Dry Shelly Hoofs Will Not Get Better...
 
 

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Dry Shelly Hoofs Will Not Get Better...

This is a discussion on Dry Shelly Hoofs Will Not Get Better... within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • hoof crack coronary band
  • What is dry shelly

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    07-20-2012, 02:48 PM
  #1
Foal
Dry Shelly Hoofs Will Not Get Better...

I'm sure the answer is here somewhere. I tried searching and enjoyed all I read but didn't see--please please feel free to point me in an obvious direction if I missed it being right in front of my nose.

I've had my horse for ~a year. His feet were not good when I got him and then they went straight down hill. I changed barns and farriers and he's made such a difference. I have him on a supplement for his feet--called Equitin, 100mg of biotin per serving and I forget the levels of the other things. I have been using rainmaker, the farrier has him in corrective type shoes (he was so out of balance and flaring was out of control and one hoof cracked all the way through the coronary band). New growth is much better and stronger (coat is wonderful, too) but his feet are so dry it is a disaster. The farrier keeps telling me he can't do anything else until we can get the dryness under control. He has come back from EPM in his early life, he has EPSM and I feed accordingly, and he has supplements and electrolytes, and trace mineral salts, etc...What can I do? His feet are just crumbling Can anyone recommend something that will help? Hay was tested, it is good quality and forage is good...I just don't know what else to do and even my farrier is frustrated....his feet are embarrassing and though he doesn't act as if they bother him, I can't imagine they feel good!
     
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    07-20-2012, 05:18 PM
  #2
Started
Get rid of the hoof dressing. They do no good and may even cause harm.

Maybe some pics of his feet?
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    07-20-2012, 05:23 PM
  #3
Green Broke

Wet the feet before you apply the hoof dressing as it's made to hold moisture in, not add moisture by it's self.
     
    07-20-2012, 05:36 PM
  #4
Weanling
Pics would be lovely.
I'd talk to the farrier about doing glue-on shoes. It allows the hoof to expand and function normally (shoes tend to reduce the natural expansion), reduces shock from walking (which can worsen cracks), and can even help with moisture balance since most glue-ons have a sole. Check out Renegades or Easyboot glue-ons.
I personally would ditch the shoes. Boots seem like the better option. Through a big roll on the toe, let him prance around a level field 24/7, and I think he'd do just fine.
Might want to think about your supplement choices. 20mg per dose is at the higher end of the biotin-dosage spectrum. 100mg is not something I've ever heard of before. I'd think you'd get the same results with just 20mg. Do remember that feeding a biotin supplement can cause the body to reduce its own biotin manufacturing, meaning that if you take him off the supplement, his hooves go downhill because his body isn't making biotin for itself anymore.
So I'd go for the lowest dose that works for him, and I'd give it a few months off in the winter to let his body pick up on making its own biotin.
Check out smartpakequine.com for more hoof supplement options. They have biotin alongside zinc and other ingredients that really seem to help, and it's cheaper than what you're paying.
By us the ground is super dry, so everyone's hooves are super dry. Try wetting the area around the water trough so he stands in mud a few times a day.
     
    07-20-2012, 07:38 PM
  #5
Started
"Dry" is not the problem. It's not even A problem. The problem here is brittleness. The research I've done says that the drier the horn, the stronger it is, if it is healthy.

My research also supports SueNH's opinion. Here's an interesting article on the subject. The Horse | Hoof Dressings: What Studies Show

ETA Sometimes it makes it easier on the farrier to soak feet or overflow a water tank the night before. This makes the hoof horn a little softer, which makes trimming easier. It's only useful, though, when the horse has very hard hooves, IME.
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    07-20-2012, 08:28 PM
  #6
Trained
To give you something towards an informed decision on hoof dressings.... The Horse | Hoof Dressings: What Studies Show

'Shelly' or 'brittle' feet are commonly a nutritional &/or diet problem. Nutritional changes can take many months to start to be seen in the feet. While biotin is one nutrient that may be deficient & helpful to supplement, there are many others too, such as copper, zinc, iodine, magnesium, amino acids.... High starch diets, or horses allowed to be overweight & become IR are also reasons why hoof quality may be compromised in this way. It could also be due to infection such as seedy toe, or even hooves being too wet.

