the hoof grow what it needs and providing a suitable environment to do so (be that plenty of work or movement on abrasive surfaces). Given the right domestic environment and movement, hooves can do a lot to create sound horses which had previously failed in all manner of corrective shoeing and professional intervention
    Begs the question, what does 'natural' mean to you then??
         
        03-03-2014, 02:30 AM
      #35
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    I wonder what people did before there were "Certified Farriers". My guess is that most farmers and others did their own work, with 'blacksmiths' doing it in more developed areas. Shoes were used when their feet couldn't grow fast enough to keep up with the wear.

    I'm not a huge fan of ANY business that typically refuses to return calls, or insists on doing work when they feel like it instead of when I need them.
    In the old days they did what they could when there was no help to be had....but this is not then...this is Now where we have laws that are suppose to protect animals.

    If the farrier is not retruning calls then that is a pretty good indication that he/she does not want that person as a customer.
    Rude on the part of the shoer, curtisy demands that the shoer notify that they are not avalible.
         
        03-03-2014, 04:19 AM
      #36
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Begs the question, what does 'natural' mean to you then??

    Natural is horses existing without intervention. Forced movement under saddle, working on roads and being kept on a surface is no more natural than out in a field, it is a program of conditioning.
         
        03-03-2014, 04:47 AM
      #37
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    In the old days they did what they could when there was no help to be had....but this is not then...this is Now where we have laws that are suppose to protect animals.
    As those laws cannot stipulate that there are always *good* farriers around & available whenever & wherever needed, I think it's a bit irrelevant to the conversation personally.

    Quote:
    Natural is horses existing without intervention.
    OK, you're talking literally. So using that definition, no one anywhere does anything natural with horses & 'natural hoofcare' is an oxymoron. I personally understand it as a concept, not literal.
         
        03-03-2014, 04:53 AM
      #38
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    OK, you're talking literally. So using that definition, no one anywhere does anything natural with horses & 'natural hoofcare' is an oxymoron. I personally understand it as a concept, not literal.
    I actually do not think Rockley would describe their rehab program as "natural", They say...
    Quote:
    Our objective is to improve soundness by allowing each horse to grow the healthiest possible hooves. We use conformable surfaces to keep horses comfortable when they first come out of shoes. Controlled and careful exercise (in hand and ridden) then helps build stronger and better balanced hooves.
         
        03-03-2014, 01:40 PM
      #39
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    ...but this is not then...this is Now where we have laws that are suppose to protect animals...If the farrier is not retruning calls then that is a pretty good indication that he/she does not want that person as a customer...
    Thank goodness there are no laws in Arizona requiring a farrier to visit regularly...because apparently I haven't met any farriers in 6 years who want to trim 3 horses with good feet and good manners.

    As for the thread...it is entirely reasonable for horse owners to look at ways to get healthier hooves for less cost. If adjustments in how the horses are kept or what they are fed or how they are ridden can significantly extend the time between trimmings, and do so with healthier hooves, then that is good horsemanship, not animal cruelty.

    This is one of Mia's hooves at about 10 weeks:



    I don't see any indication that 6 weeks or 8 weeks is a magic number. Our mustang could probably go 4-5 months without attention, although he gets done when the other horses are trimmed. But since farriers prefer to come when it meets THEIR schedule instead of when my horses need a trim, learning to do some work and adjusting their care seems pretty reasonable to me.
    loosie, Clava and greentree like this.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    need help creating a dry lot area for foundered horse sunspot1995 Barn Maintenance 10 06-29-2013 11:13 PM
    Creating a personalized horse first aid kit hellothere Horse Health 2 03-23-2013 12:09 AM
    Creating a bandage for a horse's forearm/elbow area. CopperHorse Horse Health 5 10-09-2011 05:53 PM
    Horse related job: Creating a business plan AQHA Horse Talk 2 09-16-2010 02:48 PM
    Please help me find a new performance horse!!! shermanismybaby3006 Horses for Sale 1 01-28-2009 02:05 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:23 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0