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Equi-cast/socks?

This is a discussion on Equi-cast/socks? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        07-12-2012, 08:15 PM
      #11
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RubaiyateBandit    
    The old farrier came out every six months; we switched to a new farrier awhile back (the old one was , and he's only done their feet twice so far - in March
    Well there's a big part of your problem, that no amount of booting or otherwise is going to get around. Generally speaking IME, healthy feet shouldn't go longer than about 8 weeks at the very outside, while compromised feet should be done on average at least 4 weekly, if you want to see improvement.

    Quote:
    again on June 14th. I wish I had a picture that I could demonstrate with, but he really does trim them quite well - these two mares just don't have a lot to work with, and seem to grow especially fast on top of it.
    They have a lot of excess & while I don't know what this guy started with, so that is a factor, I'm still comfortable saying you don't know what constitutes a good trim if you're saying that. They wouldn't have grown that quickly, but re over fast growth, that's another possible symptom of laminitis.

    Quote:
    I'm aware of their nutritional issues, and straightening that out is a work in progress - we have no way of graining them each a prescribed ration ('least not that we've figured out), so they get mostly pasture and mineral blocks. (And with Tanner laid up and kept separate, she actually gets hay, a mineral block, and grain + joint and hoof supplements).
    Good that they don't get grain, esp with the possiblity of metabolic probs.... but then you say Tanner does get grain, so presuming you have other horses that are 'they'. Mineral blocks unfortunately don't provide much in the way of anything, at least unless the horse actually munches them regularly & then they may get too much salt... I'd personally consult a nutritionist(independant of feed co), but I think it's at least a good move to give them a good quality complete nutritional supp.

    Quote:
    I'd love to say that I could grab another farrier and get a second, in-person, opinion, but there's only three farriers
    While I think it's important for people to learn the principles & factors of hoof health for themselves anyway, sounds like it may be necessary for you to learn more than that, so you don't have to rely on shoddy 'experts' to do it.
    smrobs likes this.
         
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        07-13-2012, 09:20 PM
      #12
    Showing
    I'm sorry, but I have to agree with Loosie. From what I can see, the biggest problem you have is lack of adequate and frequent hoof care. If they were being trimmed properly and the look like that after being done only a month ago, then there is something seriously wrong going on here. In all honesty, those hooves look like they've been without any sort of care at all for months and months. If they really grow so fast that they look like that after a month, then maybe they need to be on a 2-week or weekly rotation to keep them in shape and then figure out if it truly is laminitic changes that are causing the fast growth.

    I'm not even an expert hoof-man, but I'm not impressed in the slightest with what I'm seeing in the pictures.
         
        07-13-2012, 10:16 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Well, regardless of the farrier's talent or lack of talent, after an enlightening conversation with a friend wherein he came up, I don't believe he will be my farrier any more. And I still need someone to come out and trim them, so.... we'll see who I can rustle up, because I've honestly not even heard of another farrier besides the three I've mentioned.
    Is there some kind of Better Business Bureau for farriers out there somewhere that I haven't heard of?

    Also, in that same conversation, my friend mentioned somewhere in Cedar Rapids that fixed up her horse after it literally tore off a chunk of hoof. She's going to get some more information for me on that after she gets out of work, and I'll look into that for Magic's hoof.

    I thank you all for your patience with me and the information that has been given. Please bear with me as I ask a few more.






    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Well there's a big part of your problem, that no amount of booting or otherwise is going to get around. Generally speaking IME, healthy feet shouldn't go longer than about 8 weeks at the very outside, while compromised feet should be done on average at least 4 weekly, if you want to see improvement.
    We have been trying to narrow it down to having a farrier out every ~other month (for all six of the horses -- four have very good, solid feet, by my and my vet's definition of healthy) Tanner & Magic get to see the farrier "as needed" which ends up being closer to once a month.
    Is that pretty satisfactory? It's common around here to only have the farrier out every 2-3 months, and not at all during the winter (unless, of course, an obvious need arises), and a lot of people around here know how to (or, well, say they know how to) do a "little trim", and I've had my uncle (a used-to-be very old-fashioned horsehoer) show me how to run a rasp, but I prefer not to mess with what I don't know enough about.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    They have a lot of excess & while I don't know what this guy started with, so that is a factor, I'm still comfortable saying you don't know what constitutes a good trim if you're saying that. They wouldn't have grown that quickly, but re over fast growth, that's another possible symptom of laminitis.
    He really didn't have much to work from. At all. When I bought them they'd not been touched for ~5 years.
    My image of what a hoof should look like after a trim is something like this: ( this ) And all my other horse's feet are pretty dang close. So maybe I have a wrong mental image?


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Good that they don't get grain, esp with the possiblity of metabolic probs.... but then you say Tanner does get grain, so presuming you have other horses that are 'they'. Mineral blocks unfortunately don't provide much in the way of anything, at least unless the horse actually munches them regularly & then they may get too much salt... I'd personally consult a nutritionist(independant of feed co), but I think it's at least a good move to give them a good quality complete nutritional supp.
    I don't think I actually understood any of this. Can you clarify?
         
        07-14-2012, 12:47 AM
      #14
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RubaiyateBandit    
    Is there some kind of Better Business Bureau for farriers out there somewhere that I haven't heard of?
    Depending on what principles you want to work to, you could get onto Pete Ramey(hoofrehab.com) & ask him for someone good in your area, or you could get onto the master farrier's assoc.

    Quote:
    Tanner & Magic get to see the farrier "as needed" which ends up being closer to once a month.
    Is that pretty satisfactory? It's common around here to only have the farrier out every 2-3 months, and not at all during the winter
    Yes, once a month should be adequate, but a *good* trim is needed too.
    It may be the norm in your area for horses to get trimmed way less frequently, but it's not adequate to keep/promote healthy hooves long-term IME. *Generalising. It does depend on a few factors as to whether 2 monthly would be adequate.

    Quote:
    show me how to run a rasp, but I prefer not to mess with what I don't know enough about.
    Yep, they may show you how to work a rasp, but I agree there's a lot more to it than that, that you need to learn to do a *good* job. It isn't rocket science though & I'd start with learning the principles behind it - hoof form & function, balance, etc - before learning the practice.

    Quote:
    He really didn't have much to work from. At all. When I bought them they'd not been touched for ~5 years.
    Well there's a fair bit to work with on the pics you showed us...
         
        07-14-2012, 12:58 AM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RubaiyateBandit    
    My image of what a hoof should look like after a trim is something like this: ( this )
    Sorry, missed last bits. Yes & no. That hoof may well be well trimmed, considering what's going on with it. Can't tell. It looks to me a bit 'run forward' - that is, stretched toe, underrun heel. *However with only that angle & not knowing what they started with, hard to say. It also depends on the horse, the environment, etc as to what exactly the hoof 'should' look like IMO. Every hoof shouldn't look the same & there are principles to follow, rather than measurements.

    The bit you didn't understand; Grain or other high starch/sugar feed is not great for horses generally. Especially with the possibility of 'sub clinical' laminitis, likely due to diet/metabolic probs, that is evident in your pics, I'd be sticking to low starch, healthy diet. Check out Katy Watts | Safergrass.org for more info.

    Re the mineral lick, this is generally inadequate, which doesn't provide a horse well balanced nutrition. Therefore I'd learn more about nutrition &/or consult a nutritionist or use a program such as feedxl.com in order to work out what you need to provide for good nutrition.

    Does that make sense?
         

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