Deep Sulcus Thrush - the nightmare begins - Page 2
   

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Deep Sulcus Thrush - the nightmare begins

This is a discussion on Deep Sulcus Thrush - the nightmare begins within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Equine deep sulcuos thrush heel bulb crack
  • Bleeding hoof in equine thrush

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    04-18-2012, 12:08 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Apply "Tomorrow" dry cow mastitis treatment from Fort Dodge products to the central sulcus. Stuff cotton balls into the sulcus after application.

The active ingredient is cephapirin. It delivers bactericidal levels of antibiotic to the effected area. The product acts in a prolonged manner via the low solubility of the gel.

Iodine is effective when used in a dry environment but its solubility in water reduces that value in a wet environment.

Your local feed store should carry it or you can find it here: ToMORROW® Dry Cow

Cheers,
Mark
Horseman56 and several others recommended I do this with Rascal. I had been having a reoccurring problem since I got him. That stuff worked wonders! It cleared up and we have had no problems since then. It was also a very economical way to treat it. I had spent a mint on other treatments at this point. I now keep a tube on hand for the just in case occasion.
     
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    04-18-2012, 12:08 PM
  #12
Yearling
Treatments such as thrush busters and homemade remedies work fine in that they give the horse a 'boost' so to speak. Just like with humans though, ultimately it's the body that heals itself and treatments are just used to help it along. The cure for thrush is also the prevention: Living in drier conditions with ample (ideally unlimited) opportunity to move around. In other words, creating an environment for your horse un-friendly to the development of hoof problems. It's not always possible to do, but generally the closer a horse lives to what nature intended the healthier it will be. It requires some creativity on the part of the person to do but the rewards are worth it!
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    04-18-2012, 12:17 PM
  #13
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Thrush buster also works really well.

But you're going to need a dry place first. Go find one.. stuff your horse's frog full of cotton, push it in deep and squirt Thrush buster on the cotton and over the frog. Change it out daily and you'll see improvement. Spray apple cider on the frog to dry it out and keep the thrush at bay.

Best of luck, OP.
I don't think Thrush Buster is to be used on deep sore tissue. It is good for mild cases & keeping thrush at bay.
When it's that bad the 'cow dry' treatment is best along with exposure to air & keeping it dry.

I hope the OP can find some short term housing to get this under control.
Maybe hiding the runner mat under a big pile of shavings would encourage the horse to stand on it.
     
    04-18-2012, 12:24 PM
  #14
Foal
For severe thrush infections get the cattle and pig antibiotic crumbles called Aureccycin (sp?) and sprinkle on top of the daily ration. This is advice from a vet my co worker got when she was dealing with a situation similar to yours. (bad thrush, wld, could barley touch horses feet)

As far as honey goes I love it. The honey must be raw honey though, not processed. It is a antibacterial, antifungal, and does not seem to get "tired" and less effective with time like some other treatments, also it will not harm good tissue.

Right now I have a horse with a permanent crack in his front hoof and the only thing to to is keep bacteria and fungus out of the crack. I keep a jar in my barn filled with cotton balls or strips of gauze soaking in honey. I clean his hooves out daily, spray the bottoms with plain vinegar (does not need to be apple cider, although that kind does smell better) for the crack I pull out the used gauze strip every other day, flush it out, and pack with another honey gauze strip. I have done this with other horses having thrush and wld and it always works, plus it's very low cost compared to the thrush remedy's in the feed store here.

I have not ever seen the Tomorrow treatment before. Sadly our choices here are limited as far as this sort of thing goes.
     
    04-18-2012, 04:31 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseman56    
Apply "Tomorrow" dry cow mastitis treatment from Fort Dodge products to the central sulcus. Stuff cotton balls into the sulcus after application.

The active ingredient is cephapirin. It delivers bactericidal levels of antibiotic to the effected area. The product acts in a prolonged manner via the low solubility of the gel.


Your local feed store should carry it or you can find it here: ToMORROW® Dry Cow

Cheers,
Mark

I second the dry cow. I also neglected to notice sulcus thrush when I was a new horse owner a few years ago. The farrier was able to stick the hoof pick a good 2"s into his heel bulb. Like you, I felt like crap for putting my horse through that. The dry cow stuff worked great. I used it every other day, stuffed a few cotton balls in the hole to keep it exposed to air. The entire thing filled in within 3 weeks.

I've since learned as much as I could about hoof health and have not had a repeat incident. Don't feel bad. There's nothing wrong with ignorance.
     
