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Diagnose these hooves?! Lameness problems :D

This is a discussion on Diagnose these hooves?! Lameness problems :D within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        07-29-2014, 06:56 AM
      #11
    Foal
    You might also consider getting some hoof boots for riding him outside the arena. They are used to help with everything from simple tender soles - to founder and lamnitis.

    If it's navicular - there are pain blocking injections every few months. One of the hunt jump lesson horses at a friend's barn has that. Eventually the condition will get worse and horse will have to be retired.
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        07-29-2014, 09:25 AM
      #12
    Weanling
    Your horse was just trimmed? I see (now I am offering the disclaimer "I think I am seeing") what appears to be a lot of retained sole, which can created big bruising. But if your horse is retaining that sole to protect a foundered foot that is not a simple matter.

    But those are feet with serious issues and I do not think your farrier is doing you a service.

    ETA: I take it back about the retained sole, I really don't know. That frog is really throwing me off. But if the farrier was just out a week ago......I am not impressed.
         
        07-29-2014, 11:13 AM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    Sorry I do not know how to paste and pick.
    I marked the interesting part, how can a vet connect a sore back to the lameness?
    Since the Hoof testers showed nada other than on the frog then my suspiction goes to the navi problem.
    Be interesting to see what the x-rays show.
    She says that because he's been compensating for pain, that he's shifting his weight and traveling in such a manner as to take weight off of the inside front right, and therefore more weight is on the back left. Kind of like if we were running with two completely different shoes on -- I don't know about you, but my back would definitely feel that, so it made sense to me.
         
        07-29-2014, 11:16 AM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by greenhaven    
    Your horse was just trimmed? I see (now I am offering the disclaimer "I think I am seeing") what appears to be a lot of retained sole, which can created big bruising. But if your horse is retaining that sole to protect a foundered foot that is not a simple matter.

    But those are feet with serious issues and I do not think your farrier is doing you a service.

    ETA: I take it back about the retained sole, I really don't know. That frog is really throwing me off. But if the farrier was just out a week ago......I am not impressed.
    **I tend to be on the same page, but was looking for other input before I go shopping. I'll have to travel over 80 miles to find another one, and in my neck of the woods, folks are quite "ranchy" and are not nearly as picky about hooves as I tend to be. But I'm a firm believer that all soundness starts in the feet AND that many of my ranch friends have horses with soundness issues that they don't even realize...
         
        07-29-2014, 11:18 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 2scicrazed    
    You might also consider getting some hoof boots for riding him outside the arena. They are used to help with everything from simple tender soles - to founder and lamnitis.

    If it's navicular - there are pain blocking injections every few months. One of the hunt jump lesson horses at a friend's barn has that. Eventually the condition will get worse and horse will have to be retired.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I've wondered the same thing -- navicular. I'll have him xrayed as soon as fair season is behind us. Vets should be much more likely to be able to get us in then. Here's hoping that it's just a farrier issue at this point and that it hasn't gotten too far down that road. :/
         
        07-29-2014, 11:21 AM
      #16
    Foal
    I'm headed out to the barn in just a minute. I'll clean really well and take a couple more pics just for some more clear and thorough feedback. If I can video some movement, I will and link video.

    I typically love living in a rural envirnment -- until I have a need that I have no resources available to help me when I need it.
         
        07-29-2014, 12:25 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I just took these this morning. It's amazing what gating him out of the wet area, deep cleaning, and treatment for thrush has done in less than 24 hours. I'm still not sure I'm happy with the job the farrier is doing. He tends to grow a lot more heel and hoof wall on the inside of his right foot, causing him to turn out. When he's trimmed right, he doesn't look like he's turning out or tip-toeing
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg 72914 right side.jpg (74.4 KB, 120 views)
    File Type: jpg 72914 right front b.jpg (63.3 KB, 120 views)
    File Type: jpg 72914 left side.jpg (74.9 KB, 119 views)
    File Type: jpg 72914 right hoof shedding frog.jpg (68.9 KB, 120 views)
    File Type: jpg 72914 right hoof.jpg (35.4 KB, 119 views)
    File Type: jpg 72914 left hoof.jpg (32.2 KB, 122 views)
         
        07-29-2014, 12:50 PM
      #18
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smiley845    
    She says that because he's been compensating for pain, that he's shifting his weight and traveling in such a manner as to take weight off of the inside front right, and therefore more weight is on the back left. Kind of like if we were running with two completely different shoes on -- I don't know about you, but my back would definitely feel that, so it made sense to me.
    Though your feet are in a direct line to you hip and back, the horses front legs are not directly connected to the body so transmitting pain from a bad foot to the back seems like a loooong reach.
    Interesting therory, have to chew on that.

    Didnīt she say anyting about those feet? Looking at those last pics made my stomich do a Flipp/Flopp. Those feet need some Serious Work.
         
        07-29-2014, 12:59 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Hard to tell from the pictures, but is the apex (tip) of the frog a loose tag, or is the entire frog rotated/twisted? Is that just on the front right foot, or both?

    It's interesting to me that the medial heel grows back faster than the rest of the foot - this makes me think that the horse needs that extra growth there. By trimming a horses foot to look a certain way (or so that it doesn't toe in or out, etc), you can actually do more harm than good. Rarely is it just the hoof capsule that is affected in a crooked limb - by changing the shape and structure of the foot, you are affecting the bony column, as well as all of its ligaments, tendons, soft tissue, etc.

    The heels look quite long. Ideally, you want the heels to terminate at or near the last weight bearing surface of the frog to create a wide base of support at the back of the foot to encourage heel-first landings. Are any of these farriers in your area?

    ELPO Membership List - Farriers
    PixiTrix likes this.
         
        07-29-2014, 01:12 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    Though your feet are in a direct line to you hip and back, the horses front legs are not directly connected to the body so transmitting pain from a bad foot to the back seems like a loooong reach.
    Interesting therory, have to chew on that.

    Didnīt she say anyting about those feet? Looking at those last pics made my stomich do a Flipp/Flopp. Those feet need some Serious Work.
    If you don't think the back pain is related to improper carriage, what would you relate it to? He flinches when you run your fingernail down alongside the spine right over the kidney area (or run a curry). I have been told that hocks get sore if they are front-end heavy and using the rear end to carry themselves correctly like this picture of my daughter turning the first barrel on him, and he's obviously working off of his front end. Thoughts on that?

    The vet didn't specifically say, "Those feet are atrocious!", but she did advise getting a second farrier opinion and that she was curious what both my current farrier and second opinion farrier had to say.

    What do you see judging from pics alone?
         

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