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Harden up!!

This is a discussion on Harden up!! within the Hoof Care forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Millet for hoof growth

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    08-18-2013, 06:03 AM
  #11
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
I don't mean to be picky, I am just slow on the up-take. What is your definition of "weak"...they crack easily, they are soft, he is ouchy...?
This is going to sound bad... But I'm not 100% sure on what my farrier meant, I'll have to ask him next time, but from what I can gather they just break away easy, so say last time my farrier came out I did about 10-20 mins of walking on the road probably all up in the 6 weeks and he said they were worn down and didn't need that much taking off, if I were to do more work on the roads, hard surfaces they will wear down completely.... And then it will be ouchy for him.
He's not really ochey on them as fair as I can tell now (but he mainly gets ridden in dirt/grass)
     
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    08-18-2013, 06:41 AM
  #12
Started
Farriers formula is amazing, if you can afford it, I won't lie, in my opinion that is an arm and a leg right there... Though in saying that I do feed some expensive stuff.

Here's a link on it, an Australian link even (how amazing am I :P ) to give you an idea on price and info, it does say how long it should last for on the page.
Horseshoe Shop | Online Farrier Supplies, Blacksmith Tools & Hoofcare Products
     
    08-18-2013, 08:02 AM
  #13
Foal
Hey red tree I'm from wa to, I give my boy 1/2 cup of millet seed soaked to help with his feet , it has improved his feet they don't chip or crack as much either
     
    08-18-2013, 01:21 PM
  #14
Foal
Weak hooves are not inherent in horses. White hoof, black hoof, TB, QH, Arabian. They're all built the same from the inside out. Same as the feral Spanish Conquistador escapee crosses (Mustangs) who live on hard, dry ground.

Despite domestication, you can help him.

-On what type of ground does he live? Stalls and small paddocks harbor urine/ammonia that will eat his hooves. Wet pastures and soggy ground soften hooves, just like fingernails in a lengthy bath. Dry hard ground, sans iron shoes, builds strong hooves.

-Improper trimming (before the shoe) - I.e. Leaving the walls splayed, flared and long, beyond where the inner structures of the hoof can support it. (ever leave your toenails too long in riding boots?) - and driving shoe nails into chipped, overgrown hoof wall can cause the weight bearing hoof wall to fall apart.

-Oiling cracks can attract dirt and microbes into an already compromised hoof wall.

-In his "club hoof" what is the angle of the coffin bone? Some foals grow their heels faster than their toes and they’re incarcerated for life by a fearful trimmer/farrier who refuses to get the hoof out of the way according to the inner structures. A TRUE club hoof is rare. If the tendon is contracted it may have developed out of incorrect trimming. Vets? Can contracted tendons be gradually stretched with careful, knowledgeable trimming? What do his bones look like from the inside?

Poor guy. I (human) couldn’t run track and high jump in high-heels.
     
    08-19-2013, 10:16 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Look at Mayfield Barehoof Care Centre Home Page for more info & also possibly local well qualified help if necessary. A low carb/grain, well balanced diet with extra magnesium will be a start. Agree w above on other specific nutrients. If he has very weak feet, there may be probs you may need to help him get over before just trying to 'toughen him up'. Until they're healthy at least, boots or such may be a better option than shoes.
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I second this. Andrew Bowe from Mayfield is a qualified Master Farrier (traditional type shoeing and trimming) as well as a barefoot trimmer. He knows what he is on about. He has some awesome ideas about hoof rehabilitation. I went to a lecture he did and he was amazing. He has successfully rehabilitated laminitic horses (full on Pedal bone rotation - as in it was sticking out the sole of the hoof). He has case studies on his website. He also comes over to WA occasionally :)

Introduce a variety of surfaces to your paddocks or laneways if possible, pea gravel, rubber matting, compacted dirt, rocks... It will help stimulate the frog, digital cushion and sole.

