Care/Boots for the Barefoot Horse?
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Care/Boots for the Barefoot Horse?

This is a discussion on Care/Boots for the Barefoot Horse? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • How to rasp horse hoofs before putting on boots
  • What is the hoof boot for the money

Like Tree9Likes
  • 8 Post By natisha
  • 1 Post By walkinthewalk

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-06-2013, 10:11 AM
  #1
Started
Care/Boots for the Barefoot Horse?

I have been riding an OTTB owned by my barn manager's sister, and have been focused on retraining him. He is barefoot, and was just about due for a trim when I started riding him (about mid may). They said that the farrier was going to be coming out later in the week and that since he often gets sore when ridden they would be putting front shoes on him. Well, that farrier ended up not being able to come out, then there was some trouble getting a hold of the other one, and it ended up being yesterday before someone finally showed up. I assumed that they had all been done, and I offered to pay the difference for the front shoes on Indy (the OTTB) but then I saw that he hadn't even been trimmed Turns out that his owner didn't want to/couldn't afford to spend the money having her horses trimmed, so she wants to do it herself. In her words, "anyone can trim a horse". I don't think she has any real experience at all with trimming, so I am going to pay for his trimming this time and I'll see how her mare's trim turns out. Ugh!

Anyway, the short story behind all of that is that he's not getting shoes anytime soon. I was willing to spend the difference for the shoes since I'd be the one riding him, but I can't justify doubling that price just because she doesn't want to pay for the farrier at all. I was told that he will get sore when being worked without shoes, but he seems to be ok for now. His stride seems short, but I don't know if that is because he's tenderfooted, unbalanced, or just doesn't have particularly great movement, but he has not been lame. However, I don't know how long that will last with regular riding that will increase in intensity. I would also like to ultimately be able to ride him on the road out back and on the levee, and I don't want the gravel he would encounter to wear his feet down to nothing. Should I consider investing in a pair of boots for him to use on gravelly days, or if he becomes sore with increasing work? If so, what would you recommend?

Also, what other ideas do you have as far as maintaining/improving the quality of his feet? It was recommended to me to buy some venice turpentine to apply to his soles, so I got some of that. I am trying to stay under the price of adding shoes, so I am looking for ideas that aren't really expensive in combination! For example, boots may have a fair bit of expense upfront, but are a one time purchase. The turpentine is not too pricey, but a hoof supplement would be a fairly high monthly cost!

I'm open to any ideas! I want to keep him comfortable and in good shape, but don't want to break the bank for someone else's horse!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-06-2013, 10:34 AM
  #2
Weanling
The tricky thing about boots is you really have to keep up on the trims. It sounds like renegades have a little more "wiggle room" if you will but you will still have to be trimming every 4 weeks or more. With some easy boot models you may have to rasp the feet every couple of days to get a good fit. Don't get me wrong, I think boots are great, I'm getting a pair for my OTTB. Just a lot of upkeep to keep them fitting right.

I've never been a fan of applying chemicals to the bottoms of hooves but I'm sure someone on here will have more experience with that and be able to help you more. No matter what you decide to do the horse will still need regular trims.
     
    06-06-2013, 11:05 AM
  #3
Green Broke
If you are getting paid to retrain him it is up to the owner to make sure he is ready to work. Even if you're not getting paid it is not for you to put money into someone else's horse.
I feel they are taking advantage of you & your concern for the horse. If & when he does come up sore for lack of good foot care chances are they will be quick to blame you.
I would tell them, no farrier = no training.
     
    06-06-2013, 11:47 AM
  #4
Green Broke
^^what Natisha said.
     
    06-06-2013, 09:50 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldComic    
The tricky thing about boots is you really have to keep up on the trims. It sounds like renegades have a little more "wiggle room" if you will but you will still have to be trimming every 4 weeks or more. With some easy boot models you may have to rasp the feet every couple of days to get a good fit. Don't get me wrong, I think boots are great, I'm getting a pair for my OTTB. Just a lot of upkeep to keep them fitting right.

I've never been a fan of applying chemicals to the bottoms of hooves but I'm sure someone on here will have more experience with that and be able to help you more. No matter what you decide to do the horse will still need regular trims.
I didn't think about the fit changing with the different stages of feet. I definitely wouldn't keep the boots on him all of the time- just when riding. I do know that the horse will still need regular trims regardless of what happens.

I'm not getting paid to ride/train this horse. It was kind of a "you can ride him if you want to" thing, but I can't really just get on and ride him how I want without putting basic training on him. Even if they knew I wouldn't ride without professional trims they would just say Ok and do what they were going to do anyway. These are the type of folks who are ok with their horses just laying idle, but are fine with someone with a moderate amount of experience riding their horses.

