Good Article on Barefoot Horses
 
 

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Good Article on Barefoot Horses

This is a discussion on Good Article on Barefoot Horses within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Is a barefoot horse good

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    03-04-2014, 10:23 AM
  #1
Yearling
Good Article on Barefoot Horses

The Barefoot Fad can cripple your horse! | Butler Farrier School

G.
     
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    03-04-2014, 11:08 AM
  #2
Yearling
Good article

Seems to be more against un-professional and poorly trained or un-trained farriers and not so much against the practice of barefoot trimming

I would be very interested in comparing the details of a traditional trim vs. a barefoot trim vs a "natural" trim
     
    03-04-2014, 11:13 AM
  #3
Started
I am not sure what part of this article would be considered "good"? It was coherently written by someone with a firm opinion and no desire to present both sides. I suppose there is nothing wrong with that, though in doing so the author makes HUGE generalizations and paints everything with so broad a brush that their assumptions border on untrue.

I absolutely agree with the article's statement that "we must account for individual differences. One size does not fit all. We are not all the same. Each horse is unique." But, IMO, this includes shoes as well as no shoes. Many horses need shoes to be sound in the work they're asked to do. Just as many don't, either because they're not doing much work, or because they're actually fine barefoot.

Unfortunately, the author's assumption that shoers are by default more competent than those who don't is false. Just as much harm can be done from shoes applied by a fool as a foot trimmed and left barefoot by a fool. I do agree with the author that training is key and really the important thing in caring for a horse's feet. Training, education, and making the right choice for the horse in front of you.
loosie, Wallaby, KeroKero and 2 others like this.
     
    03-04-2014, 11:56 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
I thought the article limited and rather poor and completely contrary to my personal experience.
     
    03-04-2014, 01:45 PM
  #5
Yearling
I was surprised that the current "barefoot movement" is a second go 'round, with prior one being a century ago. That was illuminating. In many ways the Golden Age of Horsemanship comes at the end of the Age of Horsepower and the dawn of the Age of Petroleum Power. That they tried and abandoned the "barefoot philosophy" to me speaks volumes.

The article is "good" because it is well and cogently written. That it reflects, even strongly reflects, a bias does not make it less "good." Those who disagree with the author are free to find other sources more in line with their own views.

His comments on "certification" are most appropriate.

G.
     
    03-04-2014, 01:57 PM
  #6
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guilherme    
I was surprised that the current "barefoot movement" is a second go 'round, with prior one being a century ago. That was illuminating. In many ways the Golden Age of Horsemanship comes at the end of the Age of Horsepower and the dawn of the Age of Petroleum Power. That they tried and abandoned the "barefoot philosophy" to me speaks volumes.

The article is "good" because it is well and cogently written. That it reflects, even strongly reflects, a bias does not make it less "good." Those who disagree with the author are free to find other sources more in line with their own views.

His comments on "certification" are most appropriate.

G.
A good article is one which is well balanced, analytical and looks at all relevant points and expresses intelligent arguments. This one does none of that and certainly does not express any understanding of what barehooves are actually capable of.
loosie, Wallaby, Saranda and 3 others like this.
     
    03-04-2014, 03:34 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clava    
A good article is one which is well balanced, analytical and looks at all relevant points and expresses intelligent arguments. This one does none of that and certainly does not express any understanding of what barehooves are actually capable of.
"Good" is a "mush" word, meaning it means what a person thinks it ought to mean.

Articles can be "good" even if they strongly reflect a point of view. They can be "dreadful" even if beautifully balanced.

Actually I think this gentleman has a fine grasp of what "barefoot" hooves are capable of.

G.
     
    03-04-2014, 05:05 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guilherme    
Actually I think this gentleman has a fine grasp of what "barefoot" hooves are capable of.

G.
If he did then he would know that barefoot horses compete at endurance and are used in many police forces successfully which they would have problems doing if they were "crippled". When corrective shoeing fails it is often a barefoot rehab that will be their last chance saloon and the horse's saving. Some owners cannot or do not wish to provide the correct environment for barefoot hooves to work and that is fine, but many domestic owners can easily have very happy, sound and hard working barefoot horses. To say it is some faddy experiment being repeated is frankly ridiculous, and certainly in the UK more and more owners are realising that their horses simply do not need shoes.

This is why I think the article is not good which is not a "mush" word, but a plain and simple one meaning to be desired or approved of;
having the required qualities; of a high standard.
Eolith, loosie, Wallaby and 2 others like this.
     
    03-04-2014, 05:48 PM
  #9
Green Broke
This shouldn't even be in this section and, IMHO, the abrasive manner in which the FOUR YEAR OLD article was written, was only published to start arguments.

Much has changed since 2010 in both the barefoot and the shoeing world, including the FACT that I almost had to put a horse down thanks to an AFA certified "Legend In His Own Mind" farrier that stopped listening to my vet after the third trim.

That incident was in 2012 and I recently discovered he also crippled a hunter/jumper for someone.

What has saved that horse's life is a modern day barefoot trim. The horse is now sound and moving better than he's moved in years. I keep him filed down in-between his 4-week formal trims.

The above article is slanted in such a way so as to present ALL barefoot trimming as bunk. There is good and bad in every venue. I've seen some shoeing jobs where the farrier should have had those shoes shoved right down his throat sideways.

I'd like to go toe-to-toe with writer in real life, not across a keyboard but it would be a moot point as, to reiterate, the article is four years old and not worth the powder to blow it into the next county by this time.

MODS, please move this conversation into the hoof section, where it rightfully belongs and will get traffic from the very folks whom it is trying to tar and feather


Moderator note:

This thread has been moved from the gaited forum to the hoof health forum, as requested.
Next time. Please report a thread that is misplaced, if you please.
loosie, Wallaby and KeroKero like this.
     
    03-04-2014, 06:40 PM
  #10
Started
Even if there was a "fad" that failed, have no doubt that people continue to learn and evolve. Just because they may not have figured out how to provide the most effective barefoot trim in the past doesn't mean that they haven't figured it out now. Wild mustangs trot over absolutely jagged volcanic rock with nary a falter. I've seen them do it. Extensive studies have been done on wild horses' hooves and how they work for the horse. This information has been utilized by some trimmers to influence the way that they trim.

I agree 100% that it is absolutely imperative to have a well educated and proficient individual trim and/or shoe your horses' hooves. That's why I pay extra to have my trimmer drive almost 2 hours to meet me. Could I find another "trimmer" closer and cheaper? Sure, but it probably would be someone who watched a DVD or two and picked up some nippers. I can honestly say that I have seen just as many farriers who have no idea what they're doing as trimmers. The trick is to find the true professionals.
     

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