Double hoof wall, laminar wedge??????
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Hoof Care

Double hoof wall, laminar wedge??????

This is a discussion on Double hoof wall, laminar wedge?????? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Laminar wedge hoof
  • Horse hoof lamellar wedge

Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By loosie

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-11-2014, 10:44 PM
  #1
Started
Double hoof wall, laminar wedge??????

It's a little harder to see on this picture than it is now. There is an area on Belle's hoof wall, on the lateral side, that looks like she has two hoof walls parallel to each other. It is more distinct now after her trim wasn't so fresh. I was thinking maybe it was laminar wedge...but isn't that only something that happens at the toe? You can clearly see how much wider her hoof is on that side on the sole, and if you were to use that 'inner' hoof wall bit, both sides would be more even. From the top of the hoof, it is not flared however. I did rasp the wall back a bit closer to that 'inner' wall line though. What in the world would that be???? I will try and get a picture this week of what it looks like now.

     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-12-2014, 12:07 AM
  #2
Foal
Are you talking about the line near the lateral heel that runs up to the quarters? It's hard to tell in the picture, but it looks to me like her sole has shed from that area to revel new growth. I would keep an eye on that area though, as it looks like there may be some bacteria tracks forming on the actual wall. Most horses have straighter medial hoof walls, with more curved lateral walls - it doesn't look too out of the ordinary to me.

Lamellar wedges form at the toe as a result of a laminitis/founder episode - from the underside of the foot, the toe will look stretched out, often with the white line area appearing very thick and brown or red in color.
     
    03-12-2014, 12:20 AM
  #3
Trained
Yeah, pic not clear, but I don't think that line(if that's what you're talking about) is obviously stretched or 'wedged' laminae'. Yes, it does happen elsewhere besides the toe though. That's just generally where the long term excess pressure is worst. Reckon there may be a bit of a wedge on the medial toe corner tho.

An aside; It appears that her heels are short enough but not too short in that(those) pics, but if rads indicate a ground parallel or negative palmer P3 then frog wedges may be a good move, to support & help stimulate the digital cushion without building heels up too much.
KigerQueen likes this.
     
    03-12-2014, 08:20 AM
  #4
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Yeah, pic not clear, but I don't think that line(if that's what you're talking about) is obviously stretched or 'wedged' laminae'. Yes, it does happen elsewhere besides the toe though. That's just generally where the long term excess pressure is worst. Reckon there may be a bit of a wedge on the medial toe corner tho.

An aside; It appears that her heels are short enough but not too short in that(those) pics, but if rads indicate a ground parallel or negative palmer P3 then frog wedges may be a good move, to support & help stimulate the digital cushion without building heels up too much.
Thanks Loosie.....I will try and get another picture since it really did become more clear since this picture was taken. She does have a coronary band injury in that part of the foot...maybe that contributed to the deformity?? With each trim....I see new things it seems.
     
    03-12-2014, 09:00 PM
  #5
Weanling
If you mean the long narrow ridge on the sole back from the quarter to the heel, it looks like just an odd ridge of dead sole to me. And with some hoof wall separation.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hoof wall angle Walker Hoof Care 8 09-22-2013 03:34 AM
Hoof wall Breella Hoof Care 3 09-15-2012 02:57 AM
Hoof Wall Bruising ??? What can this mean? TruCharm Hoof Care 8 09-03-2012 01:21 AM
Hoof wall.. problems? jennakajb Hoof Care 23 02-18-2012 04:45 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0