Fixing founder, would you lower these heels further? - Page 3
 
 

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Fixing founder, would you lower these heels further?

This is a discussion on Fixing founder, would you lower these heels further? within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        03-03-2014, 09:42 AM
      #21
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    Exactly!!
    Since I never got an answer I can assume you are not a certified farreir which means you should not be messing with other peoples horses feet....particularly one that is sick!!
    You and your friend may have invalidated any medical/life insurance if there was any on the horse.
    You may have also set yourself up for a liability law suit!

    I didn't answer you because I didn't want to get into that conversation - aaand I still don't, I already knew what you were going to say and it doesn't change anything or add to the conversation. Also I don't know what you think we're dealing with here insurance wise but this horse was $35, and that was just to cover last month's farrier visit cost. So, no man I'm not a farrier. The woman who taught me was also not a certified farrier, she was just a barefoot trimmer. She is a phone call away if I run into problems.
    KigerQueen likes this.
         
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        03-03-2014, 09:45 AM
      #22
    Trained
    Where I live, farriers don't have to be certified, licensed, or otherwise papered.

    Whatever the OP is doing, it is surely an improvement over what was being done.
    loosie, Wallaby, greentree and 2 others like this.
         
        03-03-2014, 12:40 PM
      #23
    Banned
    It does not matter if the horse was bought for $1 or $1mil., the point is it is a living creature and it should have care and treatment it deserves.
         
        03-03-2014, 12:51 PM
      #24
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KeroKero    
    I didn't answer you because I didn't want to get into that conversation - aaand I still don't, I already knew what you were going to say and it doesn't change anything or add to the conversation. Also I don't know what you think we're dealing with here insurance wise but this horse was $35, and that was just to cover last month's farrier visit cost. So, no man I'm not a farrier. The woman who taught me was also not a certified farrier, she was just a barefoot trimmer. She is a phone call away if I run into problems.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celeste    
    Where I live, farriers don't have to be certified, licensed, or otherwise papered.

    Whatever the OP is doing, it is surely an improvement over what was being done.
    Yes I am aware of this and I am a bit surprised they would take such a risk, even more suprised that you as a horse owner would have somebody messing with your horse that is not insured, whether it be a farrier or trainer! What makes them so infallible, they are the ones with the biggest chance of something going wrong happening.
         
        03-03-2014, 01:00 PM
      #25
    Green Broke
    Just because a farrier is certified does not mean they are good. I had two certified farriers work on my boy and I, not being certified, do a much better job than either of them did. And before you retort anything, I'm apprenticing under a great certified farrier. Sometimes a piece of paper is just a piece of paper.

    I think you're doing a great job so far. I know how difficult it is looking at severely foundered feet and not really sure of what to do next. I was in constant contact with my farrier(as in sending him pictures and asking questions WHILE I was trimming) while I was trimming my friend's mini. It definitely helped a lot.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    loosie, Wallaby, Foxhunter and 2 others like this.
         
        03-03-2014, 01:04 PM
      #26
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KeroKero    
    We're hoping the reason she's fat is because she usually just stands in the corner of the pasture... doing nothing. I've boarded my horse at this place for 3 years and this horse is always doing just that. Nothing. Sometimes eating.

    The cause of her founder is insane over grown feet - HIGH heels, bars layed over half the sole (assuming impacted), white line stetched out till tuesday. We never saw anyone do anything with this horse, then last week, the original owner passed away and a different boarder bought the horse. Last winter I just called her "founder pony" because no one knew it's name. Many of the horses in the pasture have similar looking feet - the farrier comes every... 8 weeks I think. Not often enough, and not enough is trimmed away. Shoeing was recommended, but we're going the barefoot route.
    Excellent... doesn't change the weight issue though. Even if there is no health issue it's important to get her weight down before it becomes and health issue. (And I doubt it helped with the founder, both in the cause and in carrying extra weight on those feet)

    There's no way you can say the feet are solely the cause without a vet check. 8 weeks isn't a deal breaker but obviously something else is going on.

    Anyways, know it is not your horse, so will just keep an eye out for updates.
         
        03-03-2014, 01:07 PM
      #27
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    It does not matter if the horse was bought for $1 or $1mil., the point is it is a living creature and it should have care and treatment it deserves.
    So do you think the OP should stop trimming the horses feet? Sounds like the alternative is to not have her feet trimmed which got her in the mess in the first place. Which is preferable to you?

    As said, level of skill is not relevant to a piece of paper.
    loosie and Patty Stiller like this.
         
        03-03-2014, 01:39 PM
      #28
    Super Moderator
    Maybe in the best of all worlds, the horse would have the best , certified care. But it looks like this is a case of doing the best that they can for a horse that would otherwise get NOTHING.

    Maybe in Sweden, all horses are insured and get certified care, but in North America, there are so many horses that many of them get what is available, and in this case, it sounds like the horse is very lucky to have these caring people giving it the best they can.
    Wallaby, MiniMom24, Wimpy and 1 others like this.
         
        03-03-2014, 04:04 PM
      #29
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Yogiwick    
    So do you think the OP should stop trimming the horses feet? Sounds like the alternative is to not have her feet trimmed which got her in the mess in the first place. Which is preferable to you?

    As said, level of skill is not relevant to a piece of paper.
    First off you have to know how to handle a diseased foot. You DO NOT CUT OFF THE HEELS!! You get the horse as soft of ground as possible like really thick bedding so the horse will find the most comfortable position to stand and then contact the vet!

    I am mearly sending out a warning!!
    Being helpfull and good hearted can have a back side...Liability, haveing that piece of paper can mean the differance of you footing a medical bill or loosing your horse because the good hearted friend has no way of paying up and for the one who was doing something they should not have been doing finds themselfs in some Judege Judys Court faceing charges.
    And of course the good people from the human society will be wanting too have their say!

    Good or Bad Drivers you are not allowed to drive a motor vehicle without the proper operater license, nor can you drive that vehicle without insurance! This is for the protection off all! The same applies for doctors and vetranarians, itīs a No Brainer that it should apply to other pros such as shoers and trainers who are working with your horse.
         
        03-03-2014, 04:16 PM
      #30
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    First off you have to know how to handle a diseased foot. You DO NOT CUT OFF THE HEELS!! You get the horse as soft of ground as possible like really thick bedding so the horse will find the most comfortable position to stand and then contact the vet!
    I know quite a few people would disagree with you on these points. Soft bedding is not always best, I actually think I'm quite lucky to have snow for support. It packs in nice and keeps'er clean. And though I wasn't 100% on how far to go how fast, the heels must come down. And they will, slowly over the next few weeks a bit at a time.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

    Tags
    founder, frogs, lame, overgrown, thrush

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