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Are bars load bearing?

This is a discussion on Are bars load bearing? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Weight bearing surface on barefoot horse
  • Show me horse weight bearing area of foot

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    11-21-2011, 10:38 PM
  #11
Weanling
Every part of the foot is "load bearing" depending on the surface the horse is on. Some parts take or give up load as well depending on the surface. The bars should be trimmed but if someone felt there was no need for them, then the horse would have removed them it's self through evolution.
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    11-22-2011, 07:44 AM
  #12
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
So the condition of the bars are the result of the heel height and not the other way around?
The condition of any part of the hoof is a result of / related to the condition of the rest of the hoof. We can't isolate the heels to the bars to the walls to the soles. We must treat it as a whole.
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    11-22-2011, 08:09 AM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Sorry to double post, but this now leads me to a new question. Say you were trying to take the heels down over time (a la my newly barefoot in back horse). If you take down more heel and leave the bars alone, won't the bars now be taking all the load and be subsequently crushed?
Why are you trying to take the heels down over time? I'm guessing your horse has some contraction and you want to undo that by lowering the heels over time. My answer to that is balance the foot where it wants to be today. Trim the heels and bars the best for where the hoof is right now, and let the horse's hoof do the rest.
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    11-22-2011, 04:59 PM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Zimmerman    
Why are you trying to take the heels down over time?
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Because I am rapidly becoming guilty of impatience. Three weeks into my horse's transitions to no shoes on his hinds, I'm trying to figure out why he's still ouchy on some surfaces. I know to let the hoof do what it wants to do, and just follow what it's telling me. It's just easier said than done when you want to have everything okay. I was looking at the heels because his seem higher than many pics of barefoot horses I've been looking at. His hoof otherwise looks great, better than I expected it would. I'm just trying to pinpoint what part is still making him ouchy which is where the bars question came up. His are very prominent. I got the feeling they were touching the ground before everything else and causing a problem. I have a call into a barefoot trimmer. She'll probably come out and tell me it all looks fine and I just have to wait for the sole to toughen a bit more.
     
    11-24-2011, 02:12 AM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
Because I am rapidly becoming guilty of impatience. Three weeks into my horse's transitions to no shoes on his hinds, I'm trying to figure out why he's still ouchy on some surfaces.

Mate, you need to grow a LOT more patience, sorry to say! While some horses can 'transition' very quickly, that's not the norm & it depends on so many factors. Eg. The state of his feet to begin with - they need to be healthy *first* before *beginning* to be able to 'transition' - environment, diet & workload/footing also has a lot to do with whether your horse can become tough bare & how long that may take.

Quote:
I was looking at the heels because his seem higher than many pics of barefoot horses
He's not 'many barefoot horses', he is whatever he is and he may or may not need his heels higher than others.

Quote:
which is where the bars question came up. His are very prominent.
Yeah, they shouldn't be sticking out, but sloping a bit from the heels.

Quote:
I just have to wait for the sole to toughen a bit more.
He may have pretty good feet but have had minor problems, that mean the sole's too thin, heels underdeveloped, whatever, which is what needs to be developed over time. Or his lifestyle & living environment may not be suitable for him to do the work you require him to bare, period.
     
    11-24-2011, 07:05 PM
  #16
Trained
Hee hee. I never said I was a patient person! I know his feet need to do what they need to do. Doesn't make it easier for me to watch him go through it. He finally wanted to trot in the indoor today. He was still aiming for the softer stuff, but looked okay for the most part. I took some new pics. Does anything on these pics scream "put shoes back on" or do they look pretty good? I included a pic from the side view to show the phenomenal growth that has occurred since we pulled the shoes less than 4 weeks ago. Normally he doesn't grow that much in 7 weeks in the summer. The right hind foot also has some ridges on the walls that may show something to the experienced eye. It doesn't tell me squat.

Anyway, here's the pics.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg lefthind-11-24.jpg (34.3 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg sideview-11-24.jpg (30.2 KB, 41 views)
File Type: jpg righthind-11-24.jpg (29.8 KB, 39 views)
     

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