Vertical cracks usually have a mechanical cause(eg imbalance, too much pressure on walls, such as keeping them shod in conventional rims), but the above will also contribute to it, so also part of the solution. Infection needs to be dealt with effectively, which may mean resecting, and good trimming to ensure balance & relieve the walls.

What are 'correctional' shoes for? I'd personally keep this horse out of shoes by the sounds of it, to better allow his feet to heal. Hoof boots are usually a valid alternative where protection is required.
     
    07-20-2012, 11:15 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by SueNH    
Get rid of the hoof dressing. They do no good and may even cause harm.

Maybe some pics of his feet?
I will try and take some tomorrow--I try NOT to photograph his feet--they look awful--but I will do so!
     
    07-20-2012, 11:24 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha    

Wet the feet before you apply the hoof dressing as it's made to hold moisture in, not add moisture by it's self.
I try to apply that way but am not always successful--would you say that applying it to his feet if they are not wet is worse than not doing it? If so, I will skip it at the times I cannot get them wet first! I didn't think of it that way but it makes since.
     
    07-20-2012, 11:34 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by rascalboy    
Pics would be lovely.
I'd talk to the farrier about doing glue-on shoes. It allows the hoof to expand and function normally (shoes tend to reduce the natural expansion), reduces shock from walking (which can worsen cracks), and can even help with moisture balance since most glue-ons have a sole. Check out Renegades or Easyboot glue-ons.
I personally would ditch the shoes. Boots seem like the better option. Through a big roll on the toe, let him prance around a level field 24/7, and I think he'd do just fine.
Might want to think about your supplement choices. 20mg per dose is at the higher end of the biotin-dosage spectrum. 100mg is not something I've ever heard of before. I'd think you'd get the same results with just 20mg. Do remember that feeding a biotin supplement can cause the body to reduce its own biotin manufacturing, meaning that if you take him off the supplement, his hooves go downhill because his body isn't making biotin for itself anymore.
So I'd go for the lowest dose that works for him, and I'd give it a few months off in the winter to let his body pick up on making its own biotin.
Check out smartpakequine.com for more hoof supplement options. They have biotin alongside zinc and other ingredients that really seem to help, and it's cheaper than what you're paying.
By us the ground is super dry, so everyone's hooves are super dry. Try wetting the area around the water trough so he stands in mud a few times a day.
I will ask him--I didn't even know there was such a thing as glue on shoes! As for the amount of biotin, hmmm...that's interesting, I didn't know they would stop making it, I thought it was water soluable so whatever is not used just exits the system--well, I can certainly cut his supplement back to a third of a scoop--there are measurements on there and I do my own grain and supplements each day. The new growth does not seem to be as brittle as the old--he's been with the new farrier for 6 months and the hoof is a little more than half grown out--the new part looks good but stomping because of flies and the overall condition of his feet are starting to cause the little tiny cracks (old farrier said superficial don't worry about them, drafts have bad feet--new farrier says, drafts can have good feet and cracks are not ok). I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to go barefoot. He has some deficits due to the EPM and he crosses his front legs when standing for long periods and then trying to move--he constantly rakes his legs with his shoes--in the winter with the studs it was horrible--he only has fronts, but still, I would like to see his feet hold together enough to go barefoot. I will inquire about the shoes and I will definitely research the biotin level...thank you!
     
    07-20-2012, 11:39 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by aforred    
"Dry" is not the problem. It's not even A problem. The problem here is brittleness. The research I've done says that the drier the horn, the stronger it is, if it is healthy.

My research also supports SueNH's opinion. Here's an interesting article on the subject. The Horse | Hoof Dressings: What Studies Show

ETA Sometimes it makes it easier on the farrier to soak feet or overflow a water tank the night before. This makes the hoof horn a little softer, which makes trimming easier. It's only useful, though, when the horse has very hard hooves, IME.
Posted via Mobile Device
Oh my--I'm starting to feel like this is a "no good deed" situation. His feet just imploded and while they are "better" that is just a relative term--I will try and get photos and post. Thanks so much for the link! I will take some time with it. I really really appreciate all the help and thoughts and advice.
     

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