Corns and dry frogs.
 
 

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Corns and dry frogs.

This is a discussion on Corns and dry frogs. within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Soft corn issues with barefoot horse
  • Dry flat horse hoof desert terrain

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  • 1 Post By Missy May

 
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    10-03-2012, 04:13 AM
  #1
Foal
Corns and dry frogs.

Hi guys!
So recently I've discovered my horse has a corn. He's not limping badly on it, but is noticeably sore on it when he is on hard ground. Its been caused (from what I believe) by him outgrowing his shoe (He is shod every five-six weeks, talking to my farrier about how this has happened tomorrow).
I'm trying to find a way of helping it heal, as quickly as possible.
Has anyone found anything that is helpful?
He has been reshod since, but i'm convinced he seems a worse (slightly) so I'm thinking of removing the shoe?

Also does anyone put hoof oil on the frog? He's got quite dry frogs, and I've been told to put hoof oil on the frog, but worried about it rotting!

Abundance of questions! Sorry!

:)
     
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    10-03-2012, 11:37 AM
  #2
Trained
I can't answer about the corn, I am sure someone else w experience in that department will come along soon, though.

As to the frogs...do you live in a dry climate? All my horses' frogs have always been hard and dry when in the desert, which is expected and is normal. So long as they are clean, they are fine, no "oiling" is necessary. On occasion they will get a little flap here or there that hardens in place and traps dirt which I just cut off to keep the dirt out. If it is not a dry climate, then I still don't think oil is in order - but if and how his frogs make contact w the ground might need to be examined.
     
    10-04-2012, 01:06 AM
  #3
Trained
Corns are from constant, unremitting pressure on the sole from the shoes. Never seen the problem on a barefoot horse. Dry, hard frogs are good! You don't want them soft & damp at all(tho so many of us have that problem because of environment)! No, topical hoof goops & oils aren't good & yes, you are right to worry about infection if you seal them up, as most thrushy bugs are anaerobic.
     
    10-04-2012, 04:27 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
I can't answer about the corn, I am sure someone else w experience in that department will come along soon, though.

As to the frogs...do you live in a dry climate? All my horses' frogs have always been hard and dry when in the desert, which is expected and is normal. So long as they are clean, they are fine, no "oiling" is necessary. On occasion they will get a little flap here or there that hardens in place and traps dirt which I just cut off to keep the dirt out. If it is not a dry climate, then I still don't think oil is in order - but if and how his frogs make contact w the ground might need to be examined.
I live in New Zealand, so its not exactly dry ;) can be very wet. My trainer commented on them and how I should be putting oil on his frogs also. He's fully shod (I'd prefer to have him barefoot, not because of costs, more for how its healthier for the hoof, he's very tender unshod however)
Do you live in a desert?
     
    10-04-2012, 04:36 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Corns are from constant, unremitting pressure on the sole from the shoes. Never seen the problem on a barefoot horse. Dry, hard frogs are good! You don't want them soft & damp at all(tho so many of us have that problem because of environment)! No, topical hoof goops & oils aren't good & yes, you are right to worry about infection if you seal them up, as most thrushy bugs are anaerobic.

We took the shoe off this morning, and soaked his hoof in epsom salts and warm water. Will do the same tomorrow. There is slight brusing beside his bar. But he seems to be limping a bit too much for it to be caused just by a bruise, then again it seems like a coincidence as he hasn't been lame for the last three years.

I'll give you guys an update on how it goes tomorrow. I'm hoping that by removing the shoes its allowing things to heal faster, and its removed any pressure causing it to get worse.
I really hope its not anything more sinister, I'll be getting my farrier and vet to have a look if it doesn't improve at all in the next few days.
Thanks for replying :)
     
    10-04-2012, 11:59 AM
  #6
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canteringleap    
I live in New Zealand, so its not exactly dry ;) can be very wet. My trainer commented on them and how I should be putting oil on his frogs also. He's fully shod (I'd prefer to have him barefoot, not because of costs, more for how its healthier for the hoof, he's very tender unshod however)
Do you live in a desert?
Oh, well lucky you (live in NZ) - what a beautiful country. Yes, I do (live in the desert). But, on the occasions I have had my horses in wet areas their frogs got more "pliable" and hydrated looking...for lack of a better description.

I went from shoes to boots many moons ago. I think it is far better. As I have posted before, once when I moved my horses from sandy terrain to rocky terrain my then mare got ouchy. I put old macs on her 24/7 (kept them clean) and graduated her onto the hard terrain. It worked great. Many people say not to do this, but I believe the only concern is cleanliness and rubbing. Anyway...its just a thought to help your guy "transition".

Loosie is quite knowledgable, so the advice is no doubt good.

I hope it is just something little, too. I would love to hear a "follow up".
loosie likes this.
     
    10-04-2012, 07:16 PM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canteringleap    
Do you live in a desert?
I wish, for the sake of my horse's feet! I live in Victoria, Oz. Here's an article on one study done on hoof goops, by way of disagreeing with your farrier The Horse | Hoof Dressings: What Studies Show

As for his feet being tender unshod, need details if you want more specific opinion, but yes, domestic horses, with the way they're managed, generally need some protection/support for their feet in some environments we expect them to work. Hoof boots are a good answer for that.
     
    10-04-2012, 07:19 PM
  #8
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canteringleap    
There is slight brusing beside his bar. But he seems to be limping a bit too much for it to be caused just by a bruise,
Could be, as a bruise under hard horn can be like one under your fingernail. Could have formed an abscess too. Yeah, I'd be inclined to give him a few or more days before calling the vet over that. I wouldn't generally let a vet or farrier dig into the sole either, if they suspect abscess.
     

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