Can a farrier cause a horrse to become thin-soled? - Page 3
   

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Can a farrier cause a horrse to become thin-soled?

This is a discussion on Can a farrier cause a horrse to become thin-soled? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Overlaid bars hoof
  • Can i let my laminatic pony out at

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    10-12-2013, 02:51 AM
  #21
Started
Loosie, all we need do is ask wiki! Info here on horses walking on one finger per leg in front, one toe per leg in back, & on the nails/walls:

Why do horse walk on their middle finger
     
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    10-12-2013, 08:17 PM
  #22
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
Where did gottatrot go? Had some good stuff on the bars pushing up into the capsule & how to fix that.

You can still give that information id like to know think one of my horses has that problem. Can over grown bars cause abcess issues? Also have that problem right now with one of my horses. Its not my laminatic horse either he's fine.

Does a super wet environment also cause for abcesses? Its done nothing but rain for over a month now.
     
    10-12-2013, 10:05 PM
  #23
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern    
Loosie, all we need do is ask wiki!
Haha!

Quote:
Can over grown bars cause abcess issues? ...Does a super wet environment also cause for abcesses?
Yes & yes.
     
    10-13-2013, 03:04 PM
  #24
Started
Spirit88, I meant that gottatrot gave that info: look up his/her posts & find it. Good pics, too!
     
    10-13-2013, 11:57 PM
  #25
Green Broke
I think everything works together on the hoof. The hoof wall, sole, and frog all offer protection to P3. They all bear weight. The sole is thick, ideally, and callouses, but flexes in movement and allows the hoof to expand and contract with each step. The hoof wall and bars limit how much the sole expands, sometimes too much. The bars are an extension of the hoof wall. Overlaid bars can jam up into the hoof capsule and cause pain. Exfoliating sole can thicken and layer and jam into the hoof capsule, causing pain. The only time I would touch the sole, the only thing protecting P3 from the ground, would be to remove exfoliating sole that has toughened up. But I would rather the owner let the horse stand out in the wet/muddy paddock and let nature choose how much to take off instead of a horse owner stalling their horse every time it sprinkles.

I do think frogs should maintain contact with the ground. Healthy frogs are very large and cover a lot of sole area. They're extremely tough but they give under stress a lot easier than sole. That is why the frog does such a great job of cushioning and protecting P3. Natural concavity indicates that P3 is in a healthy and safe position in the hoof capsule. A concave foot, where the sole hugs P3, does a lot better job of protecting P3 than a flat sole. There's a lot more room for error.

Basically, all parts of the hoof work together. No one part has just one job. That's not how the hoof was built, or how it works. I've still got a lot to learn, but I don't think even the best farriers will ever understand exactly how the hoof does what it does. It just does.
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    10-14-2013, 08:19 PM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayella    
... Overlaid bars can jam up into the hoof capsule and cause pain. Exfoliating sole can thicken and layer and jam into the hoof capsule, causing pain. The only time I would touch the sole, the only thing protecting P3 from the ground, would be to remove exfoliating sole that has toughened up.... Yes, this is Lee's point: soles can toughen & jam the capsule.
Natural concavity indicates that P3 is in a healthy and safe position in the hoof capsule. A concave foot, where the sole hugs P3, does a lot better job of protecting P3 than a flat sole. There's a lot more room for error. This is such a good point! Plus, in my reading, I've read that if left alone, the sole will go concave on its own, to hug a nice, high P3.

Basically, all parts of the hoof work together. No one part has just one job. That's not how the hoof was built, or how it works. I've still got a lot to learn, but I don't think even the best farriers will ever understand exactly how the hoof does what it does. It just does.
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thanks for your important points!
     
    10-14-2013, 09:29 PM
  #27
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayella    
I think everything works together on the hoof. The hoof wall, sole, and frog all offer protection to P3. They all bear weight.
Agreed. But I don't believe the walls are a *primarily* weightbearing structure, but they're mostly for protecting the rest of the hoof, from kicking rocks, etc. I think 'jammed quarters' etc are evidence of this.

Quote:
They're extremely tough but they give under stress a lot easier than sole. That is why the frog does such a great job of cushioning and protecting P3. Natural concavity indicates that P3 is in a healthy and safe position in the hoof capsule. A concave foot, where the sole hugs P3, does a lot better job of protecting P3 than a flat sole.
The frog is mostly behind P3, especially the 'fitter' the foot - healthy, well functioning heels are big - and what's above the frog - the digital cushion, etc, should be the primary weightbearing structure, IMO.

I agree *generally* that some concavity is desirable & that flat soles generally go with thin, flared feet, but the presence or absence of concavity doesn't *necessarily* mean anything good or bad - you can have extra thin, nicely (naturally) concaved hooves, & you can have thick, strong, flat soles. I think it mainly depends on environment as to what's the most ideal in any given situation/horse, and *support* under P3 counts for just as much as protection - lack of support tends to lead to thinner, less protected hooves too.

Eg. Hooves that only ever work on pavement should have their sole more 'filled in' & flat, as otherwise they'd have too little support underneath to spread the load. Horses who work on yielding ground however, can afford to have more concavity & longer walls, as the ground still allows distal support & reduces/stops the walls being peripherally loaded.
Kayella likes this.
     
    10-14-2013, 09:45 PM
  #28
Green Broke
I don't think the hoof wall serves primarily as weight-bearing, either, but shares some of the load.

The environment playing a factor in concavity definitely makes sense and is so interesting! My boy has low heels but a large frog and digital cushion. His fores have a slight concavity while his hinds have more concavity. My pony has very upright feet with high heels and his feet are nearly flat. Yet they share the same paddock so traverse the same terrain. Their feet are nothing alike yet they're in the same environment. Definitely interesting. :)
     
    10-15-2013, 04:32 PM
  #29
Started
If wall isn't supposed to carry most of weight, as opposed to sole, why is it that in the old days when some horses' jobs were to walk/trot cobblestone streets, they were shod (so no sole ever touched ground) & worked for decades without a problem? (Not said combatively, just asking.) This is an example that Lee gave on his site.

Although I must add that Lee says that the breed of horse/natural action resulting thereof plays an important part in what works for the hooves: the Kladrubers in his picture kept breakover minimal by their natural high action.
     
    10-15-2013, 05:01 PM
  #30
Showing
Can over grown bars cause abcess issues? ...Does a super wet environment also cause for abcesses?
So can a horse continually stamping at flies in a dry environment. One miniscule crack can allow bacteria to invade.
     

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