A good looking hoof-Photo update - Page 3
   

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A good looking hoof-Photo update

This is a discussion on A good looking hoof-Photo update within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category

     
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        01-12-2009, 01:59 PM
      #21
    Started
    Im glad your horse has smaller feet as well, April has smaller feet and I had a guy coment on how small they were and they maybe should be bigger. I don't have any pics, but she has never been lame and she is barefoot. My Farrier said that she has very good stucture in them as well.

    I just wish I could get Chloes feet as nice as Vida's!!!
         
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        01-12-2009, 03:38 PM
      #22
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Velvetgrace    
    Can a person do the barefoot trimming themselves? Or is it wise to have someone that knows what they are doing to do it?
    Yes Velvetgrace, you can do them yourself, especially if you simply cannot find anyone in your area who can do a good job. It is best if you have someone who can show you the techniques of how to handle the tools and you do need to study. Look at lots of sites and I highly recommend the yahoo group barefoothorsecare for helpful online tutoring.
         
        01-12-2009, 11:04 PM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mayfieldk    
    I've had farriers that only took off bad flaps of the frog, and my Paint constantly had thrush and just nasty heels in general. You used to be able to stick a pen in his heel, it was so nasty.
    Needless to say, my new farrier trims the frog every time and those horse's feet haven't ever looked better, and he hasn't been this sound in a long time. But, to each his own--when it comes to hooves, no two things work the same on a different horse.
    I don't believe a frog should be trimmed routinely at all. I will remove flaps & tags, but not always. Depends on the climate & what they live on too. If the feet are likely to get & stay muddy, I will remove flaps that could harbour thrush.

    Routine trimming of frogs not only removes the calloused(hopefully) outer skin & makes the frog more sensitive, but in exposing the softer material actually further encourages thrush. I suggest there has been more going on than just whether the frogs are pared or not, if the horse no longer has thrush. The method of trimming - principles that are followed - has a large bearing, as do diet & nutrition, as do the environment the horse lives on & his lifestyle.
         
        01-12-2009, 11:12 PM
      #24
    Green Broke
    My horses live on soft, wet ground 75% of the time. Their pasture will dry out from time to time, but we're battling TWO Artisian spring heads at the moment... Ugh. So, needless to say, their frogs MUST be trimmed. They don't wear any of it down on their own and the wet conditions is a thrush haven. If I don't trim their frogs down, they grow too long and thrush pops up.

    Now, when we finally get the pasture going the way we want (hopefully by the end of Spring), they will have lots of gravel and dry ground to walk on with "rough" concrete under their shelter, and this shouldn't be a problem. But until then, their frogs will be routinely pared down.
         
        01-13-2009, 02:39 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Since it's my trim, I'd like to respond! =) I like all the comments and opinions, because they let me see if I've missed something, because I AM just human! But I actually have reasons for the way I trim, and sharing them might help someone.

    The bars were left alone becuse when I've removed any of it in the past, they popped right back up(on this horse). As long as they aren't above the rest of the wall when I'm finished, I'm leaving them alone for the most part. I've had excellent results in doing so, so even if they are bit longer than desired but not causing lameness, then they eventually correct themselves anyways.

    For the flaps on the frog, I really don't remove much, ever, unless the foot has thrush already in it, then I will remove diseased pieces. These horses aren't kept in dirty, muddy pens, and aren't prone to thrush. I don't feel that removing those smaller flaps would have been any benefit to the hoof.
    Basically, if my cutting something off won't improve the foot, I leave it.
         
        02-08-2009, 07:52 PM
      #26
    Foal
    I am interested in gathering more details on hoof health & allowing the sole/frog to grow naturally with less trimming.
    How long have you been trimming, or not trimming the sole/frog in this manner?
    Did you find a farrier who prefers only this method or have you asked your farrier to trim this specific way?
         
        02-09-2009, 11:41 AM
      #27
    Showing
    Barefoothooves, the person who posted just before you is my farrier. I think she has been doing our horses for close to 2 years with a short hiatus so she could have a baby
    We searched for someone who would do a trim like this. We had farriers in the past that we tried to talk into a more natural trim, but none seemed interested in learning. I found her via this forum and another member from Kansas.
         

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