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dragging feet

This is a discussion on dragging feet within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Horse dragging toes video

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    02-12-2013, 08:30 PM
  #11
Yearling
We can't really help you much more without a good set of hoof photos and a video of her moving illustrating the toe dragging would be greatly helpful. Everything is just a guess without more info. That picture shows me what could either be a badly flared toe that is being drug off or a toe that is way too short being drug off. There isnt enough info with just one view to get a 3D idea of the overall hoof shape.
     
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    02-12-2013, 10:33 PM
  #12
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
We can't really help you much more without a good set of hoof photos and a video of her moving illustrating the toe dragging would be greatly helpful. Everything is just a guess without more info. That picture shows me what could either be a badly flared toe that is being drug off or a toe that is way too short being drug off. There isnt enough info with just one view to get a 3D idea of the overall hoof shape.
Thanks for your response. I was going to post pictures and video today too but... :) I am glad to report that I had one of the top farriers in my area come out and assess her. I got lucky and he happen to be in the area when I called and had time to stop by.

So what I learned:
I was right to change farriers...

There was 2 very sweet and gentle men who showed up even after my horrible directions (idk how to make the red face but *embarrassing*). Called my mare by sweet pet names like sis, hun, baby girl :) kinda funny to see a couple cowboys all "teddy bear" like and my mare is pony sized too :)
They made me feel like they cared and I didn't feel stupid asking questions about everything. They explained every step of the way without hesitation.
Another thing that stood out was that they took the time to assess WHY she drags her feet. 2 reasons: conformation and scar tissue in one of her shoulders.
She is ridable! She'll never do endurance but that's OK :)
Solutions are:
Getting her shod would keep her feet pretty but could risk more damage because she has no give or release, would be harder on her shoulder. I can't explain it how I want but the farrier made sense the way he showed me. I'm a visual learner.

We decided to keep her barefoot with weekly trims for the next 2 weeks. Then monthly trims until we can balance her out and properly align her legs and feet, correct angles, etc...

My last farrier really trimmed her badly. One side of her heel was almost 1/2 inch higher. Heels were way too high anyway...

... uh oh gotta run, can't be late for work.... finish update soon :)
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    02-14-2013, 02:48 PM
  #13
Yearling


All trimmed up :) another appointment in a few days as well

Turns out she has scar tissue in her shoulder which hinders her natural movement and her natural conformation doesn't help any either.

Any suggestions on how I can get her shoulder loosened up? I can't change her conformation but I can try to get her moving better via stretches, supplements, what do you guys suggest. I'm going to be calling my vet for her opinion as well.
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    02-14-2013, 04:39 PM
  #14
Yearling
I would do some cavaletti poles a few times a week, with or without a bute tablet.
     
    02-14-2013, 05:33 PM
  #15
Yearling
Thanks. We have started cavaletti to get her to balance and collect herself, along with trying to get her to pick up her feet and fix her hay belly too LoL luckily I don't think she needs bute at least not yet. So far she never acts sore or like she is in pain. Her shoulder doesn't seem to bother her. I'm worried as she gets worked more that it could get sore though. So Im curious what I can do to safely increase her exercise and how to free up movement in her shoulder so she doesnt drag her feet as bad.
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    02-14-2013, 06:09 PM
  #16
Trained
Massage.
Get a massage therapist out and have her/him show you how to do it.
Your new farriers sound very sweet and knowledgeable and, from what I can see, have done a good job. Treat them well
walkinthewalk likes this.
     
    02-14-2013, 06:32 PM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Massage.
Get a massage therapist out and have her/him show you how to do it.
Your new farriers sound very sweet and knowledgeable and, from what I can see, have done a good job. Treat them well
This may sound silly but where do I even find an equine massage therapist? And how can I tell if they are truly knowledgeable? Also how much do they typically charge? I'm in Central Oregon if that helps answer my questions any.

I am very very very satisfied with my new farriers and am keeping them around for sure!
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    02-14-2013, 06:56 PM
  #18
Trained
Certified Equissage Graduates | Equine Sports Massage Therapy

Two in Oregon, and one of them specialized in Arabians....can't get much better
     
    02-14-2013, 07:17 PM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Certified Equissage Graduates | Equine Sports Massage Therapy

Two in Oregon, and one of them specialized in Arabians....can't get much better
Thank you! I called and left the Arab specialist a message :) hope I can get an appointment soon, her web page was very knowledgeable and her prices were reasonable too.
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    02-14-2013, 08:03 PM
  #20
Trained
Great
     

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