    04-19-2012, 07:12 AM
  #16
Weanling
Thank you for all your suggestions - I really appreciate it! I spoke with my vet today who laid out a plan of action:

1) treat the infection - hydrogen peroxide and apple cider vinegar (these will sting)
2) identify any underlying pathology in the heel region.
3) correct hoof balance so that Candy starts landing heel first rather than toe first.

I also purchased some No Thrush today! From what I've read it seems to be a goer - Candy also let me drag cotton tips soaked in iodine through the cracks.
The vet wants me to keep going with iodine gauze and bandages so I might invest in some boots she can wear in the paddock to try and keep the hooves dry (or stable if I can get one).

I took some photos of the front hooves and the back before her trim. I also have two shots of the front hooves after the trim - but not the back, sorry, but it was bucketing down with rain T_T

The farrier shaved the frog back a bit and actually said he couldn't see thrush and that the frog looked quite healthy underneath? Cases he has seen horses with thrush have the foot bleeding and the frog red raw =\ anyway... have a look and see what you think (her hooves are no where near ideal)
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    04-19-2012, 07:45 AM
  #17
QOS
Green Broke
Biscuit had a deep sulcus with thrush. This is what I did to get rid of it...mix athlete's feet medication from the pharmacy (one of those little tubes of goo) with the same size tube of Neosporin. Mix well and take a syringe with a curved plastic squirter thingy instead of a needle. Put a teaspoon or so amount in the syringe. Gently insert the tip into the crack and push the mix into the crack. Cover crack with Desitin to keep water/dirt out.

We also soaked our horses feet in a bath of water/apple cider vinegar. The barn converted an old dog run into a water bath! All four feet at one time to get a good soak and get the vinegar where we wanted it.

Biscuit still has a slight line in one of his hooves but it is way better than it was. His frog was very contracted and it is now expanded some.
     
    04-19-2012, 09:16 AM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SallyRC123    
I spoke with my vet today who laid out a plan of action:

1) treat the infection - hydrogen peroxide and apple cider vinegar (these will sting)
2) identify any underlying pathology in the heel region.
3) correct hoof balance so that Candy starts landing heel first rather than toe first.
Interesting protocol approach. Reminiscent of the adage, "putting the horse before the cart".

I'll play the devil's advocate as an educational exercise.

Besides suggesting there is a hoof "balance" problem (there is), did the vet explain why there is a hoof balance problem, how the imbalance manifests, and how it should be resolved?

Does the veterinarian see the "underlying pathology" as unrelated to the "hoof balance" problem?

Did the trim resolve the "toe first landing" associated with the imbalanced hoof?

Should all horses always land heel first?

There is an etiology to pathological diagnostics. It's a "chicken or the egg" puzzle that leads us to correct protocol.

Quote:
I also purchased some No Thrush today! From what I've read it seems to be a goer - Candy also let me drag cotton tips soaked in iodine through the cracks.
From what you've read in this thread, a product that delivers low solubility, bactericidal levels of antibiotic "seems to be a goer" for a horse living in chronic wet environs.

Quote:
the vet wants me to keep going with iodine gauze and bandages so I might invest in some boots she can wear in the paddock to try and keep the hooves dry (or stable if I can get one).
Wrapping an imbalanced, distorted, contracted, shearing, bacterial/fungal infected foot in a largely anaerobic rubber container that will leak, increase breakover length and move the base of support even further posterior the limb axis is... an interesting approach.

Quote:
The farrier shaved the frog back a bit and actually said he couldn't see thrush and that the frog looked quite healthy underneath?
I find these to be helpful.




Quote:
Cases he has seen horses with thrush have the foot bleeding and the frog red raw =\ anyway... have a look and see what you think (her hooves are no where near ideal)
I have little doubt that "cases he has seen horses with thrush have the foot bleeding and the frog red raw". Those are certainly good indicators!

Thank you for sharing your case.

Cheers,
Mark
     
    04-19-2012, 07:00 PM
  #19
Weanling
Glasses were always most helpful for me.
The hydrogen peroxide will not get rid off the thrush it will clean it but but you stillhave thrush. Water nd bleach solution is good snd not painful as the vinegar. Iodine is good in a dry environment. I use thrush x or copertox as well as iodine..
Good luck
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    04-19-2012, 10:00 PM
  #20
Weanling
Yes - Navicular Disease. Since its so wet here, I will try the vinegar soaks until I can get my hands on some "Tomorrow" dry cow mastitis treatment. I haven't been bandaging in the rain as its creating a lovely, warm, moist environment within the entire hoof for bacteria to thrive. I have also read about 'pete's goo' (athletes foot cream with neosporin) which I will also try. I think its a long road ahead in this wet weather :(
     

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