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clips to help a cracked hoof

This is a discussion on clips to help a cracked hoof within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Hoof anatomy cracks

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    04-20-2013, 09:59 PM
  #41
Weanling
Loosie, Thanks for the info. When I get home I'll start soaking his foot (prob both his fronts actually). I've also read today that Apple Cider Vinegar 50:50 with water works well. Have you tried or do you have anything to add to that suggestion. I do use ACV at home with my chickens and my dogs.

Also thanks for the info on finding second hand boots. I had no idea!

Has anyone had any success with general hoof supplements? Like stuff from smartpak? I don't like supplementing unless it's for a reason but biotin seems popular for coat and hoof but does it really work?
     
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    04-21-2013, 02:03 AM
  #42
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by krazygirl    
6 months 2 months and yesterday.... Just 1 foot. So now after 3 pictures does it not look better?
They look like the same pics you've already posted(??), so no, they don't give me a different picture. Of course the crack appears to be finally growing out somewhat(has it taken 8 months to get that far??) But it's the whole foot pictured that I'm concerned about. The long, run forward heel, the bullnose toe, the added stress on the wall behind the crack, etc. But anyway, I say no more, unless you would like to start a thread about it. Was just pointing out that I agree with Spirit, this is far from a good eg, but that there's little to go on too, to judge the farrier much.
     
    04-21-2013, 02:34 AM
  #43
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldComic    
Apple Cider Vinegar 50:50 with water works well.
ACV works sometimes because fungal infections don't tend to like acid. If it's something that doesn't mind acid, or a deep, closed infection where it can't get in, it won't help. I tend to use ACV on minor seedy or thrush, or as a preventative measure in less than ideal environment, but I'd go something broader spectrum in a case such as this.

Quote:
Has anyone had any success with general hoof supplements? Like stuff from smartpak? I don't like supplementing unless it's for a reason but biotin seems popular for coat and hoof but does it really work?
I do think diet & nutrition are vital components of healthy horses(including hooves of course). As pointed out, I suspect the 'symptoms' are also diet/nutrition related, so yes, if you don't already supp the horse to ensure balanced nutrition, that will probably be a good move. The thing is, adding particular nutrients 'willy nilly' can be an unhelpful waste of money. So in order to choose the *right* supps the first thing is to evaluate his current diet so you can see what's missing. Including a pasture/hay analysis will give you a far more accurate idea, but failing that, your vet or others in your area may be able to tell you more about the soil/pasture types for a reasonable idea. I find FeedXL.com to be a really helpful program/service for working out nutritional balance & what products will fit your particular horse's 'bill'. Not to mention having qualified nutritionists to learn from, ask questions of, etc.

Smartpak does seem to be one of the better pelleted type supps available(important to me because very low dose pelleted good for my fatties who don't get other hard feed), but Smartpak isn't available over here, so I haven't used it. Biotin is one vitamin that has been studied & found to help hooves grow faster, apparently even if fed in excess of 'balanced' guidelines. It is readily available in green feed, so if your horse has adequate grazing or is fed some alfalfa or such it probably won't be actually deficient in his diet though. Mg is one that more research has suggested the 'accepted' ratios may leave horses(& people) quite deficient & oversupplied in calcium. It is also affected by stress - be that physical or mental - and high carb diets. **I'm no nutritionist & don't take my word for it, but well worth looking into IMO.
aforred likes this.
     
    04-24-2013, 02:04 PM
  #44
Started
I agree with loosie. There are many nutritional factors that go into hoof health, and you need to know what he's already getting.

Biotin is good for speeding hoof growth, but not for improving hoof quality.

One very important factor is making sure he gets enough of the essential amino acids. (Essential just means that they have to be supplied by the diet.)

Magnesium is important for the body's ability to use amino acids to create the various proteins needed--like keratin in hooves and hair.

Zinc is another important mineral for hooves.

Sulfur binds the keratin in the hoof. (IF he's deficient, it can be supplemented with MSM, which is fairly cheap.)

Fatty acids are essential to hoof health.

**Most of this information comes from Melyni Worth's The Horse Nutrition Handbook. If you want more information on feeding for hoof health, search the hoof health and horse nutrition forums.

As loosie pointed out, feedXL is an excellent resource for formulating a diet. I was leery at first, but it has paid for itself and my horses are much healthier now.
loosie likes this.
     
    04-24-2013, 02:24 PM
  #45
Weanling
I took a look at the feedXL website. I think I'm sold on it. However, I have to wait until our pastures come up a bit. They are just now starting to get a little green. It's been a long cold spring here.

I'm hoping I can improve his hooves. I'm a little worried that I may not be able too since they did work so hard on them when he was on the track. My Grandfather did not run horses lame and was very picky about their care so I'm pretty sure there was a lot done to try to help his feet. However, I will find out and do what I can and we'll see where we end up.

This thread has helped me a lot and given me a lot of insight. I'll post update photos of his hooves and pics of the bottoms as well the first of next week (I'm out of town til then).
     
    04-24-2013, 02:31 PM
  #46
Banned
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by krazygirl    
You are seeing one foot that was abscessed and cracked. The improvement in her foot over the last two months was all I needed to see. She isn't shod. He created that shoe to push her hoof together so it would start to grow out. The shoe did what it was intended to do. Who cares what the shoe looks like. We tried different options before and they did not work.
Seeing the improvement finally, yes I am happy with his work. Considering what we were dealing with he did an excellent job.
Its easy for your to sit in your seat and be judgmental. You didn't see the good feet. You didn't see her pain and try to work around it. And you sure didn't offer to come help me get her hoof fixed. She was 9 months pregnant. Dealing with the extra weight she was carrying was not helping. And every time he tried to put a nail in, it was hurting her. But we could not leave it as it was.