Also contact Victoria Ferguson (The Country Herbalist - Victoria Ferguson - Home). Quite often weak hooves are a result of a mineral imbalance. She should be able to help tweak your horses diet and it will hopefully have an improvement on his hooves. This is speaking from experience. My TB had alright feet but a dry coat. Since being on one of her diets, his coat is starting to shine through the layer of dirt he is covered in and my farrier has commented that his new hoof growth is looking pretty good. It will take a while for his hoof to grow out and the effects to be seen fully, but so far, so good. AND the best part? It's pretty much costing me the same to feed her diet as it did to feed him what I used to feed. :)
loosie and RedTree like this.
     
    08-21-2013, 02:08 AM
  #16
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffinbone    
Weak hooves are not inherent in horses.
Whaaaat??

Ok the outrageousness of barefoot extremism has reached an all-time high
Patty Stiller likes this.
     
    08-23-2013, 02:34 PM
  #17
Yearling
I think a sealer (hardening) would help. Especially in the nail holes and around the hoof that had the periople rasped away. That is also the outer protection that prevents hooves from most moisture.
     
    11-20-2013, 12:30 PM
  #18
Foal
My horse used to get cracks all the time and abscesses. It was ridiculous, but a farrier put us onto Bioequine and ever since my horse's feet have been so darn solid to the point that I accidentally left her for 8 weeks without a trim last time because her feet looked so amazing. I'm so incredibly picky about horse's feet as I competitively jump and my last mare went lame, so that's saying something that I wasn't on top of her trim! I know the stuff says it's more for digestion and stomach, which is why not many people consider to use it for hooves, but it has been incredible.
     
    11-23-2013, 11:27 AM
  #19
Yearling
Quote:
Weak hooves are not inherent in horses. White hoof, black hoof, TB, QH, Arabian. They're all built the same from the inside out
. Actually that is not true. Some horses inherently lack internal cartilage structure internally . The biggest differences in structure quality lies in the amount of supportive cartilage embedded in the fat of the digital cushion and in the "axial projections" of a cartilage 'bridge' connecting between the lateral cartilages. (Robert Bowker)
Quote:
Same as the feral Spanish Conquistador escapee crosses (Mustangs) who live on hard, dry ground.
NOPE. The feral horses have nearly 1/4" thick of axial projection bridge connecting the way across under the digital cushion to help hold up the coffin bone. But a lot of domestic horses (thoroughbreds particularly) have nearly none.

And I disagree with some researchers (including Dr Bowker) that a weak foot is mstly caused by environment. I KNOW it is genetic to a great extent. This is because if you go to a large TB or QH farm, you will find foals of the same crop with widely varying quality of hooves , but no other differing factor that their parents. All the foals are all living on the same feed, same exercise, same pastures but different parents. And there are sires or dams that are known to produce good or bad feet in their offspring , every year.
     
    11-23-2013, 07:47 PM
  #20
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patty Stiller    
And I disagree with some researchers (including Dr Bowker) that a weak foot is mstly caused by environment. I KNOW it is genetic to a great extent. This is because if you go to a large TB or QH farm, you will find foals of the same crop with widely varying quality of hooves , but no other differing factor that their parents. All the foals are all living on the same feed, same exercise, same pastures but different parents. And there are sires or dams that are known to produce good or bad feet in their offspring , every year.
Yes, it is quite obvious there are genetic factors there & I don't think Dr Bowker would dispute that either. It's common knowledge there are 'lines' of horses bred with inherently bad feet. I think, and how I understood Bowker's research, is that it is *predominantly* environmental factors - development or lack of - that make the most difference. Another point is that it appears from his research that even 'good footed' horses in ideal environments don't start developing much in the way of digital cushions & lateral cartilages until around 4yo. Wish there were more studies on all this. It'd be very interesting to see rad or MRI reports of differences in foals as well as of mature horses subject to the same environmental factors.
     

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