Cracking
 
 

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Cracking

This is a discussion on Cracking within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Keeping horses hooves from cracking
  • Horse hoof cracking

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    02-27-2012, 10:07 AM
  #1
Weanling
Cracking

I'm borrowing a neighbors horse as I just sold my mare. His horse is keeping my gelding sane. Anyway, his horse founders and is roughly 400lbs over weight. They inherited three horses when they bought the land so they're doing the best they can by them. While she's on my property I want to work with her a bit. Her hooves are cracked and I was wondering if there was something I could put on them to keep them from getting worse.
     
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    02-27-2012, 08:27 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Founder is a very painful condition for a horse- she needs to have her feed cut back immediately, including pasture access (grazing muzzle if necessary). If she's currently lame, I wouldn't work her at all.

If she is comfortable walking, I'd start with short, but regular sessions from the ground at the walk. Start with 20-30 minute sessions every other day. After a while, throw in some ground poles, and then work up to the trot. The important thing is to take it slow, but be consistent.
     
    02-27-2012, 10:38 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by furbabymum    
I'm borrowing a neighbors horse as I just sold my mare. His horse is keeping my gelding sane. Anyway, his horse founders and is roughly 400lbs over weight. They inherited three horses when they bought the land so they're doing the best they can by them. While she's on my property I want to work with her a bit. Her hooves are cracked and I was wondering if there was something I could put on them to keep them from getting worse.
Yes. You can apply the skills of a competent farrier and a veterinarian with a digital radiograph machine.

Short of that, there is no topical agent that will address any significant cracking of the hoof wall, founder or obesity.

As to "working" a severely overweight horse with cracked hooves, a history of laminitis and owned by someone else... I wouldn't touch that with a ten foot pole.

It's amazing how quickly a $200 pasture pet becomes a $25,000 top bred show prospect as soon as the lawyers get involved!

May prove to be the most expensive pasture pal for your gelding you could ever imagine.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    02-27-2012, 11:46 PM
  #4
Foal
I think it's great that you are trying to help this horse. Good for you!
This website has a lot of excellent information on horse hooves that you might find helpful. The left hand margin menue has a page on founder that is very informative.
Bare Foot Horse
     
    02-28-2012, 10:17 AM
  #5
Weanling
I was thinking more health and behavior wise. Not working on riding her or anything like that. She's just green broke and I don't have the skills for that anyway.
I guess I was looking for a topical agent that could help her. She had boots on when she was foundering badly. I don't feed her a lot and she has free roam of our acerage, as she did at the neighbors.
Behavior wise she doesn't respect personal space and she does circles around you when you lead her in a halter. I think I have the ability to at least fix that problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Yes. You can apply the skills of a competent farrier and a veterinarian with a digital radiograph machine.

Short of that, there is no topical agent that will address any significant cracking of the hoof wall, founder or obesity.

As to "working" a severely overweight horse with cracked hooves, a history of laminitis and owned by someone else... I wouldn't touch that with a ten foot pole.

It's amazing how quickly a $200 pasture pet becomes a $25,000 top bred show prospect as soon as the lawyers get involved!

May prove to be the most expensive pasture pal for your gelding you could ever imagine.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    02-28-2012, 03:19 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Yes. You can apply the skills of a competent farrier and a veterinarian with a digital radiograph machine.

Short of that, there is no topical agent that will address any significant cracking of the hoof wall, founder or obesity.

As to "working" a severely overweight horse with cracked hooves, a history of laminitis and owned by someone else... I wouldn't touch that with a ten foot pole.

It's amazing how quickly a $200 pasture pet becomes a $25,000 top bred show prospect as soon as the lawyers get involved!

May prove to be the most expensive pasture pal for your gelding you could ever imagine.

Cheers,
Mark
Allways the optimist.
loosie likes this.
     
