Crocs for Horses
 
 

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Crocs for Horses

This is a discussion on Crocs for Horses within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • CROCS FOR HORSE
  • Slip on crocks for horses

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  • 1 Post By tinyliny

 
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    01-03-2014, 02:03 PM
  #1
Yearling
Crocs for Horses

A non-horsey family member of mine posted this article on my Facebook wall and asked my opinion.

Crocs for horses: Plastic slip-on hooves that making nailing horseshoes a thing of the past | Mail Online

Now, I'm forever a skeptic before a believer so I was hesitant on my opinion on them. I don't want to form a full opinion before I ask others. My mother (also a horse person) was also skeptic.

I have a few questions about them:

- How can they be more comfortable for the horses if horses cannot feel regular shoes?
- Would they suction off in mud?
- Would the glue used to put them of affect the hooves in any way?
- Would the part of the hoof covered by them be unable to handle the elements if they were to remove the shoe?

Does anyone know anything about these? Would you use them on your animals?

They'd be fun for a parade or something (they come in many fun colors) but I'm not sure about full time.

Anyway, as you can see, I'm pretty leery about them, maybe someone can further inform me and answer some of my (and anyone else's) questions.
     
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    01-03-2014, 08:45 PM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForeverSunRider    
A non-horsey family member of mine posted this article on my Facebook wall and asked my opinion.

Crocs for horses: Plastic slip-on hooves that making nailing horseshoes a thing of the past | Mail Online

Now, I'm forever a skeptic before a believer so I was hesitant on my opinion on them. I don't want to form a full opinion before I ask others. My mother (also a horse person) was also skeptic.

I have a few questions about them:

- How can they be more comfortable for the horses if horses cannot feel regular shoes?
- Would they suction off in mud?
- Would the glue used to put them of affect the hooves in any way?
- Would the part of the hoof covered by them be unable to handle the elements if they were to remove the shoe?

Does anyone know anything about these? Would you use them on your animals?

They'd be fun for a parade or something (they come in many fun colors) but I'm not sure about full time.

Anyway, as you can see, I'm pretty leery about them, maybe someone can further inform me and answer some of my (and anyone else's) questions.
I'm a boot person and by no means an expert, but I'll attempt to answer some of your questions based on my experiences with boots v. Shoes:

- How can they be more comfortable for the horses if horses cannot feel regular shoes?

While horses cannot feel the shoes themselves, they can feel the concussion brought about by harder metal shoes. You also have to have a different shape of hoof in order to nail the shoes through than if the horse was barefoot, which again changes how the hoof lands and the effects further up the horse's leg. These would provide more cushion, less concussion, and allow you to keep your horse's hoof in a natural barefoot shape since you don't need a place to put nails through it.

- Would the glue used to put them of affect the hooves in any way?

I assume the glue is similar to the glue used for glue-on boots that many endurance riders use and leave on for a week or so at a time during events. This does not harm the hooves in any way.

I'd only be guessing at your other two questions. I'm still skeptical about these crocs though and much prefer to go barefoot and use boots when protection is needed. That eliminates any bad effects that might be related to your other questions, but more importantly to me allows the horse to use the frog like it's supposed to be used, which is the weight-bearing portion of the hoof. Lack of stimulation and the resulting poor frog formation is one of the big reasons I go barefoot. I anticipate these would have those same issues.
     
    01-03-2014, 08:45 PM
  #3
Yearling
It will be interesting to see how these turn out, though. I'll be keeping an eye out for more information and research about their use and resulting effects.
     
    01-03-2014, 09:04 PM
  #4
Yearling
I cannot help but wonder if years from now they will have done enough studies and used the glue on shoes enough to know if the glue does damage. Chemicals being absorbed into the foot or the glue harming the outer layer of foot itself. As of now, there seem to be quite a few people using them.
     
    01-03-2014, 09:27 PM
  #5
Green Broke
It looks like this shoe wants to be a combination of a traditional horse shoe and a boot.

Glue-on horseshoes have been around for a while. How successful they are I don't know as I don't have any experience with glue-on shoes of any kind, but these just seem to be another version of a glue-on shoe.

Like someone else mentioned, endurance riders have been using glue-on boots for a long time with great results. Although there is no access to the bottom of the hoof so you don't want to leave them on longer than a race.

Pros: Reduced concussion compared to a regular shoe. No nail holes (although I am not convinced nails do all that much damage).

You might also get similar results from using a shoe with a pad, although I like the easy access to the bottom of the hoof with this new shoe.

Cons: Perhaps durability? Perhaps cost? I don't know how easy they are to shape and apply (or if shaping is even possible) and I don't know how well glue-ons stay on. Also, I would wonder a bit about moisture getting under the very large tabs. I would guess the adhesive would help keep moisture out, but that would be a slight concern on my part (being that I don't know anything about these shoes in particular, so I don't know if that is a legitimate concern).

So really, other than some concussion reduction, which could also be done with a regular shoe and pad, or better yet, with boots and pads, I don't really see the big break-through? Maybe it's trying to bring together the best of both worlds.....the concussion reduction and no-nails of a boot with a shoe that can be left on like a regular horse shoe. Maybe that is the niche.

If you want fun colors and no nails, you could also just use boots. I am a boot user myself. I like that my horses can have strong feet and not wear shoes 99% of their day and I only have to put boots on them if I happen to be riding in the rocks on a particular day. It's sort of like our own shoes..... we can run around the house barefoot and just put our shoes on when we go out.

But you know, if these shoes work well, which they probably do, I have absolutely no problem with them. More tools in the farrier's arsenal is always a good idea. And they might fit into that niche of horses that can benefit from boots but you really don't want to leave boots on 24/7 but if the horse isn't sound barefoot, what do you do? This could fit the niche for those horses. In other words, its still not barefoot but it might be better than a regular shoe for horses with soundness issues that can't be comfortable barefoot.

I wonder if they are hard to remove?
     
    01-03-2014, 09:30 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga    
I cannot help but wonder if years from now they will have done enough studies and used the glue on shoes enough to know if the glue does damage. Chemicals being absorbed into the foot or the glue harming the outer layer of foot itself. As of now, there seem to be quite a few people using them.
That is a concern I hadn't really thought about. Women are probably doing the same thing all the time with their fingernails. The outer layer of the hoof is "dead" and other than water, I don't know how much is actually absorbed. But even if the outer layer was damaged, that would all be trimmed away in time anyhow.

I would kind of worry about excess moisture seeping in and weakening the hoof wall. But maybe the glue seals that out.
     
    01-03-2014, 09:54 PM
  #7
Super Moderator
My experience with the magical glue-on shoes didn't go over so well. I had them put on Wed. Afternoon and hauled to a show The next morning. By that afternoon my first magical shoe flew off. ($150) I had the farrier at the show remove them and nail some aluminums on that same day. He had to rebuild the hoof with acrylic as well because the hoof had ripped with the glue on....

Wasn't the best experience....
     
    01-03-2014, 10:53 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
Hope the farrier gets all his fingers out before the 3 minutes are up.
Captain Evil likes this.
     
    01-03-2014, 11:02 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
hope the farrier gets all his fingers out before the 3 minutes are up.

Now there's an image...
     
    01-04-2014, 12:48 AM
  #10
Foal
Naturally, I am a skeptic but my thoughts are that by looking at where the glue connects to the hoof I feel like they wouldn't stay on too long if you are a trail rider. The natural hoof flexes, which could break the glue bond. Also, horses clip from time to time and it seems like it would pull off too easy... I am the kind that would wait to hear reviews on long distance use.
     

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