Brighteyes Trims Feet
 
 

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Brighteyes Trims Feet

This is a discussion on Brighteyes Trims Feet within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        05-10-2014, 02:30 PM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Brighteyes Trims Feet

    I made a thread to chart my foot trimming progress with my two horses. I've had a couple lessons from a trimmer, read a few books, and currently own only a rasp and a knife. My farrier hasn't been out to trim in eight weeks, and Baby Girl had such long toes she was off on her right front. This promoted me to attempt my first barefoot trims. Post trim, Baby Girl is no longer lame!

    Anyway, here's today's work. I only did front feet because I got super tired (rasping is a lot of work... Especially Kitty's hoofs, which are hard as rocks.)

    Also, I apologize for the lack of a solar view of BG's left front... Somehow I accidentally deleted it from my phone.

    Please critique! I'm learning and need a lot of help.

    Kitty:

    Left front:


    free image hosting


    post images

    Right Front:


    imagur


    online photo sharing

    Baby Girl:

    Right Front:


    photo host


    free photo hosting

    Left front:


    upload image free
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        05-10-2014, 10:45 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Also, I was told hoof health had a lot to do with work load and diet. So here's some info on that:

    Baby Girl gets two pounds of Legends Performance Pellet, two cups of veggie oil, and six (dry) cups of beet pulp daily. She wears a grazing muzzle 24/7 in an extremely lush pasture. I'm considering adding some Gro Strong minerals and a vitamin E supplement. Baby Girl is currently in light work. She is ridden 3 times a week. Two of those times are mostly at a walk, and the other is a trot/canter/some sprinting conditioning session on the trails. She's a CTR horse, and maintains her fitness quite well this way.

    Miss Kitty gets one cup of beet pulp and two pounds of FRM Cool Balance daily. She is on lush pasture 24/7. She is ridden four/five times a week, with at least two heavy workouts per week. I'm thinking of adding Gro Strong minerals to her diet as well.

    We work on sandy/loomy terrain and in grass arenas. Usually soft, usually wet.

    Baby Girl has been barefoot since the first of the year, and Kitty has been barefoot since October 2013.
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        05-11-2014, 09:36 AM
      #3
    Yearling
    Those are very nice feet. They have big open heels and frogs, and the toes are in decent shape with little to no stretching.

    I do not see sign if any excess dead sole so do not worry about the lack of nippers at this time if you just keep the hoof walls down near the functional (real) sole as You are doing.
    The RF inside heel MIGHT be a little high, hard to tell from that view.

    And Try to learn to lightly dress the flares on the lower 1/3 of the hoof wall at the toes. The flare is subtle but present especially on the RF.
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        05-11-2014, 01:55 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Patty Stiller    
    Those are very nice feet. They have big open heels and frogs, and the toes are in decent shape with little to no stretching.

    I do not see sign if any excess dead sole so do not worry about the lack of nippers at this time if you just keep the hoof walls down near the functional (real) sole as You are doing.
    The RF inside heel MIGHT be a little high, hard to tell from that view.

    And Try to learn to lightly dress the flares on the lower 1/3 of the hoof wall at the toes. The flare is subtle but present especially on the RF.
    Thank you! How would you address this flare? Also, the RF of which horse?
         
        05-11-2014, 05:44 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    The hooves with the most obvious flare are on the last horse, (baby girl?) This is how to blend the flare back so you have a more straight line from he hairline to the ground. Use the FINE side of the rasp for this. Lay the rasp on the wall lower wall. And then raise the top edge VERY SLIGHTLY off the wall. As you rasp, the rasp will naturally start removing material on the lower edge of the wall without whacking it off vertically. As you continue, with the top edge of the rasp barely off the wall, more of the flare wall will be contacted buy the rasp and you will get a nice blended surface.

    STOP when you see a little of the the un-pigmented layer of hoof wall at the bottom edge of the wall. See the attached drawings and photos of a'before and after' flare removal.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg RASP FLARE.JPG (20.3 KB, 132 views)
    File Type: jpg RASP FLARE 2.JPG (27.4 KB, 127 views)
    File Type: jpg Copy of pam king trim 11 before.JPG (18.8 KB, 128 views)
    File Type: jpg pam king trim 5.jpg (49.1 KB, 127 views)
         
        05-11-2014, 08:41 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Oooh, nice pictures/examples! Thank you! I'll work on Baby Girl a little tomorrow or the next day and post from (hopefully improved) pictures. What causes flare, and why are her hoofs flared in the first place? (I've heard a couple book explanations, but I need the "for dummies" version I think!)
         
        05-12-2014, 08:41 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Basically the cause of flares is lack of adequate trimming,
    Anywhere a hoof wall grows beyond the sole it can flare just from getting pushed outward as it loads, and in the case of the toe as the horse moves forward over the long toe. It's like bending your fingernail when the longer they are, the easier they bend. Also, long heels cause flares in the SIDES of a foot, because as the heels run forward the rest of the wall has to go somewhere as it gets pushed forward by the heels and so the sides flare outward (and the toe gets pushed forward more as well) .
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        05-13-2014, 01:17 AM
      #8
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Brighteyes    
    Oooh, nice pictures/examples! Thank you! I'll work on Baby Girl a little tomorrow or the next day and post from (hopefully improved) pictures. What causes flare, and why are her hoofs flared in the first place? (I've heard a couple book explanations, but I need the "for dummies" version I think!)
    I strongly advise you to disregard the rasping procedure as pictured here!
    Weakening the hoof wall that way can cause trauma if struck on a rock or hard surface.
    The hooves as shown are fine.....leave them alone.
    Amigo farrier.
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        05-13-2014, 09:04 AM
      #9
    Green Broke
    Thanks, Amigo!

    Conflicting opinions... Anyone else wanna weight in? I haven't done anything to her hooves yet, and I'm generally of the school that "less is more" when it comes to messing with hooves.
         
        05-14-2014, 01:20 AM
      #10
    Yearling
    I am with Patty on this one. I use that technique on my own horses and client's horses and have not had a horse become injured from trauma. It is an effectice and appropriate way to correct flare.

    Over all I think all of the hoof photos that you have posted look fantastic. There is no critical problems you need to address you just need to maintain what are already good looking feet :)
    MinervaELS likes this.
         

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