Iv delt with my fare share of what I thought were great farriers. Then I joined horse forums and have learned diffrent. Take time to learn about what a propper trim and shoe job looks like. I have and have now been through 6 farriers not one was good.


My horse still has issues that every One iv used has failed to see. Its up to you to become a educated horse owner on hoofs.
     
    04-24-2013, 04:57 PM
  #47
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by spirit88    
Iv delt with my fare share of what I thought were great farriers. Then I joined horse forums and have learned diffrent. Take time to learn about what a propper trim and shoe job looks like. I have and have now been through 6 farriers not one was good.


My horse still has issues that every One iv used has failed to see. Its up to you to become a educated horse owner on hoofs.
I agree it's hard to find a good farrier. This is why I'm taking a class on hoof anatomy, trimming, and how to handle cracks, abscess, and crooked legs. I'd like to get Comic to where we can use boots and I can do the trimming.

@krazygirl: Maybe look for a class through a local college or even a local farrier school to learn more about proper hoof balance. If you want to try to learn more that is. I know less than most everyone on this forum but I'm learning and really appreciating everyones opinion (weather I agree with it or not ).

So my farrier backed out on me last minute (saying his wife's Grandpa died. Maybe he did... maybe he didn't). I was less than happy but he said he'd be out this weekend. If he blows me off again I'll have someone come pull the shoes and have my dad trim him for me (he doesn't shoe) until I learn how (hopefully only a couple of months). I like the idea of doing it myself, it'll be easier to keep up on (every 2 weeks and I'll mostly just be using a rasp I bet) and keep an eye on his feet and their condition.
loosie, aforred, spirit88 and 1 others like this.
     
    04-24-2013, 06:45 PM
  #48
Banned
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldComic    
I agree it's hard to find a good farrier. This is why I'm taking a class on hoof anatomy, trimming, and how to handle cracks, abscess, and crooked legs. I'd like to get Comic to where we can use boots and I can do the trimming.

@krazygirl: Maybe look for a class through a local college or even a local farrier school to learn more about proper hoof balance. If you want to try to learn more that is. I know less than most everyone on this forum but I'm learning and really appreciating everyones opinion (weather I agree with it or not ).

So my farrier backed out on me last minute (saying his wife's Grandpa died. Maybe he did... maybe he didn't). I was less than happy but he said he'd be out this weekend. If he blows me off again I'll have someone come pull the shoes and have my dad trim him for me (he doesn't shoe) until I learn how (hopefully only a couple of months). I like the idea of doing it myself, it'll be easier to keep up on (every 2 weeks and I'll mostly just be using a rasp I bet) and keep an eye on his feet and their condition.

Good for you boldcomic that's kinda were iam at learning to trim my own I havent fired current farrier. He's only done my horses once so gotta give him a chance. But I see now he's not seeing issue he should so will probley be next one to be fired. I have only one more farrier to try then iam outta luck if he's not good. Iv used every farrier in my area.

I used to not want to hear that the farrier I was using wasnt doing my horses feet good. Have a freind who was telling me their feet didnt look good they have under run heels. Iv been blowing her off for over a year up until now I just couldnt see it. I was in the mind set oh my farrier is AFA certified so he must be good.

All I can say now is that certification ment nothing my horses hoofs are proof of that. Its been a tough road to go down wish I would of listened to my freind but no I was to stupid!!


The best thing iv done is join this forum I spend sometimes hours reading everything on hoofs. So iam not that uneducated owner that I was before now. I have a real hard time firing farriers don't like doing it but my horses soundness is at stake.
     
    04-24-2013, 08:08 PM
  #49
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoldComic    
I'm hoping I can improve his hooves. I'm a little worried that I may not be able too since they did work so hard on them when he was on the track. My Grandfather did not run horses lame and was very picky about their care so I'm pretty sure there was a lot done to try to help his feet. However, I will find out and do what I can and we'll see where we end up.
As we've discussed, diet and nutrition play a huge role. Racehorses & other 'high performance' & intensively kept horses tend to be fed high starch, high octane diets, too little forage and large, infrequent meals.

On top of that, stress, be it physical or mental, affects hooves, can cause laminitis, depletes Mg & other nutrients.... Then you've got the further physical strain of actually racing, and constant shoeing without regular breaks(especially problematic when applied to young, immature hooves)...

So all in all, even if the particular attention to his hooves was AAA grade, there are so many other considerations & systemically & environmentally, everything else may have been too much against him for the hoofcare to achieve anything. Therefore, don't give up - it's highly likely that with good management, you can at least greatly improve his hoof health.
     
    04-25-2013, 10:26 PM
  #50
Weanling
Farrier update: I'm really bummed. I've tried calling and texting this kid and have gotten no response. At this point I'm done with him. What bugs me the most is when I first met him he told me one of the big reasons he became a farrier is because he was sick of farriers not showing up, being unreliable, putting him off for weeks, and not caring about his concerns. Then he turns around and does exactly that. It just makes me kind of sad. He seemed like a genuine guy and was just starting out. I was hoping he would come out and make this right. I even told him if I liked his work I wanted to book out all 10 of our horses (some shoes some trims) for the whole year.

I talked to my FIL, he is going to pull the front shoes this weekend and help me trim them to get rid of the flare. I'll keep up on them with a rasp to keep pressure off the crack and hopefully through diet and learning more in this class in June we can move to boots then maybe barefoot some day.
     

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