Calling all hoof experts. Loosie? Ricci's hoof saga. - Page 11
 
 

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Calling all hoof experts. Loosie? Ricci's hoof saga.

This is a discussion on Calling all hoof experts. Loosie? Ricci's hoof saga. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Deep central sulcus causes pain in heels and buckling
  • Cause of hoof rings

 
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    01-31-2011, 03:47 PM
  #101
Banned
The long and short of it, rings on feet can be caused by any number of things. It does not have to be something catastrophic.
Too wet in turn out. Too dry in turn out. Too much of something or not enough of something, etc.
     
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    01-31-2011, 04:57 PM
  #102
Trained
It's okay, Indy. I don't think I ever actually said what the cause of her colic was.

Always, I understand that, and I'm not really looking for a cause, just stating that the BT did not believe it to be a founder issue.
     
    01-31-2011, 06:26 PM
  #103
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
can tell me...will a horse develop 'rings' from a bad colic?
Yes. Any metabolic upset can potentially cause a laminitic attack, which causes those rings/deviation. Infection, change of diet, pregnancy, stress.... It's generally diet related but not always. Colic is also generally diet related too. But Ricci's feet have rippling - a number of rings, also having been relatively long term probs, as the separation/lamellar 'stretching' is evident at the ground surface too, not just one significant ring that would indicate one particular 'attack'. Therefore I too would assume it's ongoing diet issues not just one event.
     
    01-31-2011, 07:14 PM
  #104
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
The long and short of it, rings on feet can be caused by any number of things. It does not have to be something catastrophic.
Too wet in turn out. Too dry in turn out. Too much of something or not enough of something, etc.
Agree that it can be a range of things, but it is from *internal* factors, not too wet turn out & certainly not too dry, which I don't believe is really possible with animals evolved for semi arid environs.
     
    02-01-2011, 08:36 AM
  #105
Banned
My point on the too wet and too dry is that if the wet (or dry) environment is causing the horse stress it can lead to hoof rings.

Stress leads to eating issues.....

Not being able to walk around easily in deep mud or not being able to walk around easily because the rock hard ground can easily lead to an issue that can cause rings.
     
    02-01-2011, 10:32 PM
  #106
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
My point on the too wet and too dry is that if the wet (or dry) environment is causing the horse stress it can lead to hoof rings.

Stress leads to eating issues.....

Not being able to walk around easily in deep mud or not being able to walk around easily because the rock hard ground can easily lead to an issue that can cause rings.
I get you now & agree that stress can lead to lami, but not so sure about the hard/boggy ground comment - it is more about too much of something, rather than too little, altho if the horse was already IR or on starchy diet & forced to go hungry due to inability to move, that could well do it(don't think that's a likely scenario tho). I'm just not convinced that 'anything' can lead to hoof rings, such as some believe. Sorry to be so nit-picky about specifics!!
     
    03-10-2011, 02:37 PM
  #107
Trained
I had the trimmer out again today. I talked to her about the toe still seeming a bit long and not matching her pastern angle. She said it was to be expected because she is growing a new angle, and that it's going to look ugly until the belled part grows put, which makes sense to me. Does it also make sense to the hoof experts on here?

Also, Ricci has been sound the majority of the six weeks. I have been riding her the last two weeks, the last week consistently. She came up lame two days ago, but it wasn't accompanied by any swelling in her legs, so I don't think the pain has been going on so long as to cause that. The BT said that suggests we are doing something right. She would like to go six weeks again, as she didn't see a lot of growth in general, but if she comes up lame right before she comes out again, we will cut her back to five weeks. Sound reasonable?

And some pictures, just because I'd like to keep this going as at least a photo journal for me.

Front view of left front.


Side, left front.


Sole, left front.


Heel, left front.


Front view, right front.


Heel, right front. Bad angle, sorry. =\


Side, right front.
     
    03-10-2011, 03:41 PM
  #108
Weanling
OP,
Have read through all this and cannot find where hoof testers have been used to determine specific area of pain in the foot. Until you find out exactly what's going on, it will be dificult to treat.

As for flares, new growth follows old. If fares aren't removed completely and foot isn't balanced, then you will always be fighting them.

Rings/ridges in the feet could be from heel pain or sub-clinical/mild laminitis. The fact that they get wider at the heel sugests pain/soreness rather than nutrition.

I would also recommend treating the central sulcus, thrush or not. If very deep, it can lead to caudle hoof pain/sorness.

Asfor last photos, toes need backed up more.
     
    03-10-2011, 03:47 PM
  #109
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    

As for flares, new growth follows old. If fares aren't removed completely and foot isn't balanced, then you will always be fighting them.
Yep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    

Asfor last photos, toes need backed up more.
Yep.
     
    03-10-2011, 08:11 PM
  #110
Trained
Hi,

With only those pics to go on it's hard to really tell how much the toes are bevelled, length of heels, etc. It does appear, from the hooves on the ground pics that they have been bevelled/rolled to relieve some ground pressure, at least on concrete(which unless the horse lives/works on that, doesn't necessarily count for too much), but I too don't think it is not far enough, especially at the toe, to relieve forces that will exacerbate separation & flaring. There is no need for getting rid of the flares entirely from above, but they do need to be addressed with regard to ground surface. If you look at the solar view, there is a fair proportion of foot out in front of the frog apex, indicating a bit of 'stretching'.

Other points I got from the pics are; the front feet look a bit imbalanced, being longer medially. Of course without further info not sure whether this should be just immediately 'corrected' with trimming, whether it's the camera angle, etc... And of the solar shots again, it does appear that little wall thickness has been rolled(I'd probably take it right back to the white line around the toe region) and it looks like the quarters & heels could possibly be lowered a tad more. Also in the lateral pics, it seems that she still has a bit underslung heels, but IME that will likely resolve itself when the toes are backed/bevellled effectively.

I would also trim/treat that crack on the right front toe which looks like it may also be infected.

Quote:
Have read through all this and cannot find where hoof testers have been used to determine specific area of pain in the foot. Until you find out exactly what's going on, it will be dificult to treat.....
Rings/ridges in the feet could be from heel pain or sub-clinical/mild laminitis. The fact that they get wider at the heel sugests pain/soreness rather than nutrition.
BNT, I appreciate that hoof testers can come in handy, but if you're implying that they are at all necessary to know what's going on etc, I disagree. I just don't think they're anywhere near accurate enough to say anything exacting.

Regarding ridges/rings, I agree with most of your above comment, except the bit about wider at the heel suggesting just heel pain rather than lami. Interested to learn why you think this, when it is generally held that heels of laminitics(particularly those with 'rotation') appear to often grow quicker at the heel & have more buckling/tighter rings at the toe. I do agree though, that it's not just laminitics, as horses with heel sensitivity tend to land on their toes, stressing them more & heels less.
     

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