Farrier says hoof supplements are a waste of money... - Page 4 - The Horse Forum

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post #31 of 50 Old 12-24-2011, 04:39 AM
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Draft hooves do tend to break off in chunks. More to do with their origins in wet europe as opposed to dry asian climates. Nothing you are doing wrong. Just the way it is. You are doing a good job and your horses look lovely. Don't worry so much.

Get your farrier to show you how to touch things up between appointments. When I had mine I actually had to have my husband work the nippers in the summer. My hands just weren't big enough to get a decent grip to get through hardened wall. I could do the rest myself. Just took longer but I'm slow anyway and the horses sometimes get impatient with me.

There are a lot of pictures of the internal structures of the hoof, draft next to light horse horse here:

WHAT IS A HEALTHY HOOF AND WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE

Little warning...several of dissected cadaver feet so if you are squeamish be warned. Many pictures and most aren't icky.
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post #32 of 50 Old 12-24-2011, 08:35 AM
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I firmly believe mother nature does a very good job of designing things. Arabs and various what we call now, pony breeds were designed pretty well.
Drafts were designed by us, and not quite as good a job. Some big heavy horses simply weigh more than their hoof design can support and need to be shod to keep from destroying their hooves. Especially in the summer fly stomping season.
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post #33 of 50 Old 12-24-2011, 11:17 AM
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Forgive me if I repeat what has already been said or the obvious, I didn't read through all of the posts.

As a general rule the front feet are more rounded in the toe than the rear just by nature. However all feet are different due to genetics, use and enviroment.

If you ever want to buy a good book about horseshoeing, not so much to learn to shoe but just to have a better understanding of the hoof and shoeing, buy Doug Butlers Principles of Horseshoeing. It is a little spendy because it is a text book but you can find them used on Alibris.com or maybe Amazon. Well worth the money! It has everything from anatomy to cold shoeing to shoeing drafts and oxen!
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post #34 of 50 Old 12-25-2011, 06:03 PM
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I feed biotin to ruby as she has shocking feet but not riley, no point feeding for problems that just aren't there. Its more expensive than that over here so if I don't need it its a luxury I can't afford.
Both of ours have very pointy back feet but in all honesty farrier doesn't think its bad at all. I had a cob who had really funny feet, he had to have front shoes on the back as he had round rear feet.
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post #35 of 50 Old 12-26-2011, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Joe4d View Post
Supplemnts in horses are similar to people. Let's look at Vitamin C, it is medically proven vitamin C prevents and cures scurvy. Many people take studies like that to run out and buy supplements. Even though it is perfectly possible that they get plenty of vitamin C in their regular diet. Most vitamin/minirals can be used but more generally doenst do anything. Biotin, magniesium, and pretty much every other vitamin and nutrient that horses need is naturally present in some grasses. Your grass may have none or more than enough. SO while owner A ( with nutrient deficient grass) swears by a hoof supplemnt, owner B (who's grass has it )feeds it and sees no difference.
This is true, The body will only absorb what is needed. Vitamins are water soluble so what ever the body doesn't use is passed through the urine. However except for minerals that are basically metal, which is not water soluble, will be stored in the body. Which can can cause overdose.

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post #36 of 50 Old 12-26-2011, 11:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77 View Post
This is true, The body will only absorb what is needed. Vitamins are water soluble so what ever the body doesn't use is passed through the urine. However except for minerals that are basically metal, which is not water soluble, will be stored in the body. Which can can cause overdose.
It's a little more tricky than that. There are some vitamins and minerals that the body DOES only absorb to need, and others that are absorbed regardless. It also depends on what else is in the feed in terms of other vitamins, minerals, and fats, what is not, and even the animal. One non-horse example is dogs: in puppies, up to 10 month or a year, they absorb ALL the calcium in their diets. That's why feeding large breed puppies an unbalanced diet can completely mess up their skeleton. After 10-12 months though, they only absorb what is needed.

True metals (lead, nickle, iron, etc) can definitely linger for a long time in the body since the body's methods of getting rid of them are very, very slow. Other minerals including the light metals (calcium, magnesium, etc) the body can get rid of nearly as fast as water soluble vitamins like the B vits and vitamin C. Vitamin A and D are fat soluble, meaning that an animal can be overdosed on them since the body cannot get rid of them through urine and they tend to build up to very high levels.
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post #37 of 50 Old 12-27-2011, 07:48 PM
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My horse's feet disagree with your farrier. After experiencing an epic wet spring last year with 3 thrown shoes, I started my horse on Horseshoer's Secret. 8 months later we pulled his hind shoes for the first time in his life. My trimmer came out today and said she hasn't seen a TB adjust to barefoot this quickly in a very long time. I think proper nutrition geared toward hoof health is a very effective way to grow healthy feet.

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post #38 of 50 Old 12-28-2011, 12:05 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the input. We have decided to keep our horses on their hoof supplement, Platform Hoof.....their hooves look pretty good to us and they rarely have any chips, even during fly season, so we are going to keep doing what we've always done and give them the supplement. I know our farrier says they have good hooves because of genetics, and to some degree that is probably true, but they've been on this supplement for 2 years and their hoof condition is visible in the pics, so we aren't going to mess with a good thing. If it aint broke don't fix it, right?
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post #39 of 50 Old 12-28-2011, 12:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck View Post
My horse's feet disagree with your farrier. After experiencing an epic wet spring last year with 3 thrown shoes, I started my horse on Horseshoer's Secret. 8 months later we pulled his hind shoes for the first time in his life. My trimmer came out today and said she hasn't seen a TB adjust to barefoot this quickly in a very long time. I think proper nutrition geared toward hoof health is a very effective way to grow healthy feet.
I agree. Nutrition as a whole, not just supplements, are the way to a healthy hoof.
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post #40 of 50 Old 12-28-2011, 12:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77 View Post
Forgive me if I repeat what has already been said or the obvious, I didn't read through all of the posts.

As a general rule the front feet are more rounded in the toe than the rear just by nature. However all feet are different due to genetics, use and enviroment.

If you ever want to buy a good book about horseshoeing, not so much to learn to shoe but just to have a better understanding of the hoof and shoeing, buy Doug Butlers Principles of Horseshoeing. It is a little spendy because it is a text book but you can find them used on Alibris.com or maybe Amazon. Well worth the money! It has everything from anatomy to cold shoeing to shoeing drafts and oxen!
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Agreed! I also have the Principles of Horseshoeing book. It's the farrier's bible in my opinion. If you live by that book, you won't be far wrong. When I first started shoeing with my dad, he gave his book to me and I'd read it when he was driving us between shoeing appointments. Then he'd quiz me, and when he was satisfied, he let me work on customer's horses.
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