Basically what I mean is that if she trims the horse herself (he WILL get trimmed one way or another, but the farrier isn't happening until at least next trim) he will probably go lame and I will be out a horse. I very much enjoy working with the guy and would be interested in buying him if I had the money for an extra horse, but that's not in the cards right now. If I do one day try to buy him it would only be if I can keep him there for less than the price of regular board, so that would even out. I also don't like the idea of paying for someone else's horse on principle, but it's either keep his feet in riding shape, or don't ride him.

I know that I sound like I'm trying to justify paying for the trim, and I guess in a way I am. The farrier is just not happening this month though without my help, and I would like to continue riding him without lameness issues.
     
    06-07-2013, 05:54 PM
  #6
Weanling
IMO if your are bound and determined to continue you could find a farrier to get out there, pay for the trim, try to find some used boots and ride. Otherwise it sounds like the owner might need to learn a lesson at their horses expense. How bad are the feet? If you don't ride will he be okay until the next trim? Horses can get some pretty bad feet without going lame if you don't ride. Is it fair? No. But neither is making you pay for the trims. You are teaching these people that if they don't take care of it someone will for them. Not okay in my book. You might just have to go without riding this horse. Like I said JMO.
     
    06-15-2013, 01:17 AM
  #7
Started
So he finally got trimmed, and was sore as a result. I've been putting venice turpentine on his feet, but I spoke to the barn manager (his owner's sister) about the possibility of putting front shoes on him. As much as I like this horse I don't think that I'll be able to do anything with him unless he has something on his front feet. I'd have to pay the difference between the cost of front shoes vs a trim though, since it does not makes sense for his owner to put shoes on him that he wouldn't need if I didn't want to ride him. I completely see where y'all are coming from about her paying to provide basic hoof care for her own horse, but the shoes are only needed because I want to work with him. If she's not willing to pay the base price for the trim however often it's needed though, then things probably just won't work out for more than just playing around with him

I'm still considering the boot option, but I'd have to be the one rasping them down to keep the fit correct. I like the idea of boots more than shoes, but I don't know how comfortable I'd be doing that. If I do decide to go that route, what brand of boot would you recommend? Should he be booted on all four feet, or just the front?
     
    06-15-2013, 02:19 AM
  #8
Trained
I agree with Natasha, but I am curios - what is the turpentine on his soles suppose to achieve?

I ride with fronts only over very rocky terrain. It is up to you. Easyboots have many "types" - which ones would be best for you depends on for what use and his foot "shape", so only you could be the judge of which are best suited for your needs/horse in that particular brand. I like the brand and can attest to their "durability".
     
    06-15-2013, 10:01 AM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
I agree with Natasha, but I am curios - what is the turpentine on his soles suppose to achieve?

I ride with fronts only over very rocky terrain. It is up to you. Easyboots have many "types" - which ones would be best for you depends on for what use and his foot "shape", so only you could be the judge of which are best suited for your needs/horse in that particular brand. I like the brand and can attest to their "durability".
The turpentine is supposed to help harden the soles to make him less ouchy over hard ground, and hopefully keep them from wearing down as quickly. It's been recommended to me by the farrier and a few other folks/internet sources. I'm also not big on applying things where they aren't needed, but I would definitely like to avoid having to put shoes on as well.

Thanks for the brand recommendation- I may look into it if I decide to go the boot route. I'll give him some time to grow out, think about it, and talk to his owner in the meantime!

Oh, and another question. Like normal horse shoes and human shoes, will hoof boots eventually wear out? It makes sense that they would, but how long does that usually take? I understand that it may vary between horses, but with average riding over normal terrain and the occasional rocks, how often would they need to be replaced?
     
    06-15-2013, 11:04 AM
  #10
Trained
Yes, they wear out. It is probably best to zero in on the exact copy you want and then see what users say about their durability vs the manufacture's claim. Usually the manufacture states what they are designed for - e.g., easyboot trails state they are for just 25 miles a week, and their price reflects it. I have a lot of pairs of old macs which have amazing durability, but so not worth the hassle of putting them on. I had a gelding that slightly paddled out in his right front above a walk. Over time the right shoe wore more on one side which I assumed was a result of that. So, terrain will obviously factor into wear, but so can their actual movement. Personally, I like the lower priced "lower miles" shoes, b/c then I get to shop for new ones faster...and they seem to always be coming out w some "new" design.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Care of Barefoot saddle SleipnirCB Horse Tack and Equipment 0 04-27-2013 03:50 PM
Good barefoot hoof care/trimming e-books? AnnaHalford Hoof Care 5 08-28-2012 10:07 PM
Looking into boots to transition to barefoot*opinions* itsapleasure Hoof Care 11 07-21-2012 08:20 PM
Shoes,boots or barefoot Diegosmom Trail Riding 24 05-03-2012 10:27 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0