    03-01-2012, 01:06 AM
  #7
Yearling
Grazing muzzle if there is loads of forage, vet and a skilled farrier/trimmer visit and consistent exercise and strict well informed dietary management forever. Preferably in that order.

Nothing topical will fix or even help this and can indeed make it worse.
loosie likes this.
     
    03-01-2012, 02:50 AM
  #8
Banned
Nothing topical will improve the horse's feet.

What's needed is a new owner and I'd caution you that you're not just enabling the current owner to continue with abuse and being used in the process.

I don't buy the "she inherited them and is doing the best".

She owns them and it's got chronic founder and it's 400 lbs overweight. That's shameful and it's appalling.

By all means IF you think you can make a difference then go for it but truthfully you're not going to do that by superficial stuff like putting things on her feet.

Neither will you necessarily make things better by doing a bit of training. If the horse is grossly overweight and has chronic founder and poor feet then it's going to be in severe pain and you really shouldn't be doing much of anything in terms of making it move until it's at least at x rays to check for pedal bone rotation and placement of the boney column and the attentions of a competent farrier with a track record of experience of dealing with such problems.

It also concerns me greatly that you're saying:

Quote:
I don't feed her a lot and she has free roam of our acerage, as she did at the neighbors.
You need to know what you're doing in terms of ensuring the horse is dieted off and if it's roaming on acreage with access to forage then in effect it's going to be eating what it wants, when it wants and that will be a reason why it's grossly obese and has chronic founder.

The horse needs a total change in regime to give it a real chance and not someone tinkering round the edges.
     
    03-01-2012, 02:57 AM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
Grazing muzzle if there is loads of forage, vet and a skilled farrier/trimmer visit and consistent exercise and strict well informed dietary management forever. Preferably in that order.

Nothing topical will fix or even help this and can indeed make it worse.
^^^agree with this 100%

I own a horse that is a founder case (before he came to me). It really is an uphill battle and I applaud you for it. BUT, for you to do any good for this horse you must be consistent. I strongly suggest you get a grazing muzzle for the horse (can be bought at Tractor Supply for about $30). Work well with your vet and farrier to get the hooves in shape and to learn what you need to know to get this horse in better shape.

ALSO, not sure if you have spoken about this with the horse's owner or not. You would do good to work with them on this (maybe split bills???) or at the very least get a WRITTEN agreement that you may have your vet/farrier/you work on this horse.

Good luck and keep at it....it is great once they turn around.
     
    03-01-2012, 07:03 AM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by bntnail    
Allways the optimist.
Hmm, yeah, but I think in this litiginous(sp?) society, it needs serious consideration unfortunately. Agree with lilbit about written agreements & I'd be inclined to try to help the horse & keep written records of everything including reasons for doing what you're doing.

Agree basically with everything said, except that I think hoopla is assuming & judging unfairly. Perhaps you know the people personally hoopla, but if not, who are you to say you 'don't buy it' based just on OP's post?? Many people have the best of intentions but lack the knowledge(or are advised badly) to provide appropriate care. If you don't know what you don't know & have no one to advise you otherwise, I don't think getting blamed for your ignorance is fair or reasonable. Based on what furbaby has told, I think they & their neighbours are probably doing the best with the knowledge they have and should be supported in that, especially that they're asking for help & advice(even if it's here, when I think you'd be better forgetting the forums in favour of a good equine vet & rehabilitation specialist)

IMO the horse needs a vet(& rads), farrier, strict diet(without starving it), free movement & exercise, & hoof protection in the form of padded boots or such, if it's not comfortable in it's environment. IMO your neighbours - & you if you want to take the horse on - need to do some serious research. I'd advise first-hand expert help, but to get you started, safergrass.org & hoofrehab.com will give you some good info to go on with. If you can't/don't want to put in the necessary effort, well, you know what they say about the road to hell & good intentions.... in that case, I'd agree with Mark & not touch it. I'd also be concerned for the other horses in your neighbour's care.
     

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