Can this be corrected?
 
 

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Can this be corrected?

This is a discussion on Can this be corrected? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Can a club foot in horse be corrected
  • Correction for high heels in horses

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    01-23-2012, 09:10 PM
  #1
Trained
Can this be corrected?

So, I pulled my horse's front shoes 4 days ago. So far so good thanks to a nice cushy blanket of snow. I'm not sure he knows they're off yet.

Anyway, I took day 1 pics and was surprised to see how off shape his high foot is. The whole foot drifts off the the right. He's a classic high/low. The high is a borderline club.

I've posted the a few pics of how crooked it is. The heel shot shows it the best. I'm wondering if the heel will even out a bit on its own once the heel bulbs spread out, or if my trimmer has to even this out each trim to encourage even growth. Here's the pics.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg right-heel-1-19-12.jpg (35.0 KB, 543 views)
File Type: jpg right-front-1-19-12.jpg (37.7 KB, 271 views)
File Type: jpg r-solar-1-19-12.jpg (43.8 KB, 272 views)
File Type: jpg high-side-1-19-12.jpg (30.6 KB, 270 views)
     
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    01-24-2012, 01:17 AM
  #2
Foal
Looks like there was significant high inside heel going on under the shoe. If you look at the solar shot, you can feel it in the run of the frog. Shoved right over to the outside from the get go. This is a high heel dictating so strongly, that the rest of the hoof is forced to pivot around it. The energy ran from that high heel diagonally and splatted out the outside toe quarter effectively moving his breakover from 10-2 to 12-3. Just like you'd feel if you walked pidgeon-toed. If you look at just the sole area amount around the frog, you'll realize that the whole outside toe quarter is flared in its shape. Its been landing hard on that side

He's got a good trim on there now. I cannot find fault with the balance. He just started transition and the pathology will come off with time, homework and future trims. Keep the patience. Things are corrected and just needs time to settle into it and get his ducks in order. No worries.
     
    01-24-2012, 02:35 AM
  #3
Trained
My farrier successfully trims my horse's hi lo and has actually managed to reduce the under-running of the low heel, all with shoes on.

The most important thing I've found with treating hi lo, beyond radiographs and a good farrier, is frequent trimmings. My horse is trimmed and reset every 4-5 weeks. My farrier jokes how he would love to be out there every week to keep the horse balanced haha. Another important thing to consider with a hi lo horse is the alignment of the joints above the hoof. The left and right knee should be at the same height!! Working a horse with such an imbalance can cause a plethora of issues.

Good luck!!
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    01-24-2012, 02:41 AM
  #4
Banned
Anebel said it all, took the words out of my mouth. :)
     
    01-24-2012, 04:50 PM
  #5
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by missyclare    
Looks like there was significant high inside heel going on under the shoe. If you look at the solar shot, you can feel it in the run of the frog. Shoved right over to the outside from the get go. This is a high heel dictating so strongly, that the rest of the hoof is forced to pivot around it. The energy ran from that high heel diagonally and splatted out the outside toe quarter effectively moving his breakover from 10-2 to 12-3. Just like you'd feel if you walked pidgeon-toed. If you look at just the sole area amount around the frog, you'll realize that the whole outside toe quarter is flared in its shape. Its been landing hard on that side

He's got a good trim on there now. I cannot find fault with the balance. He just started transition and the pathology will come off with time, homework and future trims. Keep the patience. Things are corrected and just needs time to settle into it and get his ducks in order. No worries.
Thanks! That's good to know it can be corrected. I had a feeling something was getting out of whack when he started having trouble doing lateral work on one side. I walked him on pavement today and saw the first signs of him starting to land heel first. I also caught him using it a few times as the grazing foot. So far no soreness.
     
    01-24-2012, 06:11 PM
  #6
Trained
Hi,

Doesn't look too bad to me. I'd just be conscious to address the flares & trim the 'up' foot where it needs to be, not to match the other(not saying that's what's been done) While it's a bit hard to tell, it appears there is a fair bit of toe that could be bevelled from the up foot. Ditto to frequent trimming being best - 3-5 weekly is good I reckon.
     
    01-24-2012, 06:32 PM
  #7
Trained
The trimmer said the toe on his high foot is all the way back to the white line, so she's actually hoping it grows out some. I was surprised to see the side show resembling excess toe. Funny what you notice when you take pics. My trimmer is being cautious about bringing the high heel down. We're trying to do as little as possible and still be effective each trim. I'm working the muscles on that leg so they can stretch out as his high heel is lowered.

So it's more an issue of addressing the flare on the outside rather than the high wall on the inside?
     
    01-24-2012, 11:05 PM
  #8
Trained
I'd be keeping a bevel on the walls from approx where I've drawn on your pic. I couldn't say for sure, but it does appear there is a little stretched toe. Often people mistake the epidermal laminae for the actual 'white line'.

Re lowering high/clubbed feet, depending on the cause of the high foot, it may not be able to come down, so I don't generally think it's a good move to try to force the issue. None of us are perfectly symmetrical. I think respecting the sole plane is very important with this - never rasp/pare into it. But if it needs to and you just keep the foot frequently well trimmed, that sole plane may start to recede, leaving more 'excess' wall at the heels.

Re medial/lateral balance, can't tell. If the inside wall is higher, again I think respecting the sole plane again is the way to go, keeping the inside wall at/near level with the sole but never paring into it. I think that is a way to facilitate better balance over time without trying to force it.
     
    01-24-2012, 11:14 PM
  #9
Trained
I think part of the problem with the toes on both feet is that extra layer of hard stuff grew there over the past few weeks. We can't see the white line, water line or hoof wall for that matter. It's starting the crumble and fall off now that he's shoeless, so hopefully I'll soon be able to see where exactly that line is.

It's funny. In person it looks like that club foot is practically straight up and down. In the side view pic, it looks like a long toe!

Thanks for your sticky on picture taking. I'm getting better.
     
    01-25-2012, 01:38 AM
  #10
Trained
Oh, didn't attach pic...

BTW, if you mean the signature link for pics, that's not my page, just a site I thought was helpful re pics.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg r-solar-1-19-12.jpg (62.2 KB, 183 views)
     

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