Frustrating Hooves! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 26 Old 03-13-2012, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
I think 'Farrier's Disease' as I call it, seems to be a common & universal ailment - not returning calls, not coming when scheduled, keeping people waiting without reasonable explanation & a courtesy call.... etc, etc seems to for some reason go with the territory of the majority of them.
I fired a farrier half for 'Farrier's Disease' and half because he was doing little things here and there to cut corners. He wasn't a terrible farrier, and I might have been able to work with him to get my horse's feet trimmed & shod the way I wanted if only he would have answered my calls... Of course, now I have a farrier who does great work AND answers my phone calls, so I guess I won out on that situation

I second the idea of getting a rasp and learning how to use it between farrier visits. If you have to pull in a farrier from far away, it's good to know how to do some touchups yourself when he can't come on schedule!
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post #12 of 26 Old 03-14-2012, 08:58 PM
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I feel for you. I am going through farrier issues too. Working with one right now that may be a good one. I am ok with the trim job done on my horses and how he handles them. I am just not all that jazzed about how he talks over me to DH. He will address questions and explanations to DH instead of me when the horses are my pets and all up keep is my doing. I have clearly stated that to the farrier.

I will third the idea of learning more about horses' feet and getting a rasp. It helped a lot for me to be able to do some touch ups when I was floating between farriers.
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post #13 of 26 Old 03-14-2012, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by lilbit11011 View Post

I will third the idea of learning more about horses' feet and getting a rasp. It helped a lot for me to be able to do some touch ups when I was floating between farriers.
I agree with this. I've been maintaining my horse's hooves between trims. Seems like he needs a touch up every 2 weeks or so. I do like the idea of being comfortable enough to be able to rasp out a chip or just keep the wall rolled as needed. My horse seems to appreciate it too. I don't have to watch him grow more uncomfortable while we're waiting for the trimmer to come out.

You just have to see your distance...you don't have to like it.
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post #14 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 01:04 AM
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I got sick of it also and learned to trim myself. I now do some rehabilitative trimming and have horses with beautiful sound feet all the time.

Also, just because a crack reaches the coronary doesnt mean its there to stay. Cracks are a sign of imbalance/improper trimming that is creating torque somewhere in the foot and/or can be also related to infection by opportunistic pathogens. They CAN be fixed by a knowledgeable trimmer or farrier. You might have a growth line but the crack itself can be fixed.

Also, there is no such thing as some arbitrary "angle" that is appropriate for one breed over another. Each horse should and must be trimmed according to HIS conformation and structure..not some arbitrary number or style based on a breed. Anyone who trims a horse and doesnt respect that horses needs and conformation will produce a lame horse. Period.

I ride and show TWHs and SSHs...barefoot. They all have short toed, balance and healthy, tight growing feet with a proper short heel, wide healthy frog and well developed digital cushion as all horses should have with properly developed feet. Just because someone somewhere trims the heels off and leaves a long toe to make a TWH gait differently or "better" doesnt mean its correct or healthy.
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post #15 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 01:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilbit11011 View Post
I will third the idea of learning more about horses' feet and getting a rasp. It helped a lot for me to be able to do some touch ups when I was floating between farriers.
While I agree wholeheartedly with your attitudes regarding being able to do 'brush up' trims, there are plenty of other reasons for learning, not least that the actual trimming is but one part of the whole picture you need to look at to help your horses have the best hooves.
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post #16 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 02:19 AM
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Wow I would go insane. I have to brag on my farrier, he is awesome comes like clockwork calls the night before, calls if he is going to be 10 mins late and charges me $15 dollars a horse ( all my horses are barefoot) I also do my part, I'm always there I always have a horse ready by the time he finishes a horse, I make my horse behave I don't expect the farrier to deal with a prancy horse and I compliment the heck out of him and recommend him to anyone who has a horse. Farriering is hard work and if you get a good one hold on with all your might
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post #17 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 11:38 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys! :)

Dad picked up the equipment so we're going to bomb the farrier with questions on the 31st... LOL! I appreciate all of your sound advice! I think he wanted to start this weekend, but nothing was said to me... It was like "Hey, look what I picked up" and then he walked away with me holding it. Good guy, big heart, minimal communication. LOL. Thanks again! :)

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"I don't know.......... looks more like a Quarterhorse to me."
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post #18 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by chandra1313 View Post
Wow I would go insane. I have to brag on my farrier, he is awesome comes like clockwork calls the night before, calls if he is going to be 10 mins late and charges me $15 dollars a horse ( all my horses are barefoot) I also do my part, I'm always there I always have a horse ready by the time he finishes a horse, I make my horse behave I don't expect the farrier to deal with a prancy horse and I compliment the heck out of him and recommend him to anyone who has a horse. Farriering is hard work and if you get a good one hold on with all your might
That's the key. You appreciate your farrier and you show it.

Folks if you want to know why your farrier won't show up, doesn't answer the phone, won't talk to you while he's working, seems in a hurry to get done and get gone, the answer is right there in Chandra's post.

Your farrier will remember if you bring him ice tea. He'll remember you offering him a snack or a fan to keep cool. He'll remember how those horses were caught and tied up and clean, ready to work on.

Try to treat him (or her) better than any other customer would. It doesn't matter if you have expensive horses or a fancy barn. Some of my favorite places to go are poor people's places that appreciated me.
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post #19 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 07:54 PM
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For me, the problem was that I only had 1 to 3 horses to do and the farriers around me wanted a whole barn to do. One or two horses were just not enough incentive and forget it if I only wanted a trim and not shoes or even just front shoes.

I tried everything to get the one great farrier to be reliable but it was all for naught. Getting the lesser farriers took an act of god as it was unless I wanted the guys noone used because they quicked horses and couldnt set a shoe or trim a foot level.

Sometimes you can be the perfect client but have too few horses to do or too small of a job to keep a good one coming. For this reason, I learned and am SO glad I did. I trim my horses better than any farrier around me ever did now that I know what I didnt know back in those days.

JMO
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post #20 of 26 Old 03-15-2012, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by AmazinCaucasian View Post
That's the key. You appreciate your farrier and you show it.
Yeah, I reckon that is one key, but it doesn't guarrantee anything, influence farriers being bothered to answer or return calls in the first place before even meeting you, excuse behaviour like turning up late without calling or not turning up at all.

There are most definitely people that I won't go back to, whether it's about their behaviour or otherwise, whether it's just because I've got enough work already, I consider it common courtesy to at least inform the client, and usually tell them why.... although depending on the reason & person I'm dealing with, I'm not adverse to 'stretching' truths!
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